May 10, 2013
Weekly Edition 
Issue 14, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Happy Mother's Day! 

Please enjoy our weekly newsletter, and here's to all of you doing double duty as therapy clinicians and Moms of your own kiddos!
 
News Items:
 
  • 'Dark Genome' Is Involved in Rett Syndrome
  • Kids With Conduct Problems May Have Brains That Under-React to Painful Images: May Increase Risk of Adult Psychopathy
  • Sensory Modulation Disorder and Behavior Symptoms
  • Bigger Birth Weight Babies at Greater Risk of Autism
  • Early Intervention Found Cost Effective Through School Years
  • Ice Age Ancestors Might Have Used Words in Common With Us
  • NIMH Won't Follow Psychiatry 'Bible' Anymore 
  • Food Color Additive Linked to ADHD 

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Adaptation Idea of the Week: Adapted Straw
  • Book Review: Your Child's Motor Development Story from Birth to their First Sport
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week: The EllieGrip Handwriting Aid
  • OT/PT Toy Reviews: 10 Great Balance Toys For A Child With Special Needs

Articles and Special Features 

  • SLP Corner: I'll have a Sausage and People Pizza: The Controversy over Auditory Processing Disorder   
  • Focus on Bilingualism: Free Resources for Working with Diverse Populations: Speech & Language Therapy (part 1 of 2)    
  • OT Corner: The Debate Over Cursive - Three PediaStaff OT Columnists Weigh In
  • Worth Repeating: Tackling Negative Behaviors in Children Who are Non-Verbal and Non-Mobile
  • Also Worth Repeating: Tricks to Help Speech Lessons Carryover into Daily Life
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Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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Rett Syndrome in the News:  'Dark Genome' Is Involved in Rett Syndrome

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Researchers at the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program at IDIBELL led by Manel Esteller, ICREA researcher and professor of genetics at the University of Barcelona, have described alterations in noncoding long chain RNA sequences (lncRNA) in Rett syndrome.

 

These molecules act as supervisor agents responsible of 'switch on' or 'switch off' other genes in our genome that regulate the activity of neurons. The work has been published in the last issue of the journal RNA Biology.


  Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Child Psychology in the News: Kids With Conduct Problems May Have Brains That Under-React to Painful Images: May Increase Risk of Adult Psychopathy

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

When children with conduct problems see images of others in pain, key parts of their brains don't react in the way they do in most people. This pattern of reduced brain activity upon witnessing pain may serve as a neurobiological risk factor for later adult psychopathy, say researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 2.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Sensory Modulation in the News:  Sensory Modulation Disorder and Behavior Symptoms   

[Source:  Child Psychiatry and Human Development via Your Therapy Source]

 

Child Psychiatry and Human Development published research on the role of sensory modulation deficits and behavioral symptoms in a diagnosis for young children.  Using clinical observation 78 toddlers were divided into two groups: 18 toddlers with regulation disorders of sensory processing and 60 toddlers with other diagnoses. The parents completed the Infant Toddler Sensory Profile and the Achenbach Checklist.  The results indicated the following:

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Autism Research in the News:  Bigger Birth Weight Babies at Greater Risk of Autism  

[Source: Science Daily]

 

The biggest study of fetal growth and autism to date has reported that babies whose growth is at either extreme in the womb, either very big or very small, are at greater risk of developing autism.

It is the first time that a clear link has been made between babies who grow to above average size at birth and risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder and follows from a study of more than 40,000 child health records in Sweden.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Balance and Gross Motor Fitness in the News:  Early Intervention Found Cost Effective Through School Years  

[Source:  Science Daily]

The Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a comprehensive behavioral early intervention program that is appropriate for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as young as 12 months, has been found to reduce the need for ASD therapies and special education services through the school years following their early intervention. These findings were presented by David S. Mandell, Sc.D., Associate Professor, Director, Center for Mental Health Policy & Services Research, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, today at the Autism Speaks Toddler Treatment Network meeting held in San Sebastian, Spain concurrent with the start of the International Meeting for Autism Research.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

The History of Language in the News:  Ice Age Ancestors Might Have Used Words in Common With Us   

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

New research from the University of Reading shows that Ice Age people living in Europe 15,000 years ago might have used forms of some common words including I, you, we, man and bark, that in some cases could still be recognized today.

 

Using statistical models, Professor of Evolutionary Biology Mark Pagel and his team predicted that certain words would have changed so slowly over long periods of time as to retain traces of their

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

DSM in the News:  NIMH Won't Follow Psychiatry 'Bible' Anymore    

[Source:  ScienceMag.org]

 

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)-slated for release this month-has lost a major customer before even going to print. Thomas Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), declared last week on his blog that the institution will no longer use the manual to guide its research. Instead, NIMH is working on a long-term plan to develop new diagnostic criteria and treatments based on genetic, physiologic, and cognitive data rather than symptoms alone.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

ADHD in the News:  Food Color Additive Linked to ADHD     

[Source:  Special Ed Post]

 

by Valerie Lego

 

More than five million children in this country are diagnosed with ADHD, but how many of them truly have the disorder? Could some of those children be eating something that only makes them appear to have the condition?

