January 18, 2013
Weekly Edition 
Issue 3, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Happy Friday! 

Please enjoy our weekly newsletter offering.  Have a great weekend!
 
News Items:
 
  • Dyscalculia in the News (Smithsonian.com) 
  • How Timothy Syndrome (an Autism Related Disorder) Mutation Causes Wiring Defects Associated With Cognitive Impairment
  • Down Syndrome Increases Susceptibility To Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes And Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Feel Good Story of the Week: Beauty Queen With Autism Makes Miss America History  
  • New Gene Variants Linked to Autism
  • Symptoms Of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Ameliorated By Tamoxifen
  • Strength, Balance and Mobility in Children
  • More Feel Good News:  Armless Baby Receives Prosthetic Limbs 
  • Public Comment Opens on Draft Common-Core Test-Accommodations Policy 
  • Wiihab and Balance

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Product Review: The 'AppCrayon' Stylus for Kids
  • Book Review - My Toddler Talks: Strategies and Activities to Promote Your Child's Language Development 
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week: Transferring Worksheets to an iPad 
  • Sensorimotor Activity of the Week:  Bubble Wrap Run

Articles and Special Features 

  • The SLP Students' Corner: Don't Freak Out, It's Just the SH Sound! 
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner:  Self-Monitoring and Self Management for Autism - 75 Minute Video from the MIND Institute
  • OT Corner: Using a Pullover Bib to Practice Pre-Dressing Skills 
  • Worth Repeating: Train a Parent, Spare a Child
  • Also Worth Repeating: Teaching Children with Dyslexia 
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





The Career Center

The links to the right are "live" and reflect the most recent SLP, OT, PT and related assistant jobs, and ALL our Bilingual and School Psychology Jobs. 
Girl
To further narrow your search by state,
setting, bilingual, or term, use the
check boxes drop down menus.

If a particular search is returning
no hits it is possible that we do
not currently have new openings for
you with that selection criteria.

To see ALL our openings
click
HERE and further narrow your search.
Recent Occupational Therapist and COTA Jobs 

School Psychologist Jobs 

Dyscalculia in the Media: (Smithsonian Article)

[Source:  Smithsonian Magazine.com]

 

There are some people-incredibly intelligent people, no less-for whom a grasp of numbers is entirely elusive. Is 6 bigger than 5? What is halfway between 200 and 400? If I give you $10 for a $7.50 purchase, what is my change? If answering these and similar questions, not exactly feats of mathematical expertise of the highest order, is difficult and frustrating, that could be, says Ewen Callaway in Nature, a sign of a neurological discrepancy known as dyscalculia.

Cognitive Impairment in the News:  How Timothy Syndrome (an Autism Related Disorder) Mutation Causes Wiring Defects Associated With Cognitive Impairment

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

A new finding in neuroscience for the first time points to a developmental mechanism linking the disease-causing mutation in an autism-related disorder, Timothy syndrome, and observed defects in brain wiring, according to a study led by scientist Ricardo Dolmetsch and published online in Nature Neuroscience. These findings may be at the heart of the mechanisms underlying intellectual disability and many other brain disorders.

 

The present study reveals that a mutation of the disease-causing gene throws a key process of neurodevelopment into reverse. That is, the mutation underlying Timothy syndrome causes shrinkage, rather than growth, of the wiring needed for the development of neural circuits that underlie cognition.


Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Down Syndrome in the News:  Down Syndrome Increases Susceptibility To Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes And Autism Spectrum Disorders

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

A study led by UC Irvine researchers has revealed some of the underlying neural factors that explain why people with Down syndrome are more susceptible to Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and autistic spectrum disorders.

 

Jorge Busciglio, associate professor of neurobiology & behavior, and colleagues analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in Down syndrome individuals. They found that this breakdown in energy metabolism within brain cells contributes to the higher probability of these other conditions.


 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Feel Good Story of the Week: Beauty Queen With Autism Makes Miss America History

[Source: Disability Scoop]

 

She didn't walk away with the crown, but Alexis Wineman knows she topped the American public's list for Miss America.

 

Wineman, an 18-year-old from Cut Bank, Mont., made history this weekend as the first person with autism to compete in the 92-year-old beauty pageant. Though she did not become Miss America, Wineman was chosen as "America's Choice" after beating out the other 52 contestants in an online vote that took place in the weeks leading up to the event.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Autism in the News:  New Gene Variants Linked to Autism

[Source:  Time]

 

In one of the largest-ever studies of genetics and autism, researchers have identified 24 new gene variants associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The work also confirms that 31 variants previously linked to the developmental disorder may serve as useful genetic markers for identifying those with the condition.

