September 13, 2013
Issue 30, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings!

Please enjoy our newsletter offering.  Have a great weekend!

News Items:
 
  • Robotic Therapy Aids Kids' Handwriting Skills
  • Kids w/Behavioral Problems More at Risk of Inflammation, Health Problems Later in Life
  • Look at What I'm Saying: Engineers Show Brain Depends On Vision to Hear
  • With Horses and iPads, Children with Autism Learn to Communicate
  • Think Twice, Speak Once: Bilinguals Process Both Languages Simultaneously
  • Aerobic Fitness Boosts Memory and Learning in Children
  • Closing in On Risk Factors for Cerebral Palsy and Infant Death

 

PediaStaff News
  • The "My Therapy Share Room" Board is UP!
  • Featured Job of the Week 
Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Therapy Ideas for Adolescents on SpeechDrive.net
  • App Review of the Week: Toca Kitchen
  • Video to Share: Basketball Phenom With One Hand Beats the Odds
  • Picture Chat - Promoting Receptive and Expressive Language Using a Fun and Interactive Ice-Breaker Activity  

Articles and Special Features 

  • SLP Corner:  Hope in a Straw: A Tale of One Organization Bringing Therapy to Children and Adults in Africa with Disabilities
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner:  Averting Disaster Through Inclusive Preparation of Families of Children with Special Needs
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner Too: How Teachers and Therapists Work Together to Facilitate Self Regulation 
  • Worth Repeating: Examining Separation Anxiety Disorder in Children
  • Also Worth Repeating: 11 Things a Special Needs Dad Wants You to Know
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





The Career Center

The links to the right are "live" and reflect the most recent SLP, OT, PT and related assistant jobs, and ALL our Bilingual and School Psychology Jobs. 
Girl
To further narrow your search by state,
setting, bilingual, or term, use the
check boxes drop down menus.

If a particular search is returning
no hits it is possible that we do
not currently have new openings for
you with that selection criteria.

To see ALL our openings
click
HERE and further narrow your search.
Recent Occupational Therapist and COTA Jobs 

School Psychologist Jobs 

Robotics for Therapy in the News:  Robotic Therapy Aids Kids' Handwriting Skills

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Researchers from Leeds and Bradford are working with colleagues from the United States to develop an exciting new robotic device that helps children to practice and improve their manual (hand) coordination.

The findings of a pilot study are being presented today at the British Psychological Society's Annual Conference in Reading, detailing the first time this innovative new technology has been trialled in a UK school.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

The Brain - Body Connection in the News: Children With Behavioral Problems More at Risk of Inflammation, Health Problems Later in Life

[Source: Science Daily]

Children with behavioral problems may be at risk of many chronic diseases in adulthood including heart disease, obesity, diabetes, as well as inflammatory illnesses (conditions which are caused by cell damage).

 

Analyzing data on more than 4,000 participants in the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol, researchers from Harvard and Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health found that children with behavioral problems at the age of 8, had higher levels of two proteins (C-reactive protein - CRP; and Interleukin 6 - IL-6) in their blood when tested at the age of 10. This was the case even after a large number of other factors, including sex, race, background, and medication use, were taken into account.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Language Research in the News:  Look at What I'm Saying: Engineers Show Brain Depends On Vision to Hear   

[Source: Science Daily]

 

University of Utah bioengineers discovered our understanding of language may depend more heavily on vision than previously thought: under the right conditions, what you see can override what you hear. These findings suggest artificial hearing devices and speech-recognition software could benefit from a camera, not just a microphone.

 

"For the first time, we were able to link the auditory signal in the brain to what a person said they heard when what they actually heard was something different. We found vision is influencing the hearing part of the brain to change your perception of reality - and you can't turn off the illusion," says the new study's first author, Elliot Smith, a bioengineering and neuroscience graduate student at the University of Utah.

 

  Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Hippotherapy in the News:  With Horses and iPads, Children with Autism Learn to Communicate  

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Luke, a 7-year-old boy with autism had primarily only expressed requests to his parents (e.g., I want a drink), but this past year he was given a 1-pound iPad, introduced to a 1,000 pound horse and a special program called Strides´┐Ż. During the concentrated eight-week Strides´┐Ż program, Luke used the iPad to have his first two-way conversation, share his feelings and tell his new friends about how he lost his tooth.

