April 26, 2013
Monthly Edition 
Issue 4, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Happy Friday

Please enjoy the April Monthly issue of our newsletter.   Are you reading this in San Diego at the AOTA convention?  If so, please stop by our booth #1022 and say hi!
 
News Items:
 
  • Bad Behavior in Kids With Hearing Implants Doesn't Predict Slowed Language Development
  • Drug Could Improve Working Memory of People With Autism, Study Finds
  • Why Do Babies Calm Down When They Are Carried?
  • Link Studied Between Early Social Experiences And Adolescent Brain Function
  • SLPs, OTs, PTs, and Audiologists Ranked by WSJ Amongst Top Jobs of 2013
  • Oropharyngeal Dysphagia, Gross Motor Skills and Cerebral Palsy
  • Computer Game Could Improve Sight of Visually Impaired Children
  • Intractable Seizures Halted With Experimental Treatment for Rare Pediatric 'Pretzel Syndrome'

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week: Springtime Preposition Bingo
  • PT Activities of the Week: 5 Gross Motor Activities with Painter's Tape
  • App Review of the Week: Describe with Art
  • Book Review of the Week: The Ant and the Grasshopper, A Lesson in Descriptive Language for Speech Therapy

Articles and Special Features 

  • OT Corner: 10 Art Projects for Kids with Sensory Issues
  • Focus on Bilingualism:  When Culture and Therapy Clash
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner:  Working in an Interdisciplinary World
  • Worth Repeating: The Effects of Separation on Attachment
  • Also Worth Repeating: Journal Review: Stuttering in School-Age Children: A Call for Treatment Research
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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Cochlear Implants in the News:  Bad Behavior in Kids With Hearing Implants Doesn't Predict Slowed Language Development

[Source: Science Daily]

 

A new study presented today at the 48th Annual American Neurotology Society spring meeting is challenging a long held belief among speech therapists and audiologists that bad behavior in young children with hearing implants is an indicator of device failure and a predictor of poor language development.

 

Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a longitudinal study of children with hearing loss, including some with cochlear implants. From the ages of 18 to 48 months, no consistent correlation was found between bad behaviors like aggression or inattentiveness and delayed language acquisition for the children with implants.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Autism Research in the News: Drug Could Improve Working Memory of People With Autism, Study Finds

[Source: Science Daily.com]

 

People with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often have trouble communicating and interacting with others because they process language, facial expressions and social cues differently. Previously, researchers found that propranolol, a drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure, anxiety and panic, could improve the language abilities and social functioning of people with an ASD. Now, University of Missouri investigators say the prescription drug also could help improve the working memory abilities of individuals with autism.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Sensory Development in the News:  Why Do Babies Calm Down When They Are Carried?   

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Parents know that crying babies usually calm down when they are picked up and carried, but why is that? In a study published today, researchers from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute show that human babies and mouse pups alike automatically relax deeply when they are carried.

 

Their study, published in the journal Current Biology, is the first one to demonstrate that the infant calming response to maternal carrying is a coordinated set of nervous, motor and cardiac regulations. Kumi Kuroda and colleagues Gianluca Esposito and Sachine Yoshida, who carried out the research, propose that it might be an evolutionarily conserved, and essential, component of mother-infant interaction.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Research on Social Experience in the News:  Link Studied Between Early Social Experiences And Adolescent Brain Function 

[Source: Medical News Today]

 

Brains develop in the context of experience. Social experiences may be particularly relevant for developing neural circuits related to the experience of feeling or emotion. Factors such as negative life events and the quality of relationships may be especially influential.

 

Adolescence is a key time to investigate how early social experiences contribute to brain development because it's a period of dramatic changes in brain function, brain structure, and social context, and it's when many psychiatric disorders first appear. But few studies have addressed this important area

 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Therapy Careers in the News:  SLPs, OTs, PTs, and Audiologists Ranked by WSJ Amongst Top Jobs of 2013 

[Source:  Wall Street Journal]

 

CareerCast.com, a career website, ranked 200 jobs from best to worst based on five criteria: physical demands, work environment, income, stress, and hiring outlook. To compile its list, the firm primarily used data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and other government agencies. From actuary to newspaper reporter, see the complete list, and search for your job.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in the News:  Oropharyngeal Dysphagia, Gross Motor Skills and Cerebral Palsy   

[Source: Your Therapy Source]

 

Pediatrics published research on the relationship between oropharyngeal dysphagia and gross motor skills in children with cerebral palsy. A cross sectional population based study was done in Queensland with children ages 18-36 months with a confirmed diagnosis of cerebral palsy. Using various assessments for oropharyngeal dysphagia and gross motor skill level the following results were reported:

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Technology in the News:  Computer Game Could Improve Sight of Visually Impaired Children    

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Visually impaired children could benefit from a revolutionary new computer game being developed by a team of neuroscientists and game designers.

