December 14, 2012
Weekly Edition 
Issue 37, Volume 5
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Happy Friday!

Please enjoy our weekly newsletter offering!   Special Thanks to all our readers and supporters who voted for PediaStaff in the Edublog Awards.   We are honored to have been awarded "Runner-Up" in both the "Best Use of a Social Network," and the "Best Educational/Technical Resource Sharing Blog" categories.    We are truly blessed to have such a loyal following.  Thanks, so much!
 
News Items:
 
  • ADHD Linked to Oxygen Deprivation Before Birth
  • Does the Brain Become Unglued in Autism?
  • Device Helps Children With Disabilities Access Tablets 
  • Possible Clue to Children's Early Antisocial Behavior
  • Psychological Therapies Improve Life for Children With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Study Suggests
  • Rhesus Monkeys Cannot Hear the Beat in Music
  • Fragile X Protein Linked to Nearly 100 Genes Involved in Autism
  • Key Gene for Brain Development
Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week: 10 Sensory Winter / Christmas Activities
  • OT Activity of the Week: Q-Tip Painting with Templates
  • App Review of the Week: What did Snakey eat? + Card game!
  • Cutting Through the Hype: Essential Social Media Tools for SLPs - A Guidebook

Articles and Special Features 

  • SLP Corner: Common Core Teacher Rating Scales for your Language Evaluations
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: DSM-5 ASD Criteria Unlikely to Exclude Many Individuals
  • OT Corner: I Have A Little Dreidel (An SPD Hanukkah 2012)  
  • Worth Repeating: How Can Co-morbidity With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?
  • Also Worth Repeating: Is Gamification the Future of Teaching Life Skills?
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Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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ADHD in the News: ADHD Linked to Oxygen Deprivation Before Birth

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Children who had in-utero exposure to ischemic-hypoxic conditions, situations during which the brain is deprived of oxygen, were significantly more likely to develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder later in life as compared to unexposed children, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Pediatrics. The findings suggest that events in pregnancy may contribute to the occurrence of ADHD over and above well-known familial and genetic influences of the disorder.

 

Autism in the News:  Does the Brain Become Unglued in Autism?

[Source: Science Daily]

 

A new study published in Biological Psychiatry suggests that autism is associated with reductions in the level of cellular adhesion molecules in the blood, where they play a role in immune function.

Cell adhesion molecules are the glue that binds cells together in the body. Deficits in adhesion molecules would be expected to compromise processes at the interfaces between cells, influencing tissue integrity and cell-to-cell signaling. In the brain, deficits in adhesion molecules could compromise brain development and communication between nerve cells.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Assistive Technology/AAC in the News: Device Helps Children With Disabilities Access Tablets

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Imagine not being able to touch a touch-screen device. Tablets and smartphones - with all their educational, entertaining and social benefits - would be useless.

 

Researchers at Georgia Tech are trying to open the world of tablets to children whose limited mobility makes it difficult for them to perform the common pinch and swipe gestures required to control the devices.

 

Ayanna Howard, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and graduate student Hae Won Park have created Access4Kids, a wireless input device that uses a sensor system to translate physical movements into fine-motor gestures to control a tablet.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Pediatric Psychology in the News: Possible Clue to Children's Early Antisocial Behavior

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Both nature and nurture appear to be significant factors in early antisocial behaviors of adopted children, a Wayne State University researcher believes.

Christopher Trentacosta, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, recently examined data from 361 linked triads (birth mother, adoptive parents, adopted child) in order to assess externalizing behavioral problems such as aggression and defiance when children were 18, 27 and 54 months of age.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Pediatric Psychology in the News:  Psychological Therapies Improve Life for Children With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Study Suggests

[Source: Science Daily]

Children suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of traumatic events, including child abuse, may benefit from psychological therapies, according to a review published in The Cochrane Library. In the first systematic review of PTSD in young people, researchers found that children and teenagers diagnosed with PTSD showed signs of improvement up to three months following treatment and called for more studies to assess long-term benefits.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Neurobiology the News:  Rhesus Monkeys Cannot Hear the Beat in Music  

Beat induction, the ability to pick up regularity - the beat - from a varying rhythm, is not an ability that rhesus monkeys possess. These are the findings of researchers from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), which have recently been published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

 

The research conducted by Henkjan Honing, professor of Music Cognition at the UvA, and a team of neurobiologists headed by Hugo Merchant from the UNAM, shows that rhesus

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Fragile X in the News:  Fragile X Protein Linked to Nearly 100 Genes Involved in Autism  

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Doctors have known for many years that patients with fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, are often also diagnosed with autism. But little has been known about how the two diagnoses are related.

 

Now a collaborative research effort at Duke University Medical Center and Rockefeller University has pinpointed the precise genetic footprint that links the two. The findings, published online in the journal Nature on Dec. 12, 2012, point the way toward new genetic testing that could more precisely diagnose and categorize the spectrum of autism-related disorders.

 

  Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Brain Development in the News:  Key Gene for Brain Development    

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

About one in ten thousand babies is born with an abnormally small head. The cause for this disorder - which is known as microcephaly - is a defect in the development of the embryonic brain. Children with microcephaly are severely retarded and their life expectancy is low. Certain cases of autism and schizophrenia are also associated with the dysregulation of brain size.


