December 7, 2012
Weekly Edition 
Issue 36, Volume 5
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Welcome!

Please enjoy this week's edition of our newsletter!  Have a great weekend!  I would like to call your attention to one special item this week.  PediaStaff is honored to announce that our blog has been nominated/shortlisted to the voting round of the EduBlog Awards in two categories: 
  • "Best Educational Use of a Social Network" (for our work on Pinterest)
  • "Best Educational / Technical Resource Sharing Blog"
Please VOTE FOR US HERE and also vote for all the other great blogs that made it through to the voting.  SLP blogs are extremely well represented!  Please support them all!   You may vote every day - so please vote early and often!

 
News Items:
 
  • Vote for Us! PediaStaff Shortlisted by EduBlog for Best Education Blog in Two Categories!
  • Psychiatrists Approve New DSM, Asperger's Dropped
  • Acoustics Of Crying Infants Studied To Determine Risk For Autism
  • Prenatal Intervention Reduces Learning Deficit in Mice with Down Syndrome-like Condition
  • Lithium Restores Cognitive Function in Down Syndrome Mice
  • Some Victims Of Childhood Trauma Left With Lifelong Dysregulation Of Stress Hormones
  • Senate Rejects UN Disability Treaty
  • Infants Learn to Look and Look to Learn: Model Explains Crucial Links Among Looking, Learning, and Memory 
  • Mu-Rhythm in the Brain: The Neural Mechanism of Speech as an Audio-Vocal Perception-Action System

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Resource of the Week: Special Needs Holiday Gift Guide From an OT's Point of View!
  • App Review of the Week: Mask Doodle
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week (and All of Last Year) - Handprint Christmas Tree 
  • Chippy and the Occupotamus: A Story About a Young Chipmunk and His First Visit to the Occupational Therapist

Articles and Special Features 

  • Our Turn: Free E-Book: Essential Social Media Tools for SLPs - Blog Hop Style!
  • SLP Corner: Keeping Age Appropriateness with Students
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: Bedwetting and Special Needs Children
  • Worth Repeating: Aggression in Adolescents - Strategies for Parents and Educators
  • Also Worth Repeating: Dyslexia - What's it Got to Do With Talking?
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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PediaStaff in the News: Vote for Us! PediaStaff Nominated by EduBlog in Two Categories! 

Remember our post recently about the EduBlogs Nominations?  Well, the shortlist is out, and voting is open.  PediaStaff is totally honored to have been shortlisted in the EduBlog Awards in TWO categories:

    "Best Educational Use of a Social Network" (for our work on Pinterest)
    "Best Educational / Technical Resource Sharing Blog"

Please vote for us!  You may vote for us daily in both categories!


DSM-5 in the News:  Psychiatrists Approve New DSM, Asperger's Dropped

[Source:  Disability Scoop]

 

Major changes to the diagnostic criteria for autism and other conditions are on track to take effect after the nation's psychiatrists gave final approval to a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders this weekend.

 

The American Psychiatric Association's board of trustees gave a green light Saturday to the DSM's fifth version, paving the way for the manual's publication in May 2013 after more than a decade of consideration.


 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Autism in the News: Acoustics Of Crying Infants Studied To Determine Risk For Autism

[Source:  Medical News Today]  

 

Autism is a poorly understood family of related conditions. People with autism generally lack normal social interaction skills and engage in a variety of unusual and often characteristic behaviors, such as repetitive movements. While there is no specific medical treatment for autism, some success has been shown with early behavioral intervention.

 

Understanding the importance of early diagnosis, researchers at Women & Infants' Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk in collaboration with researchers at University of Pittsburgh have been studying the cry acoustics of six-month-old infants. Their research has recently been published in Autism Research.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Down Syndrome Research in the News: Prenatal Intervention Reduces Learning Deficit in Mice with Down Syndrome-like Condition

[Source:  Science Daily]

Mice with a condition that serves as a laboratory model for Down syndrome perform better on memory and learning tasks as adults if they were treated before birth with neuroprotective peptides, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

 

Down syndrome results when an individual receives an extra copy of chromosome 21. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome occurs in 1 of every 691 births. Features of Down syndrome include delays in mental and physical development and poor muscle tone. These features may vary greatly, ranging from mild to severe.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Early Intervention in the News:  Lithium Restores Cognitive Function in Down Syndrome Mice