 

Children with autism have great difficulty developing verbal communications skills; 40 percent are, like Luke, nonverbal. Southern Tier Alternative Therapies, Inc. (STAT),

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Bilingualism in the News:  Think Twice, Speak Once: Bilinguals Process Both Languages Simultaneously  

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Bilingual speakers can switch languages seamlessly, likely developing a higher level of mental flexibility than monolinguals, according to Penn State linguistic researchers.

 

"In the past, bilinguals were looked down upon," said Judith F. Kroll, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Linguistics and Women's Studies. "Not only is bilingualism not bad for you, it may be really good. When you're switching languages all the time it strengthens your mental muscle and your executive function becomes enhanced."

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

More Mind - Body Connection in the News:  Aerobic Fitness Boosts Memory and Learning in Children   

[Source:  Medical News Today]

Researchers say that physical fitness in children can boost their memory and learning abilities, particularly when initially learning a task that is more challenging.

 

The research, published in the journalPLOS ONE, was conducted by Lauren Raine and colleagues from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

The study involved 48 children aged 9 and 10-years-old. On the first day, a test was carried out to measure the children's aerobic fitness. This involved conducting a maximal oxygen consumption test, which was done while the children carried out physical activity on a treadmill.


 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Cerebral Palsy in the News:  Closing in On Risk Factors for Cerebral Palsy and Infant Death    

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Karin B. Nelson, M.D., scientist emeritus at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, and her colleagues from the University of Sydney, the University of Western Australia and Sydney Adventist Hospital in Australia examined the degree to which four specific risk factors contributed to cerebral palsy and young infant death. The risk factors were asphyxial birth events (incidences during labor and delivery that had the potential to interfere with oxygen getting to the newborn's brain), inflammation (signs of infection), birth defects, and poor fetal growth (low birth weight plus some other factors related to expected size).


Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

PediaStaff Social Media News:  The "My Therapy Share Room" Board is UP!   

'Our first "my Therapy Share" Instagram campaign was a big success!  We got over 80 photos, some of them posted into collages for a pinboard of 69 (and I am sure more will trickle in) pictures of your pediatric speech, OT, PT and school-psych classroom, clinics and spaces!  You can view all the pictures two ways!

 

See These Great Therapy Rooms Through a Link on our Blog

PediaStaff Featured Job of the Week:  Pediatric Outpatient Occupational Therapist - Fayetteville, NC   

Come live, work and enjoy Fayetteville, North Carolina.  We have a wonderful Pediatric client in the Fayetteville, North Carolina area who has an expansion opportunity for a Pediatric Occupational Therapist.  This is an opportunity to expand our offering from speech only to include Occupational Therapy.  You would be the only Occupational Therapist on staff and we are looking for someone who would enjoy developing this offering to our already bustling practice.  This position is best suited to the independent clinician who enjoys managing his or her own time and offers flexibility.

Qualifications: Must hold a Bachelor's Degree in Occupational Therapy; a current state license (or eligible).  Experience in working in a clinic setting with the pediatric population is required.

 

 Apply For This Position Through this LInk

Speech Language Therapy Resource of the Week:  Therapy Ideas for Adolescents on Speech Drive.net  

[Source: SpeechDrive.net]

Karen Clark has a great site with loads of free ideas on how to engage secondary school students in speech and language therapy.  From ideas on how to use vintage advertisements to commercials, cartoons, videos and more, this site has a ton of great idea designed to get kids talking!

 

Check Out This Great Set of Resources Through a Link on our Blog

App Review of the Week:  Toca Kitchen   

[Source:  Bridging Apps]

Toca Kitchen is a cute, creative play app. It helps promote expressive naming as well as conversation. When using this app in therapy, we talk about what the character might like, name all the foods and cooking implements and discuss the cooking processes. We have used this app with children who have speech and language delays and autism between the ages of 3 and 12. It is a favorite of many of the children we work with!  $2.99 at the iOS App Store.

 Read The Rest of this App Review Through a Link on our Blog

Video To Share:  Basketball Phenom With One Hand Beats the Odds   

Editor's Note:  Here is some nice inspiration for our kiddos when they are feeling down! Apparently the University of Florida Gators have already offered him a spot.

 

[Source:  ABC News]

 

When it comes to basketball, Zach Hodskins' skills are undeniable. The 17-year-old hits 60 percent of his shots, and his passes are electrifying.

 

The high school student from Georgia has turned into a national sensation. His highlight reel has been viewed more than 3.5 million times on YouTube. The big shocker: He is playing with just one hand.

