May 3, 2013
Weekly Edition 
Issue 13, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Happy Friday 

Please enjoy this week's newsletter with our complements.

News Items:
 
  • Child Development: Early Walker or Late Walker of Little Consequence
  • Gaze Shifting Delay Has Potential To Diagnose Autism At 7 Months
  • Maryland gym showcases special-needs teams
  • A Newborn's Placenta Can Predict Risk For Autism  
  • Ice Hockey Causes 44.3% Of All Traumatic Brain Injuries Among Canadian Kids
  • Cerebral Palsy is Hilarious - According to This 14 Year Old Comedian! 
  • Handedness and ADHD 
  • Toddlers' Aggressive Behavior May Be Predicted By Their Sweat Response In Infancy
  • Reading Wordless Storybooks to Toddlers May Expose Them to Richer Language

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • Therapy Resource of the Week: Autism and Legos�
  • OT Activity of the Week:   Sensory Bottles 
  • App Review of the Week: Multiple Choice Articulation
  • Book Review:  Language Lesson Making Comparisons "What If You Had Animal Teeth?"  

Articles and Special Features 

  • Pediatric Therapy Corner:  10 Ideas to Get Parents More Involved
  • SLP Clients' Corner:  (Video) Dyslexia Doesn't Define Me 
  • OT Corner: Handwriting Mastery Begins Before the Introduction of a Pencil
  • Worth Repeating: Raising Children with Down Syndrome in Japan
  • Also Worth Repeating: The Psychology of Language: Why Are Some Words More Persuasive Than Others?
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Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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Gross Motor Development in the News:  Early Walker or Late Walker of Little Consequence

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

On average, children take the first steps on their own at the age of 12 months. Many parents perceive this event as a decisive turning point. However, the timing is really of no consequence. Children who start walking early turn out later to be neither more intelligent nor more well-coordinated. This is the conclusion reached by a study supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF).

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Autism Research in the News: Gaze Shifting Delay Has Potential To Diagnose Autism At 7 Months

[Source: Medical News Today]

 

At 7 months of age, children who are later diagnosed with autism take a split second longer to shift their gaze during a task measuring eye movements and visual attention than do typically developing infants of the same age, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Feel Good Story of the Week:  Maryland Gym Showcases Special-Needs Teams   

[Source:  Maryland Gazette]

Chris Brown never thought any of her daughters would be involved in cheerleading. She thought that world was full of short skirts and superficial girls.

 

But Brown changed her mind when cheerleading became a life-altering experience for her daughter, who has Down syndrome.

 

Four years ago, Brown enrolled Laila in the Storm Chasers, one of two special-needs teams run by Maryland Twisters, a competitive cheerleading gym.

 

"It's been wonderful because she is able to have the confidence," Brown said. "It amazed me that they were able to teach them the routine, the discipline and for her be able to get in front of an entire stadium and perform a cheer."

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

More Autism Research in the News: Study: Infant's Risk of Developing Autism Provided by Placenta

[Source:  UPI.com]


U.S. researchers say they have developed a way to measure an infant's risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his or her placenta at birth.  

 

Senior author Dr. Harvey Kliman, research scientist in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at the Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues at the MIND Institute at the University of California, Davis, said the finding allows for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Pediatric TBI in the News:  Ice Hockey Causes 44.3% Of All Traumatic Brain Injuries Among Canadian Kids 

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

Nearly half of all traumatic brain injuries among children in Canada who needed to be taken to an emergency department are caused by ice hockey, researchers from St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, reported in the journal PLOS ONE.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Feel Good Story of the Week:  Cerebral Palsy is Hilarious, According to This 14 Year Old Boy

[Source: Take Part.com]

 

Jack Carroll would rather laugh about his disability than hide it.

 

Jack Carroll is a 14-year-old stand-up comedian. He also happens to have cerebral palsy, which is the central theme of his act.

 

The teen recently appeared on the television show Britain's Got Talent, and received a standing ovation. But it's not because he's "good for a kid,"-he's just talented. And fearless. 

 
Read the Rest of this Article, Watch Jack's Auditon and Read a Great Editorial by Ellen Seidman Through a Link our Blog

ADHD in the News:  Handedness and ADHD 

[Source: Your Therapy Source]

The Journal of Attention Disorders published research on hand preference and its association with ADHD, severity symptoms, age, gender, comorbid psychiatric problems, or parental characteristics. Participants included 520 children (mean age of 9.04 years). Each subject was assessed for handedness, inattention severity, hyperactivity severity, oppositional behavior symptoms, anxiety 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Toddlers and Aggression in the News:  Toddlers' Aggressive Behavior May Be Predicted By Their Sweat Response In Infancy 

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

Infants who sweat less in response to scary situations at age 1 show more physical and verbal aggression at age 3, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

 

Lower levels of sweat, as measured by skin conductance activity (SCA), have been linked with conduct disorder and aggressive behavior in children and adolescents. Researchers hypothesize that aggressive children may not experience as strong of an emotional response to fearful situations as their less

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Language Development in the News:  Reading Wordless Storybooks to Toddlers May Expose Them to Richer Language  

[Source: Science Daily.com]

 

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have found that children hear more complex language from parents when they read a storybook with only pictures compared to a picture-vocabulary book. The findings appear in the latest issue of the journal First Language.