[Source:  Science Daily.com]

 

Researchers report that lithium, a drug commonly used for the treatment of mood disorders in humans, restores neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a part of the brain strongly associated with learning and memory.Down syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is the leading cause of genetically defined intellectual disability. In the brain, Down syndrome results in alterations in the connections between neurons and a reduction in the development of new neurons (neurogenesis) that usually occurs   

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Childhood Anxiety in the News:  Some Victims Of Childhood Trauma Left With Lifelong Dysregulation Of Stress Hormones  

[Source: Medical News Today]

 

Abused children are at high risk of anxiety and mood disorders, as traumatic experience induces lasting changes to their gene regulation. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich have now documented for the first time that genetic variants of the FKBP5 gene can influence epigenetic alterations in this gene induced by early trauma. In individuals with a genetic predisposition, trauma causes long-term changes in DNA methylation leading to a lasting dysregulation of the stress hormone

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Disability Policy in the News:  Senate Rejects UN Disability Treaty 

[Source:  Huffington Post/AP]

 

Led by Republican opposition, the Senate on Tuesday rejected a United Nations treaty on the rights of the disabled that is modeled after the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act.

 

With 38 Republicans casting "no" votes, the 61-38 vote fell five short of the two-thirds majority needed to ratify a treaty. The vote took place in an unusually solemn atmosphere, with senators sitting at their desks rather than milling around the podium. Former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, looking frail and in a wheelchair, was in the chamber to support the treaty.

 

The treaty, already signed by 155 nations and ratified by 126 countries, including Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia, states that nations should strive to assure that the

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Pediatric Learning in the News:  Infants Learn to Look and Look to Learn: Model Explains Crucial Links Among Looking, Learning, and Memory  

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Researchers at the University of Iowa have documented an activity by infants that begins nearly from birth: They learn by taking inventory of the things they see.

 

In a new paper, the psychologists contend that infants create knowledge by looking at and learning about their surroundings. The activities should be viewed as intertwined, rather than considered separately, to fully appreciate how infants gain knowledge and how that knowledge is seared into memory.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Speech Production Research in the News:  Mu-Rhythm in the Brain: The Neural Mechanism of Speech as an Audio-Vocal Perception-Action System   

[Source: Science Daily]

 

The cortical mechanisms governing speech are not well understood because it is extremely challenging to measure the activity of the brain in action, that is, during speech production. Researchers in Japan have found modulation of mu-rhythms in the cortex related to speech production.

 

Speech production is one of the most important components in human communication. However, the cortical mechanisms governing speech are not well understood because it is extremely challenging to measure the activity of the brain in action, that is, during speech production.
 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Therapy Resource of the Week:  Special Needs Holiday Gift Guide From an OT's Point of View!   

Editor's Note:  Abby posted her "Holiday Gift Guide" in four separate posts on her blog Notes from a Pediatric Occupational Therapist.   I thought they were very well done, and asked her to combine them into a single post that we could share here with you!

 

Happy Holidays, PediaStaff readers! 'Tis the season for holiday cheer and of course, gift giving! Choosing an appropriate gift for children with special needs can be tricky.   That's why I created several gift guides to help parents shop for children with special needs this holiday season:

Know a child who has been described as a "sensory kid?" Then be sure to check out "Gifts for 'sensory kids'." For toy and game ideas for a child who is blind or visually impaired, check out "Gifts for children with visual impairments," which includes suggestions for babies all the way up to school age children.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

App Review of the Week:  Mask Doodle   

by Aubrey Klingensmith

 

App: Mask Doodle
What It Is: A mask-decorating app by 'Shoe the Goose'.
Price: $.99
OS: Apple
Version: 1.0

 

How It Works: Well, Shoe the Goose made this part of my review quite easy by providing a simple six-step direction page: "1. Select a mask style. 2. Change the head shape, eyes, mouth, and nose. 3. Decorate with paint, texture, and jazz. 4. Print on heavy cardstock. 5. Cut out. 6. Add an elastic band and wear."  