 

Research has suggested a link between children who are hyper and appear to have ADHD, and Red Dye 40.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Adaptation Idea of the Week:  Adapted Straw   

[Source:  Your Therapy Source]

This is great!!!  - A picture says a thousand words!

 

 Learn About this Great Idea Through a Link on our Blog

Book Review of the Week:  Your Child's Motor Development Story from Birth to their First Sport   

[Source:  Special Needs Book Review]

High fives to Jill Howlett Mays, OTR/L, Her first book, published in October 2011, is exactly the advice needed by parents, caretakers, and educators working with infants to children aged ten. Most importantly the advice and easy-to-do, enjoyable motor development activities explained in Your Child's Motor Development Story: Understanding and Enhancing Development from Birth to Their First Sport are exactly what that age group of children needs. Ms. Mays' parenting advice on their child's motor

 

 Read the Rest of this Review Through a Link on our Blog

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  The EllieGrip Handwriting Aid   

With over 300 repins and 25 "likes," in just a couple of days, this idea is by far and away our pin of the week.   The original pinner said this about this idea:  Teaching how to hold pencil: cut two holes in an old sock for the index finger and thumb. The other fingers remain in the sock. Genius!!

 

After clicking around a bit and doing a little research, PediaStaff has discovered, that the EllieGrip is actually trademarked product of the Abilitations Company.

  

 Learn More About this Great Product/Idea on our Blog

OT/PT Toy Reviews:  10 Great Balance Toys For A Child With Special Needs   

[Source: Friendship Circle.com]

How Balance Works

 

Ears play a large role in balance due to the vestibular system which arises in the inner ear and is responsible for processing movement, changes in head positions and the direction and speed of movement.

 

The vestibulocochlear nerve sends signals to the brain that control hearing and ultimately helps with balance. The ears receive assistance from the eyes, joints, and muscles too keeping bodies balanced and upright.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through our Blog

SLP Corner: I'll have a Sausage and People Pizza: The Controversy over Auditory Processing Disorder

by Jeremy Legaspi, MS CCC-SLP

 

This post is hopefully the start of an open dialog among colleagues about Auditory Processing Disorders.  I have had this post in draft mode for some time and it's almost the start of a larger post but due to the recent discussion on twitter about Auditory Processing Disorders I thought I would post this. ( I am by no means an expert in the matter and this  post is merely to get people thinking.)

 

 Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Focus on Bilingualism: Free Resources for Working with Diverse Populations: Speech & Language Therapy (part 1 of 2)

by Scott Prath, M.A., CCC-SLP

Working with diverse populations can be incredibly daunting.  As much as we may all wish to be bilingual, the truth is that we can never match all the languages and cultures that appear on our caseload.  The good news is that we can be extremely effective simply by understanding how two languages interact and only treating the sounds or language processes that both languages share.

 

This is the first of two blog posts highlighting some great free therapy materials and evaluation templates for working with Spanish-speaking students and other students from diverse language backgrounds.  We will start here with speech and language therapy and then cover evaluations in

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

OT Corner: The Debate Over Cursive - Three PediaStaff OT Columnists Weigh In

Editor's Note:  Late last week I saw that the New York Times opinion section ran a series of four articles debating the relevancy of cursive in this keyboarding age.   Polled by the NYT to participate were a Professor of Education, a Handwriting Expert, an Archivist and (woo hoo), an Occupational Therapist!

While I wasn't sure that the PediaStaff editorial staff would have the sway to have our opinions published by the Gray Lady,  I thought it might be fun to see what some of our regular 'OT Corner' contributors might like to add to the debate.

 

Thank you so much to the three of you were able to take time out of their busy schedules to weigh in on this topic. 


Read the NYT Opinion Pieces and 3 PediaStaff OT Columnist Articles Through a Link on our Blog


Worth Repeating: Tackling Negative Behaviors in Children Who are Non-Verbal and Non-Mobile

[Source:  Complex Child E-Magazine]

Imagine you are a preschooler with cerebral palsy, unable to control your muscle movements or communicate with your voice.  Imagine that on one particular day, your mother dresses you in your purple scratchy dress, even though you hate purple, you don't like how it feels, and it makes your legs and feet really, really cold.  Since you can't speak, you can't let your mother know you are cold, that the dress is scratchy, and that you wanted to wear red overalls.  Because you can't

Also Worth Repeating: Tricks to Help Speech Lessons Carryover into Daily Life

by Betsy Schreiber

 

[Source: ASHAsphere] 

 

How can our clients better incorporate new skills into their speech in their daily lives? It seems that they are often limited by their social interactions with caregivers, parents or spouses, so that they can't practice or complete speech homework between sessions.

Some of my adult clients will avoid practice sessions with their spouses altogether. How can we encourage use of newly acquired skills between visits? Wouldn't the duration of therapy be reduced and functional communication improved? Research has supported more

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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