March 8, 2013
Weekly Edition 
Issue 7, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings from TSHA!

We are having a great time here in Dallas at the Texas Speech-Language Hearing Association's annual conference/convention.  We made new friends like Clarissa and Ashley, and met up with old friends like Winter Pediatrics.  And you just never know who Cartwheel Boy will hang out with

Here is our newsletter offering for you this week!
 
News Items:
  • Video Games Found to Help with Dyslexia
  • Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and Aerobics: Evaluating the New 'R' in Academic Performance
  • Feel Good Story of the Week: Children with Down Syndrome Taking the Modeling World by Storm
  • Physical Therapy In Autism Spectrum Disorders  
  • Children With ADHD Require Long-Term Treatment Well Into Adulthood
  • Speech Emerges in Children On the Autism Spectrum With Severe Language Delay at Greater Rate Than Previously Thought
  • The Brain Adds New Cells During Puberty To Help Navigate The Complex Social World Of Adulthood
  • Encouraging Eye Contact May Disturb Thinking in Children with Autism 

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Book Review of the Week: Teaching The Difference Between Honesty and Being Frank
  • PT Activity of the Week:   Slow Motion - Muscle Strengthening Game
  • App Review: Social Skill Builder
  • SLP Resource of the Week: Eggs Everywhere - Free Printable Book

Articles and Special Features 

  • OT/PT Corner: Extreme Candyland - a "Sensational" Way to Play the Classic Board Game
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner:  Head Shoulders, Knees and...Peanut Butter.  What Makes Young Children Laugh?
  • The SLP Grad Student's Corner: Communication Matrix
  • Worth Repeating: Principal: 'I was Na�ve About Common Core'
  • Also Worth Repeating: The PediaStaff Career Guide for SLPs, OTs, PTs, School Psychologists and all Assistants!  
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





The Career Center

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Recent Occupational Therapist and COTA Jobs 

School Psychologist Jobs 

Dyslexia in the News:  Video Games Found to Help with Dyslexia

[Source:  UPI.com]

 

Playing action video games can make dyslexic children read better, Italian scientists say, and even short spells with games can greatly increase reading skills.

 

Writing in the journal Current Biology, the researchers reported 12 hours of video game play did more for reading skills than is normally achieved with a year of spontaneous reading development or traditional reading treatments.

 

Previous studies have linked dyslexia to early problems with visual attention rather than language skills, they said.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Physical Fitness in the News: Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and Aerobics: Evaluating the New 'R' in Academic Performance

Editor's Note:  PediaStaff frequently reprints this research articles as "odes to the obvious."  Take a hard look at this article however.  The data on this one is really quite remarkable.

 

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Although the long-term consequences of childhood obesity are well documented, some school districts have reduced physical education classes to devote more time to the 3 Rs in education - reading, writing, and arithmetic. However, there is new evidence that leaving out an important fourth R - aerobics - could actually be counterproductive for increasing test scores.

 

A new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics studied the associations between aerobic fitness, body mass index (BMI), and passing scores on standardized math and reading tests.  

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Feel Good Story of the Week:  Children with Down Syndrome Taking the Modeling World by Storm   

[Source:  The Sun (UK)]

 

With their gorgeous faces and cheeky grins, it's not hard to see why they got snapped up.
 

But unlike the kids we are used to seeing in ad campaigns, all these were born with Down's syndrome.

Last year saw more DS children than ever before gracing the catwalks and catalogs and demand from fashion retailers is at an all-time high.
 

Xanthe Breen, of the the Down's Syndrome Association said: "Around one in 1,000 babies is born with Down's syndrome - a genetic condition caused by an extra chromosome. People with Down's need a little extra help to achieve their full potential.

 

"At the association, we have seen a real change in attitude towards DS since we started in 1970.

 

"When you look at these children, the first thing you notice is their beauty.