 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  10 Sensory Winter / Christmas Activities   

Here is a blog post of sensory holiday activities that was extremely popular on our Pinterest boards last week.   Please enjoy "Sensory Christmas Crafts & Activities:"

 

[Source: Wonderbaby.org]

 

I've always felt that the best way to celebrate any holiday or season is with crafts!

Easter and spring have egg and flower crafts, autumn has natural crafts with colorful leaves and pokey pine cones, but winter and Christmas is the best time for crafts that engage all the senses.

 

 Access this Pin of the Week Through a Link our Blog

OT Activity of the Week:  Q-Tip Painting with Templates   

[Source:  Therapy Fun Zone]

 

I have posted about Q-tip painting before, but another therapist has a different twist on it.  She has made some templates to do the q-tip painting, which requires more precision in the painting.

This is a guest post by a therapist,  Tova Stulberger, who made some templates to use when Q-tip painting.

 

Instructions:
Kids dip Q-Tips into paint and press into a circle on paper- one dot per circle. This activity slows movements patterns because requires focus to dot inside of each circle. This activity is

 Read the Rest of this Post Through a Link our Blog

App Review of the Week:  What did Snakey eat? + Card game! 

by Jeremy Legaspi, MS CCC-SLP
This app review is reprinted with permission of the author as it appeared on The Speech Guy Blog.

What did Snakey eat?  is one of  my favorite apps right now. The purpose of the game is to figure out what Snakey ate. I love it because its very simple but you can use it to target a variety of areas. It can be used to answer yes/no questions, question formation, problems solving skills, and categories.  For $.99  this is a hands down must buy!

 

Read the Rest of this App Review Through a Link our Blog

Therapist Resource of the Week:  Cutting Through the Hype: Essential Social Media Tools for SLPs - A Guidebook  

Editor's Note:   Last week, we published our e-book "Essential Social Media Tools for SLPs, in blog hop format.     Here is the complete PDF of the book.   Please enjoy it with our compliments.  

 

The social media world is taking the SLP profession by storm.   As you are probably aware by now, Pinterest, Blogs, Twitter, and other social media platforms can be for far more than sharing baby pictures!   Used wisely, these technologies can be an indispensable part of your personal learning network and profoundly impact your effectiveness as a speech-language or audiology clinician.

 

  Please Download this Free E-Book Through a Link our Blog

SLP Corner:  Common Core Teacher Rating Scales for your Language Evaluations

by:  Ruth Morgan, CCC-SLP

 

Let me start by saying that I work with a fabulous bright group of SLPs in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools.  At least once a month we get together from across the school district and do so many necessary tasks:
  • case studies
  • discuss Medicaid rules and guidelines
  • peer review for student evaluations
  • talk about business (lots of this!)
  • problem-solve (yes, we do encounter problems)
  • attend continuing education
  • exchange information
  • celebrate weddings, retirements, babies
 Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: DSM-5 ASD Criteria Unlikely to Exclude Many Individuals

by Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP

 

The American Psychiatric Association voted to approve the revised fifth edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) on December 1, 2012. The manual is used by clinicians nationwide to diagnose mental health conditions and will be published in spring 2013. Among other changes, the revision introduces fundamental changes in the diagnosis of autism. It collapses the previously distinct autism subtypes, including autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder (syndrome), and pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) into a

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

OT Corner: I Have A Little Dreidel (An SPD Hanukkah 2012)  

[Source:  The SPD Blogger Network]

 

Happy Hanukkah!

 

It's my kids' favorite holiday, and we're getting ourselves ready for eight nights full of celebration. This year, Hanukkah starts at sundown on December 8th, so we've just barely had time to change gears from eating Thanksgiving turkey to decorating the house with dreidels and menorahs.

 

For those of you who don't know, Hanukkah is a celebration of the Jews' victory in a battle to reclaim their temple from the Syrian army. In order to rededicate their temple, the Jews needed oil to light their "eternal flame" candle. They thought they only had enough oil to burn for one day. However, a miracle occurred and the oil lasted for eight days, giving the Jews enough time to make more oil. This is why the holiday is called the "Festival of Lights" and is celebrated by lighting candles for eight nights.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Worth Repeating: How Can Co-morbidity With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?

by: Tomblin, J. Bruce; Mueller, Kathyrn L.   

 

This article provides a background for the topic of comorbidity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and spoken and written language and speech disorders that extends through this issue of Topics in Language Disorders. Comorbidity is common within developmental disorders and may be explained by many possible reasons. Some of these can be viewed as artifacts as simple as chance occurrence or because of the way that the research participants were sampled. If these  

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Also Worth Repeating: Is Gamification the Future of Teaching Life Skills?

by Linda Harrison

 

Last night I heard a CBC radio program describing "gamification", and my mind is buzzing with all the implications and applications of this idea. Gamification is the process of applying gaming principles and design to non-game situations.

 

People have always been drawn to games. There is evidence of game-playing from ancient cultures. However, video games have brought gaming to a whole new level.

Gamification involves using strategies from gaming such as:

  • Awards/points/virtual currency/badges
  • progress bars
Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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