Friday, July 26, 2013
Issue 23, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Happy Friday!

Please enjoy our weekly newsletter offering
 
News Items:
 
  • Feel Good Video of the Week:  OT Problems: OT Students Rap about Occupational Therapy 
  • Scientists Figure Out How To Turn Off Down Syndrome in Laboratory
  • Breastfed Children Are Less Likely to Develop ADHD Later in Life, Study Suggests
  • A Unique Pathway Identified in the Human Brain Allows us to Learn New Words
  • China is Failing Many of Its Disabled Children  
  • Another Feel Good Story of the Week:  Marino Foundation Helping Those with Autism, Other Developmental Disabilities Find Jobs  
  • The Anesthetic Ketamine Can Adversely Affect Children's Learning and Memory Ability

 

PediaStaff News
  • PediaStaff Therapist Placement of the Week: Congratulations, Robin P.
  • Featured Job of the Week:  Pediatric Occupational Therapist, Claremont, California 
Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Autism Resource of the Week: 15 Indispensable Websites for Parents of Children with Autism
  • Book Review: "Your Brain on Childhood: The Unexpected Side Effects of Classrooms, Ballparks, Family Rooms, and the Minivan"  
  • App of the Week: Language & Vocabulary on Sims FreePlay for iPad

Articles and Special Features 

  • Pediatric Therapy Corner:  The "Focus Game" Worksheet as a Fun Way to Teach Children Attention Skills
  • SLP Corner: Adapted Books
  • OT Corner:  10 Ways to Use Popsicle Sticks to Build School-Readiness Skills  
  • Worth Repeating: The Debate Over Sensory Processing  
  • Also Worth Repeating: Stuffed Allies and Dignity: How Understanding Anxiety Can Save the Day 
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





The Career Center

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Recent Occupational Therapist and COTA Jobs 

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Feel Good Video of the Week:  OT Problems: OT Students Rap about Occupational Therapy

Thanks to Katherine Collmer of Handwriting with Katherine and the Google+ group OT ToolBox for sharing this fun production!!

  Watch this Video on our Blog

Down Syndrome in the News: Scientists Figure Out How To Turn Off Down Syndrome in Laboratory

[Source: CBS]

 

Scientists have successfully turned off the chromosome defect that causes Down syndrome.

Down syndrome, also called Trisomy 21, is a genetic condition in which a person has three copies of chromosome 21, resulting in 47 chromosomes instead of 46. It is one of the most common causes of human birth defects. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome had an incidence rate of 11.8 babies per 10,000 live births from 1999 to 2003.

 

While gene therapy has been used to fix defective genes, this is the first time scientists were able to completely shut off an entire chromosome, they said.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

ADHD in the News:  Breastfed Children Are Less Likely to Develop ADHD Later in Life, Study Suggests 

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

We know that breastfeeding has a positive impact on child development and health - including protection against illness. Now researchers from Tel Aviv University have shown that breastfeeding may also help protect against Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioral disorder in children and adolescents.

Seeking to determine if the development of ADHD was associated with lower rates of breastfeeding, Dr. Aviva Mimouni-Bloch, of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of the Child Neurodevelopmental Center in Loewenstein Hospital, and her fellow researchers completed a

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Vocabulary Development in the News:  A Unique Pathway Identified in the Human Brain Allows us to Learn New Words 

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

For the first time scientists have identified how a pathway in the brain which is unique to humans allows us to learn new words.

 

The average adult's vocabulary consists of about 30,000 words. This ability seems unique to humans as even the species closest to us -- chimps -- manage to learn no more than 100.

 

It has long been believed that language learning depends on the integration of hearing and repeating words but the neural mechanisms behind learning new words remained unclear.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Disability Around the World in the News:  China is Failing Many of Its Disabled Children    

[Source:  Care2.com]

 

China's students routinely score among the highest on international tests, leading the U.S. and other nations to ask, what does the Chinese education system do that we do not?