 

Understanding autism's genetic roots is a priority, researchers say, since it may lead to earlier diagnosis and behavioral intervention, which can improve patient outcomes.

 

Read the rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

DMD in the News:  Symptoms Of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Ameliorated By Tamoxifen  

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

A new study has found that tamoxifen, a well-known breast cancer drug, can counteract some pathologic features in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). At present, no treatment is known to produce long-term improvement of the symptoms in boys with DMD, a debilitating muscular disorder that is characterized by progressive muscle wasting, respiratory and cardiac impairments, paralysis, and premature death. This study will be published in the February 2013 issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Pediatric PT Research News:  Strength, Balance and Mobility in Children 

Thank You to Your Therapy Source for sharing this abstract from the Journal Gait & Posture

 

Gait and Posture published research regarding the relationship between lower extremity muscle strength, balance and mobility in 21 children ages 7-10.  Each child's isometric and dynamic strength was tested in addition to their steady-state, proactive, and reactive balance and mobility (single and dual task conditions).  The results indicated the following:

  • significant positive correlations between dynamic and isometric lower extremity muscle strength
 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Another Feel Good Story in the News:  Armless Baby Receives Prosthetic Limbs  

[Source:  ABC News]

Nine months old baby Jamison is reaching milestones. - smiling about first words. His - and now his first set and arms.

 

We couldn't ask for anymore. Are being Jamison was born without arms doctors can't explain why. His parents - broke are now on a mission to give him the very best life possible and it starts with these these are prototype.

 

Arms one of a kind. And - remains especially for Jamison - first - the - to Stanley in November at the time - raising 25000. Dollars for Jamison his first prosthetics.

 

 

 Read the Rest of this Article and Watch Video Through a Link our Blog

Special Ed Policy in the News:  Public Comment Opens on Draft Common-Core Test-Accommodations Policy   

[Source:  Education Week]

 

The public-comment period has opened on two key pieces of a policy that will govern how accommodations are designed for tests on the Common Core State Standards.

The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, has posted two portions of a forthcoming accommodations manual on a special page of its website. The two draft policies deal with calculator accommodations for its mathematics test,

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Balance Research in the News:  Wiihab and Balance    

[Source:  Your Therapy Source]

 

A recent study was published in Developmental Neurorehabilitation regarding the use of the Nintendo Wii to improve balance, motivation and function in children participating in acute rehabilitation following acquired  brain injury.

A multiple baseline, single study research design was used with three subjects who received daily Wii balance training.  The results indicated that two participants were equally motivated by traditional balance training and one participant was more motivated using the Wii.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Product Review of the Week:  The 'AppCrayon' Stylus for Kids    

[Source:  Geek Mom]

The AppCrayon by DanoToys is the first stylus I've ever seen with a triangular shaft designed by teachers and therapists for use by kindergarteners still working on their pencil writing grips. The stylus is plastic, slightly over sized and has a bit larger tip then most styluses making it perfect for kids. This stylus feels very much like a triangular crayon, but looks different enough that a child should confuse a real crayon for the stylus on the screen. Its designed with a small loop on the back to attach to a lanyard or hook if there are worries about misplacing it. The stylus is completely universal so even

 Read the Rest of this App Review Through a Link our Blog

Book Review of the Week:  My Toddler Talks: Strategies and Activities to Promote Your Child's Language Development (Volume 1)     

by Becca Jarzynski,  MS, CCC-SLP

I recently had the pleasure of reviewing a new book:  My Toddler Talks, Strategies and Activities to Promote Your Child's Language Development (Volume 1), by Kimberly Scanlon, MA, CCC-SLP.  This book promises to provide parents with strategies and activities to promote their child's language development- and it delivers.  After looking through it, I have lots to say about it, the first of which is this: If you like Child Talk, you will love My Toddler Talks.   

 

Read the Rest of this Book Review on our Blog 

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  Transferring Worksheets to an iPad 

[Source:  Creative Learning Fun Blog]

Here is a fantastic tutorial on how to transfer any worksheet to the iPad using Good Notes and Dropbox.  It was an extremely popular pin for us last week on Pinterest!