 

Read the Rest of this App Review Through a Link our Blog

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  Handprint Christmas Tree   

This activity from Handprint and Footprint Art was our Pinterest Pin of the Year last year.  With over 1000 repins combined from the two places we featured it on our boards, it is far and away the most popular activity we have posted on any of our Pinterest boards so far!

 

Access this Pin of the Week Through a Link our Blog

Resource of the Week:  Chippy and the Occupotamus: A Story About a Young Chipmunk and His First Visit to the Occupational Therapist  

Editor's Note:  Special Thanks to AOTAInc on Twitter for sharing this wonderful online book for children who are about to visit the Occupational Therapist for the first time.    Jade Yee & Aaron Young, AOTA members from University at Buffalo, created this story for parents to read to children about OT.

 

Check out this Great Online Book for Kids Through a Link our Blog

Our Turn: Free E-Book: Essential Social Media Tools for SLPs - Blog Hop Style!   

As you know, PediaStaff recently sponsored both a Learning Lab session and the Social Medial Learning Center booth (Featuring the #SLPeeps!)   At both venues, we talked about why it is imperative that SLPs understand and embrace the world of social media that is taking our profession by storm.   Whether you want to interact daily or prefer to sit back and listen, social media has become an invaluable resource for communicating with colleagues and staying on top of recent research and trends. 

 

 

Our booth and panel were both quite popular and our visitors expressed an interest in learning more that they could take home with them to digest at their leisure.  We anticipated that this would be the case, so together with our most involved #SLPeeps,  PediaStaff, co-authored and produced a simple e-book that we would like to share with you as a blog hop.    My part below is part five!  Please see the links below for the rest of the book.   We will post the entire PDF next week, but in the meantime, please hop away and support all the fantastic contributors to this fantastic resource!  

 

Read Parts 1- 4 Through Links on our Blog and Part 5 on our Blog


SLP Corner: Keeping Age Appropriateness with Students

by Ryan Knoblauch

 

There's one thing for sure-kids, no matter their ability, should be treated with dignity and respect.  It becomes increasingly more difficult, however, when you have older students with cognitive and developmental disabilities.  This holds true with students who may be in regular education classes, but display other disabilities.  It should go without saying, but I think it is important to repeat.  Students should be treated just like their peers no matter what their disabilities are.

It's taken me time, but I do see how Barney & Friends can be educational.  I have three kids under six years old and they enjoy it.  I, myself, am just old enough to have missed the Barney

 

 Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: Bedwetting and Special Needs Children

by Austin Sheeley, special to Enabled Kids

Bedwetting can be frustrating for both children and parents, whether or not they have special needs. But don't worry-there are several things you can do to help your child overcome bedwetting.  

 

1. Be Supportive!
Perhaps the most important thing is to simply be supportive. Children put great trust in their parents' beliefs. If a parent is supportive and optimistic as their child tries to overcome bedwetting, the child will adopt that optimism.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Worth Repeating: Aggression in Adolescents - Strategies for Parents and Educators

Thanks to our friends at the National Association of School Psychologists for posting this article on their Facebook page in the wake of the Jovan Belcher tragedy.
 

By Tammy D. Barry, PhD, Texas A&M University; & John E. Lochman, PhD, The University of Alabama

 

Childhood aggression is an important focus for educators and parents owing to its relative stability over time and consistent link to a variety of negative outcomes later in adolescence, including delinquency, substance use, conduct problems, poor adjustment, and academic difficulties (poor grades, suspension, expulsion, and dropping out of school). In addition, verbal and physical aggression often are the first signs, as well as later defining symptoms, of several childhood psychiatric disorders. These include Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder, both of 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Also Worth Repeating: Dyslexia - What's it Got to Do With Talking?

Thanks @React2Software for sharing this article with us on Twitter
 
[Source: Mother & Child Blog]

 

My best friend at school had dyslexia (she still has). No, really, she does - it's not just made up for this blog. She is funny, bright and full of good ideas but when it came to reading, writing and maths she found it really hard. Even now she loves reading but it takes her ages to read a book.  She can also find it tricky to put ideas in the right order. When she tells you a story she often gets the ideas mixed up so you're sometimes not sure about the beginning, the middle and the end and who did what, to who and when.

  

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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