 

"By being photographed and then being part of various advertising campaigns, the models are helping to break down barriers and promote positive inclusion.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Autism Treatment in the News:  Physical Therapy In Autism Spectrum Disorders  

[Source:  Brain Blogger via Special Ed Post]

The CDC estimated a 1% worldwide prevalence for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the United States, 1 out of 88 kids is diagnosed with ASD (according to data from a survey conducted in 2008). Autism spectrum disorders are characterized by diminished social interaction skills, stereotypic engagement in repetitive tasks, lengthy visual engagement with a target, refusal to deviate from set rituals and diminished spontaneity in expressing emotions. In addition to behavioral difficulties, reduced motor abilities are also reported.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

ADHD Research in the News:  Children With ADHD Require Long-Term Treatment Well Into Adulthood  

[Source:  Medical News Today]

The first large, population-based study to follow children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) into adulthood shows that ADHD often doesn't "go away," and that children with ADHD are more likely to have other psychiatric disorders as adults. Although numbers were small, they also appear more likely to commit suicide and are often incarcerated as adults.

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Autism Related Language Delay in the News:  Speech Emerges in Children On the Autism Spectrum With Severe Language Delay at Greater Rate Than Previously Thought   

[Source: Science Daily]

 

New findings published in Pediatrics by the Kennedy Krieger Institute's Center for Autism and Related Disorders reveal that 70 percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who have a history of severe language delay, achieved phrase or fluent speech by age eight. This suggests that more children presenting with ASD and severe language delay at age four can be expected to make notable language gains than was previously thought. Abnormalities in communication and language are a defining feature

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Brain Development in the News:  The Brain Adds New Cells During Puberty To Help Navigate The Complex Social World Of Adulthood    

[Source: Medical News Today]

 

Two Michigan State University neuroscientists report in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

Scientists used to think the brain cells you're born with are all you get. After studies revealed the birth of new brain cells in adults, conventional wisdom held that such growth was limited to two brain regions associated with memory and smell.

 

But in the past few years, researchers in MSU's neuroscience program have shown that mammalian brains also add cells during puberty in the amygdala and interconnected regions where it was thought no new growth occurred. The amygdala plays an important role in helping the brain make sense of social cues. For hamsters, it picks up signals transmitted by smell through pheromones; in humans,


Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Autism Research in the News:  Encouraging Eye Contact May Disturb Thinking in Children with Autism     

[Source My Health News Daily]

 

Children with autism look away from faces when thinking, especially about a challenging problem - just as people without the condition do, according to a recent study.  

Avoiding eye contact is a common behavior of people with autism, and children with the condition are sometimes trained and encouraged to meet others' gazes.  

But the new findings show that looking away sometimes serves a purpose, and encouraging eye contact can interfere with a child's thoughts.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Book Review of the Week:  Teaching The Difference Between Honesty and Being Frank   

Thank You to Sheri Artemenko, M.A., CCC-SLP  of Play on Words for sharing this book review!

Often as speech pathologists we are called upon to teach kids the nuances of language. What does someone REALLY mean when they say something? Can we get some clues from their face and body language?

 

I just found this new book, "Being Frank" by Donna W. Earnhardt, at the library that deals with the difference between "being frank" and "being honest." I have had fun reading and discussing it with my kids in language therapy to see their understanding of the subtle difference. Frank (also his name) believed that honesty is the best policy until he managed to annoy, enrage and offend his family and friends with his overly frank comments. Telling his teacher her breath smelled funny, his friend her

 


 Learn About These Great Resources on our Blog

PT Activity of the Week:  Slow Motion - Muscle Strengthening Game   

[Source:  Your Therapy Source]

 

Here is a fun, simple strengthening exercise that requires no equipment - slow motion.  When you slow down a motion it requires more muscle control and a longer muscle contraction.  Pretend to act out the following activities in s-l-o-w motion:

  1. Running a race
  2. Shooting a basketball
  3. Walking up or down stairs
  4. Bicycle riding laying on your back
  5. Ballet dancing
 Read More About this Activity on our Blog

App Review of the Week:  Social Skill Builder   

[Source: Sublime Speech]

Over the past month I've had the opportunity to use Social Skill Builder's App!  Both the Full and Lite versions are compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad (iOS 4.3 or later).  I had previously used the Lite version but was provided the Full version for the purpose of this.