Read this Tutorial Through a Link our Blog

Sensorimotor Activity of the Week:  Bubble Wrap Run  

[Source:  Play, Create, Explore]

We had a package arrive that included a long piece of bubble wrap so on this chilly winter's day and after being cooped up inside with colds for a week, I knew exactly what to do with that bubble wrap!

I taped it on the floor in the long hallway for a bubble wrap run! Both boys had so much fun with this all day long! Not only was it just fun to walk/run across, but we played this game where we had to walk as

 Read this Tutorial Through a Link our Blog

SLP Students' Corner: Don't Freak Out, It's Just the SH Sound!

by Katie Millican

 

There was a moment Monday, before I started my first day of my full-time school internship, where I panicked. Heart fluttering, mind-numbing, terrifying panic. I couldn't verbalize how to teach the "SH" sound. I couldn't think of its place or manner of articulation. It was like the knowledge was lost in an ambiguous depth of space and time. *POOF* 4 years of undergrad and a 1.5 years of a Master's in Speech-Language Pathology, gone. Just. Like. That.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: Self-Monitoring and Self Management for Autism - 75 Minute Video from the MIND Institute

Editor's Note: Here is a fantastic free lecture from UCtelevision and the MIND Institute.  Thank You to the Autism News for sharing this video!! 

Show ID 24543: Video demonstrations and implementation resources for this highly effective, evidence-based practice for children with autism and other learning and behavioral disabilities.

 

 Watch this Lecture on on our Blog

OT Corner: Using a Pullover Bib to Practice Pre-Dressing Skills    

by Christie Kiley, M.A., OTR/L

Yesterday morning my 17-month-old son was wearing a pullover bib (something I had never heard of until my mother-in-law gave us one) and, all of a sudden, he pulled it up and over his head just like he was taking off a shirt. As soon as I saw him do this, a light bulb went off in my OT head and I thought, Aha! What a perfect way to teach kids to pull a shirt up and over their head! Check out the video below to see what I mean (please excuse the mess!).

Read the Rest of This Article (and Watch the Video) on our Blog


Worth Repeating: Train a Parent, Spare a Child

Editor's Note: Thank goodness we have Loren Shlaes of the Pediatric OT Blog to keep up with the New York Times for us.  Thanks Loren for another great article to share!

 

[Source:  New York Times]

 

by Bruce Feiler

 

Someone asked me recently what my New Year's resolution was as a parent. Without thinking, I said, "more creative bribing."

 

I find the issue of bribing children - or to be more precise, the giving of blunt, uncreative rewards for desired behavior ("If you just stop kicking that seat in front of you on the plane, I'll give you 10 minutes of iPad time"; "Clean your room this weekend, I'll give you 10 bucks"; "If you use good manners at Grandma's house, I'll let you have an extra brownie") - to be one of the more nagging challenges of being a parent.

 

On one hand, I've read a small library of articles that have laid out with undeniable persuasiveness evidence that giving children tangible rewards - from money to sweets to an extra hour before bedtime - not only doesn't work in the long term, it actually has a negative effect on them. As early as the 1960s, Edward Deci, then a psychology graduate student at Carnegie Mellon, showed that when external rewards are given, subjects "lose intrinsic

Also Worth Repeating: Teaching a Child with Dyslexia

Editor's Note:  This is an excellent article to share with the general education teachers you work with.

[Source:  Huffington Post]

 

by Alex Dyer 

 

Unfortunately, the label of 'being dyslexic' is often been seen as a negative one. One which can produce upset, limitations and hurdles to a student. However, with the right training, teaching and encouragement it can also produce strengths, talents and creative gifts.

 

Specialist London-based tutoring agency Tutor House has recently come up with a guide to aid teachers, private tutors and parents on teaching dyslexic children. The article analyses the

Did You Get This From a Friend?

 

Sign Up For Your Copy of This Newsletter!

Would you like pediatric and school-based therapy tips, resources, articles, and news delivered to your computer once a week? Sign up here for our newsletter!

Sign up HERE
Quick Links to PediaStaff
If you would like to opt out of receiving this newsletter, there is a link located in the footer below. However, please note that once you've opted out, we will be unable to send you any future correspondence via newsletter.
Please Note:  The views and advice expressed in articles, videos and other pieces published in this newsletter are not necessarily the views and advice of PediaStaff or its employees but rather that of the author.  PediaStaff is not endorsing or implying agreement with the views or advice contained therein, rather presenting them for the independent analysis and information of its readers.