 

"After he became active and could crawl out of his crib and he could crawl around, we could tell almost immediately, you know, everything was going to be fine. This kid was awesome, he could do anything,"  

 

 Read the Rest of this Article and Watch a Video of Zach Playing Through a Link our Blog

Therapy Idea of the Week:  Picture Chat - Promoting Receptive and Expressive Language Using a Fun and Interactive Ice-Breaker Activity   

Materials Needed: 

  • Camera (or Ipad/Iphone)
  • A screen or TV that will allow the projection of the pictures you take
  • PowerPoint

Steps:
 

1)     Take individual pictures of the students (as allowed by a photo release if required) in your group prior to your session and place them in a PowerPoint presentation (One picture per page)

2)     On the day of your session, tell the students you are going to show them a picture of one of their classmates for 3 seconds (these pictures should be projected on a screen where the whole group can see them).

3)     The students will try to identify the specific classmate pictured and give three things they know about their classmate and three things they want to know.

 

Learn More About This Activity on our Blog

SLP Corner: Hope in a Straw: A Tale of One Organization Bringing Therapy to Children and Adults in Africa with Disabilities

Have you ever strolled through a store and heard your child or those around you say "Mommy I want this, I want that, I am hungry" oh how we gripe and moan saying if only our child wouldn't be so rude, or demanding. But what if they couldn't tell us anything. What if they couldn't communicate simple things like "I am hungry" How we might miss those pleads. CLASP (Connective Link Amongst Special needs Programs) International is helping children in Africa who have disabilities communicate their wants, needs, and feelings.

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Pediatric Therapy Corner: Averting Disaster Through Inclusive Preparation of Families of Children with Special Needs

Ivan Neil B. Gomez, MAED (SpEd), OT, OTRP  

 

The recent storms that have hit the Philippines brought some concern to majority of the citizens who are residing in areas known to have been perilously afflicted by floods. Since the 2010 onslaught of Ondoy, I guess Filipinos have learned to be prepared for disasters and to follow advice. But one question that has just struck me, how do we prepare the families of children with special needs?

 

With a rough estimate of 2-5% of the entire population having some form of disabilities, it is not absurd to think that there are families of children with special needs that having braving the storms and trying their best to troop to evacuation centers.  I can't even begin to imagine how stressful this can be.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner Two: How Teachers and Therapists Work Together to Facilitate Self Regulation

[Source:  The Friendship Circle]

It's back to school time and that means changes in routine for many students with Autism, especially in Early Childhood special education settings. New federal/state regulations and service delivery mandates, budget cuts, and an increasing emphasis on behavior management means that teamwork and collaboration is in, and "pull out" individual therapy in a vacuum is out. New classrooms, new classmates, new teachers, new therapists, and new schedules can all be potential "triggers" that can cause behavioral issues.

 

  Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Worth Repeating: Examining Separation Anxiety Disorder in Children

[Source:  Play & Child Therapy Blog]

 

Some young children show signs of anxiety when separated from their parents for any period of time.  Mohacsy (1976) argues that children go through a process of slowly separating from their mother or primary caregiver, and begin to form their own individual self beginning approximately around "five months" and completing the process by "the third year of life" (p. 501).  Perez-Olivas, Stevenson, and Hadwin (2008) argue that separation anxiety disorder is one of the most common childhood disorders, particularly in children who are younger than 12 years old.  As described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders  

Also Worth Repeating: 11 Things a Special Needs Dad Wants You to Know


Here is a great article by my friend Gary Dietz who is writing / editing a book by and for Dads of Kids with Disabilities.  

1. Dads like to be invited, too

On more than one occasion I've learned that my child didn't get invited to a social gathering-not because of his disability, but because a female caregiver wasn't available to go with him. Yet his Dad was available! Please don't assume a child can't attend a birthday party or playground get-together because a woman isn't available to accompany the child. If the dad is single, invite

Please Read the Rest of Gary's Essay and Learn More about Gary's Project, Through a Link on our Blog  

Did You Get This From a Friend?

 

Sign Up For Your Copy of This Newsletter!

Would you like pediatric and school-based therapy tips, resources, articles, and news delivered to your computer once a week? Sign up here for our newsletter!

Sign up HERE
Quick Links to PediaStaff
If you would like to opt out of receiving this newsletter, there is a link located in the footer below. However, please note that once you've opted out, we will be unable to send you any future correspondence via newsletter.
Please Note:  The views and advice expressed in articles, videos and other pieces published in this newsletter are not necessarily the views and advice of PediaStaff or its employees but rather that of the author.  PediaStaff is not endorsing or implying agreement with the views or advice contained therein, rather presenting them for the independent analysis and information of its readers.