As a just-released report from Human Rights Watch shows, one thing that China fails to do is to educate students with disabilities.

83 million people with disabilities live in China. On paper, China recognizes their rights and, in particular, the imperative of providing them with an education. In 2008, the Chinese government ratified the

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Another Feel Good Story of the Week:  Marino Foundation Helping Those with Autism, Other Developmental Disabilities Find Jobs   

Thank you to our own recruiter, Lauren Marino for recommending this article!

 

[Source:  Miami Sun Sentinel]

 

If finding a job is tough for any young adult in South Florida these days, imagine the challenge for those with autism and other developmental disabilities.

 

The Dan Marino Foundation is starting a program to reduce those hurdles.

 

A new jobs-development program will allow high school graduates with autism and other developmental disabilities to obtain college-level skills and internships to secure work.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Dangers of Anesthesia in the News:  The Anesthetic Ketamine Can Adversely Affect Children's Learning and Memory Ability  

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

Recent studies have found that anesthesia drugs have neurotoxicity on the developing neurons, causing learning and memory disorders and behavioral abnormalities.

 

Ketamine is commonly used in pediatric anesthesia. A clinical retrospective study found that children below 3 years old who receive a long time surgery, or because of surgery require ketamine repeatedly, will exhibit the performance of school-age learning and memory disorders and behavioral abnormalities.


 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

PediaStaff Therapy Placement of the Week:  Congratulations, Robin P.   

Congrats to speech-language pathologist Robin P, on her new assignment in Oregon with PediaStaff.   She has worked for us for several years (and joined us on our booth at ASHA a couple of times!) but this is a brand new opportunity for Robin.

 

She will be working full time, mostly in two elementary schools plus plus a smaller number of middle and high school hours.

 

Have a great year, Robin!

PediaStaff Featured Job of the Week:  Pediatric Occupational Therapist, Claremont, California   

Our client is a center based facility who provides early intervention and school age rehabilitation to children.  Treatment is a collaborative effort involving the child, family, rehabilitation team as well as the child's educational team. We are seeking a full or part time Occupational Therapist to work both in the clinic and in a school setting.  Experience and desire to work with children with moderate - severe disabilities is appreciated.

 

Part time rate is $50.00/hour; $38-40.00/hour with benefits.   Qualifications: Must hold a Bachelor's Degree or higher in Occupational Therapy; a current state license (or eligible) if applicable.

 

 Apply For This Job or Any of Our Jobs Through a Link on our Blog

Autism Resource of the Week:  15 Indispensable Websites for Parents of Children with Autism   

[Source:  Friendship Circle]

 

According to the latest statistics, 1 in 88 children are on the autistic spectrum, including 1 in 54 boys. It's a disorder that's still not entirely understood, and even within the community of parents of children with autism and educators who work with them, there are still disagreements about what therapies and treatments work best.

For parents, finding ways to help with everything from diagnosis to coping is vital. Here's a list of 15 great resources  that parents of children with autism should be aware of:

 

 Read This List on our Blog

Book Review:  "Your Brain on Childhood: The Unexpected Side Effects of Classrooms, Ballparks, Family Rooms, and the Minivan" 

[Source:  All Kinds of Minds]

We love Gabrielle Principe's book, "Your Brain on Childhood: The Unexpected Side Effects of Classrooms, Ballparks, Family Rooms, and the Minivan." Not only is her storytelling engaging and creative, it is also peppered with so much research that one almost needs an organizational chart to keep track of it all.

While it is largely geared toward exploring the cognitive development of younger children, her framework for thinking about brains offers a compelling contrast to the current paradigm for understanding learning (performance on academic focused standardized tests) for all youth, and even adults.