 

Academics from the University of Lincoln, UK, are working with WESC, one of the UK's most respected specialist schools for visually impaired children, to create and evaluate a new 'visual search rehabilitation game'.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Rare Disease/Disorder in the News:  Intractable Seizures Halted With Experimental Treatment for Rare Pediatric 'Pretzel Syndrome'    

[Source: Science Daily]

 

With a better understanding of underlying mechanisms that cause a rare neurodevelopmental disorder in the Old Order Mennonite population, referred to as Pretzel syndrome, a new study reports that five children were successfully treated with a drug that modifies the disease process, minimizing seizures and improving receptive language.

 

The study, by researchers including experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, appears in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog
'Here is a beautifully done bingo game from our friend, Ruth Morgan of Chapel Hill Snippets!  Please enjoy "Springtime Preposition Bingo"

 Download Springtime Preposition Bingo from a Link on our Blog

PT Activities of the Week: 5 Gross Motor Activities with Painter's Tape  

Here are 5 activities using painter's tape that encourage balance skills, jumping skills, motor planning, body awareness and aerobic fitness. 

App Review of the Week:  Describe with Art
[Source:  Carrie's Speech Corner]

Last week, I used two new apps by Virtual Speech Center in some of my therapy sessions:  Syntax Workout (see my review of that app HERE) and Describe With Art.  According to the Virtual Speech Center's website, Describe with Art was created by a certified speech and language pathologist.   It's

Book Review of the Week: The Ant and the Grasshopper, A Lesson in Descriptive Language for Speech Therapy   

[Source:  Play on Words]

Readers are drawn into the vibrant collage of colors on the first page of The Ant and the Grasshopper,  "Somewhere on the boulevard of backyards an ant was struggling with the remnants of a picnic." Each page is equally as rich, packed with delicious vocabulary for young minds. The ant grew weary dragging her chunk of watermelon hoping  for "the smallest

 

Read the Rest of this Book Review Through a Link on our Blog

OT Corner: 10 Art Projects for Kids with Sensory Issues

By Erin McNeill

 

Kids with sensory issues are sometimes resistant to art projects because they don't enjoy being messy or they don't enjoy touching the mediums that are squishy, wet, or are made up of smaller parts, such as sand or rice. If you want to engage your child in art projects, it's best to start with non-messy experiences for your child and build up to bigger projects. Go slowly and encourage your child to try new things, even if it's just for a very short time. Here are some projects and activities to get you started.


Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Focus on Bilingualism: When Culture and Therapy Clash

By: Lucy Windevoxhel, M.S., CCC-SLP

When I began my first job as a speech-language pathologist one  of my monolingual, monocultural colleagues asked me why Hispanics gave their children milk in a bottle well into their preschool years. I was certainly offended by her comment. Growing up in Venezuela I never remembered drinking from a bottle or seeing friends drinking from a bottle. I made sure to tell her that was a gross over generalization and I had no idea what she was talking about. Well, I have spent the last 12 years working with children in the South Florida area, and I have learned that although it is not true of all families, many of them, including Cuban, Venezuelan, Colombian and Nicaraguan families among others share the following characteristics:

 Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: Working in an Interdisciplinary World

By Krystal Vermeire, OTR/L

 

About a year ago I wrote an article for PediaStaff sharing my views on parent involvement in the occupational therapy world.  Today I would like to get you thinking about taking it a step further.  Actively involving parents in treatment sessions can help provide carry over at home, but what if the entire treatment team was working together and collaborating.  For many, this is an ideal, but what if we worked just a little harder to make it a reality.  A child's treatment team is often comprised of a wide variety of professionals across disciplines.  Rarely, if ever, is the entire treatment team part of one group located in one location.  This means parents, therapists, and other professionals have to make the extra effort to collaborate.


Worth Repeating: The Effects of Separation on Attachment

[Source:  Special Education Advisor]

 

by Christen Russell, MS, BCBA

 

Attachments are the ties that bind (i.e.: the connection with people interacted with and comforted by). When separation occurs, children become distressed when a preferred caregiver (whom they are attached to) leaves. In toddlers, the children also try to deter the preferred caregiver from departing. Crying, reaching for, approaching and climbing on the departing caregivers are common behaviors for children during this stage to display (Berk, 2010).

Worth Repeating: Journal Review: Stuttering in School-Age Children: A Call for Treatment Research

[Source:  Spirited Speech Pathology]

This evening I read Stuttering in School-Age Children: A Call for Treatment Research by Marilyn A. Nippold, PhD, and Editor. 2011

This article is short, sweet, informative and basically hands out a research idea for dysfluency on a silver platter! In a nutshell this article discusses the need for research on therapy intervention for fluency for school-age children. I cannot agree more!

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