 

"Too often, parents dismiss picture storybooks, especially when they are wordless, as not real reading or just for fun," said the study's author, Professor Daniela O'Neill. "But these findings show that reading picture storybooks with kids exposes them to the kind of talk that is really important for children to hear, especially as they transition to school."

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Therapy Resource of the Week:  Autism and Legos�   

[Source:  The Autism News]

 

Autism Live Host, Shannon Penrod shares the many lovely ways Lego� bricks can help children on the Autism spectrum gain new skills. Young children can start with DUPLO� blocks to learn colors, sorting, building, cause and effect and work on fine motor skills. Older children can use traditional bricks to build, follow directions and create all the while honing hand and finger skills; eventually children can

 

Watch this Video on our Blog

OT Activity of the Week:  Sensory Bottles 

[Source:  Frogs and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails]

We love making and then playing with sensory bottles.  These are bottles with fun items inside for the kids to look at.  If they turn them upside down they get to watch as the items move in the water.  The picture above shows you what we used for the sensory bottles.  I like to get my supplies ready for crafts and activities when I can for the boys before I get them to help or play.  That is what I did this day.  Once I had all we needed I let them add the items to the bottles themselves.

 

 Learn More About this Activity Through a Link on our Blog

App Review of the Week:  App Review of the Week: Multiple Choice Articulation   

by Danielle Reed

 

To say that artic therapy can get bland quickly would be an understatement!  I am constantly wracking my brain trying to find a new and fun way to target sentence and conversation levels.  Particularly for my oh-so-cool 3rd and 4th graders!

 

So, when I was offered the opportunity to try out Erik X. Raj's Multiple Choice Articulation app, I was very excited to check it out!  (maybe even giddy... I like apps & they like me)  Erik is a

 

Learn More About this App on our Blog

Book Review:  Language Lesson Making Comparisons "What If You Had Animal Teeth?"   

[Source:  Play on Words.com]

"What If You Had Animal Teeth?" by Sandra Markle has the right combination of goofy comparisons, outrageous illustrations and fascinating animal facts to appeal to kids. Open the book and you are greeted with a child's open mouth with the two front teeth missing. Just what WOULD happen if an animal's teeth grew in, instead? On each double spread page, the left side introduces kids to a toothy animal like the beaver, great white shark or rattlesnake, while the right hand page illustrates similar

 

Read the Rest of this Book Review on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: 10 Ideas to Get Parents More Involved

Editor's Note: It's springtime, Time to wind down this year, but also to think about how you will improve your own classroom this coming school year!  Here is a great article that our friend Margaret Rice at Your Therapy Source wrote that is perfect for summertime planning.

by Margaret Rice, PT

Getting parents involved with occupational and physical therapy at school can be very beneficial for carry over of therapeutic activities outside of school time. Here are 10 ideas to get parents more involved:

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

SLP Client's Corner:  (Video) Dyslexia Doesn't Define Me

TED Youth Talk by Piper Otterbein

"I did everything I could to try to graduate"  Growing up with dyslexia, Piper Otterbein struggled to master things like learning multiplication tables and reading books. But now, as a high school graduate, she's realized that the best path in life is to harness the creative powers she already has.

 

Watch this TED Talk (7:13 in Length) on our Blog

OT Corner: Handwriting Mastery Begins Before the Introduction of a Pencil

by Katherine Collmer

Article reprinted with permission of the author and the Mama OT blog as it originally appeared on April 1, 2013  

 

Hello, everyone! I am thrilled to be a guest blogger on Christie's awesome site, Mama OT! It is an honor to have been included among the impressive authors and offerings you can find here.

Let me start by asking the question, "Why do we care about handwriting?"

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Worth Repeating: Raising Children with Down Syndrome in Japan

[Source:  Special Ed Post]

by Masami Ito

 

On a chilly afternoon in early spring, Mayumi Mitogawa, 52, and her 14-year-old son, Yutaka, sat together on a bench, getting ready to have their picture taken. He jokingly made a face and tried to push her out of the way, showing a hint of the shyness common to teens about being seen with their mom.

 

"He just loves to make people laugh," Mitogawa said, smiling affectionately at her son - who was born with trisomy 21, which causes Down syndrome - as he fooled around mimicking the motions of famous Japanese comedians. "I know that some people refer to children with Down syndrome as angels, but I don't see my son like that. He is just human."

 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Also Worth Repeating: The Psychology of Language: Why Are Some Words More Persuasive Than Others?

Thanks to our Twitter friend Brian Goldstein at LaSalle University for sharing this Article!!
 
[Source: Lifehacker.com]

by Leo Widrich

 

What's actually going on in the brain when it processes language? And if words affect the mind in different ways, are some more persuasive than others? Buffer cofounder Leo Widrich dives into what the research has to say about this and more.

 

Here's a secret right off the bat and I hope it isn't too odd: one of the things I fuss about a lot, especially for Buffer copy (for example our welcome email if you sign up!) are words-very simple words, in fact. Should it say "Hi" or "Hey"? Should it be "cheers" or "thanks"? How about "but" or "and"? I'm guessing you might have a similar obsession with this. There are many occasions when [my Buffer partner] Joel and I sit over one line and change it multiple 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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