 

  Read the Rest of this Book Review Through a Link on our Blog

App Review of the Week:  Language & Vocabulary on Sims FreePlay for iPad   

[Source: GeekSLP.com]

On the Episode #7 of GeekSLP TV recorded in 2010, I talked about my favorite computer game for promoting language skills: The Sims. Since then, EA Games has released the iPad version of the game called Sims Free Play. I have played the game a few times, and despite the fact that it is not even close to as flexible and powerful as the computer version, the Sims Free Play can be one great game for promoting language skills and vocabulary. This app contains rich graphics without any real verbal language; this way therapists and parents can have the opportunity to elicit language at any time. Many goals, particularly verbs can be targeted in the context with a fully animated visual aid.

 

Read the Rest of this App Review Through a Link on our  Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: The "Focus Game" Worksheet as a Fun Way to Teach Children Attention Skills

by Stephanie Brown Certified School Psychologist

 

If there was a list of the top ten phrases adults repeatedly say to young children, "Pay Attention!" would surely top it. Unfortunately, when it comes to young learners, pay attention can be a vague phrase used to communicate a pretty complex concept. When we think about it, the phrase pay attention is often used to replace several different commands all at once, like:

 

Sit in your seat
Keep your eyes on your work
Use the materials in front of you
Put your feet on the ground
Look at me when I'm speaking

 Read the Rest of This Article and Get Download on our Blog

SLP Corner: Adapted Books 

by Peg Hutson-Nechkash, M.S., CCC-SLP

 

Exposure to books and interacting with print are goals for many of our students with special needs. Adapted books provide hours of fun and meet treatment goals for students of all ages.

Adapted books are adaptations made to children's literature and stories to make books more accessible and understandable for all students.  Adaptations to books may include: using voice output devices, reducing visual distractions on pages, using props to accompany a story, providing picture symbols to place on pages, scanning a book to view on a computer screen or adding Popsicle sticks or large paper clips along the side to help with turning pages. These are just a few of the ways that books can be adapted.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog and Download a Free Adapted Book

OT Corner: 10 Ways to Use Popsicle Sticks to Build School-Readiness Skills

by Dana Moore, OTR/L

 

There are so many ways to use popsicle sticks for craft projects.  But did you also know that they can be great tools for building school-readiness skills?  Check out these easy ways to use popsicle sticks to prepare your little one for reading, writing, and academic success!

 

1) Spacing Buddy:  First have your child decorate his popsicle stick.  The children I work with often like to create little friends on their sticks.  Then use them to help your child learn how to space between their words.  Your child can start by using the stick as a spacer during writing and then later transition to using it as a way to check their work after spacing independently.   

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Worth Repeating: The Debate Over Sensory Processing

[Source:  The Chid Mind Institute]

 

by Beth Arky

 

Jodi and Matt were mystified. At 2, their son, Paul, was behaving in ways no parenting book had described: knocking into walls, hugging them to the point of hurting, and screaming inexplicably in restaurants. He was strangely tentative when climbing or balancing on the playground equipment. Instead, he always rushed for the swings, which he loved pushing as much as he loved being pushed in.


Also Worth Repeating: Stuffed Allies and Dignity: How Understanding Anxiety Can Save the Day


Thanks so much to our clinical coordinator Joleen Fernald for recommending this article!

 

[Source:  Asperkids.com]

  

The year was 1982.  Ronald Reagan was in office. "Don't You Want Me, Baby?" was on the radio, and the smiley face emoticon was born.  But, like, what I most clearly remember about, like, that year isn't valley girl speech or, like, Ms. PacMan.  It is E.T., the Reeses-pieces eating alien who I was absolutely sure was hiding in my closet.  

Try as they might to counter my certainty that there was not, in fact, an extraterrestrial lurking in my bedroom, my parents couldn't convince me otherwise.  So I clutched my teddy bear for reassurance, and sat there in my bed - scared.  Now, I'm not talking nervous or "trying to sneak into bed with Mom & Dad" scared. No, I mean to the pit of stomach, cold sweat, freak out if you touch me terrified.    

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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