 

According to Social Skill Builder, this app was designed by SLPs.  It utilizes real life video interactions to promote social learning for kids with Autism spectrum disorders and other learning or language

 

Read the Rest of this App Review on our Blog

SLP Resource of the Week:  Eggs Everywhere - Free Printable Book   

Editor's Note:  I had the privilege to meet Ruth Morgan of Chapel Hills Snippets this past fall at ASHA.  She is such a lovely person, and a blessing to the field.  Her wonderful blog has definitely leaped up in my estimation as one of my very favorites -and to top it off she continues to keep all her great materials free!

Here is a great downloadable/printable Boardmaker book for the Easter/Spring season, called Eggs Everywhere.  It is the second Easter/Spring book she has posted recently.

 

 Download this Fun, Free Book Through a Link on our Blog

OT/PT Corner: "Extreme Candyland" - a "Sensational" Way to Play the Classic Board Game

Reprinted with Permission of the SPD Blogger Network as it appeared on their website!

by Rachel White

The very first time our occupational therapist, Juliana, came to play with us she asked Harrison what he wanted to do and he suggested Candyland - the board game.  The "let's-all-sit-around-on-the-floor-and-not-move," very sedentary board game.  Sure, there is some conversation that needs to take place - Who gets to go first? What color guy am i again? Oh, yes, I'm winning! Oh, man, I'm losing! - but, mostly, it's just a draw a card, move your guy, wait your turn kind of game.

Well, no longer! Because sweet Juliana had some tricks up her sleeve and she taught us how to turn boring old Candyland into what we like to call "Extreme Candyland!"  As you can see from Harrison's sentences below (for a homework assignment he had this week), it's now his favorite game. or his "favrit" game. either one.

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Pediatric Therapy Corner: Head Shoulders, Knees and...Peanut Butter. What Makes Young Children Laugh?

by Paul McGhee, PhD, LaughterRemedy.com 

 

[Adapted from P. McGhee, Understanding and Promoting the Development of Children's Humor, Kendall/Hunt, 2002.  To order, call 302-897-7827.]

 


When parents think of their preschool children, the first image that pops into their minds is often that of play, fun and laughter.  Teachers of young children have always been aware of the crucial importance of play for learning, but humor also makes significant contributions to young children's development.  It builds vocabulary and both pre-reading and reading skills, helps solidify the child's knowledge of the world, supports creative thinking, builds social interaction skills, boosts popularity and self esteem, and provides the foundation for a skill that will help cope with life stress throughout the adolescent and adult years.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

SLP Grad Student's Corner: Communication Matrix

by Hanna Bogen

 

Do you know about the Communication Matrix? If not, then this is your extra lucky day! I, along with my fellow UW grad clinicians, use this measure during lots and lots of evaluations, especially when the client is at a developmental stage where they are not using a huge number of conventionally communicative behaviors. I'll give a short and sweet overview of the Communication Matrix, but the best way to learn more about it is to go to the website and check it out yourself!


Worth Repeating: Principal: 'I was Na�ve About Common Core'

Editor's Note:   Reading Rockets carried a summary and link to this Washington Post story on their blog this week.   We found it a very thought provoking piece as well.

Here's a powerful piece about how an award-winning principal went from being a Common Core supporter to an opponent. This was written by Carol Burris, principal of South Side High School in New York. She was named the 2010 New York State Outstanding Educator by the School Administrators Association of New York State. She is one of the co-authors of the principals' letter against evaluating teachers by student test scores, which has been signed by 1,535 New York principals.

Also Worth Repeating: The PediaStaff Career Guide for SLPs, OTs, PTs, School Psychologists and all Assistants!

May is rapidly approaching, and with it, also coming up is graduation day for many of student clinicians that follow this blog.   We have gotten terrific feedback on our Career Guide for pediatric therapists, and thought it was a great time of year to share with with you here again!

It contains a time-line for job search planning, resume writing tips, interviewing tips, a sample resume, some of our frequently asked questions, and more. Please feel free to share it with your friends! 

 

Download the PediaStaff Career Guide on our Blog

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