July 12, 2013
Weekly Edition 
Issue 21, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Hello There! 

Please enjoy our weekly newsletter offering!
 
News Items:
  • Stem Cells Improve Function In Newly-Paralyzed Rats
  • Brain Activity in Sleep May Impact Emotional Disturbances in Children With ADHD
  • Breakthrough Study Reveals Biological Basis for Sensory Processing Disorders in Kids
  • Children With ADHD More Likely to Be Moderately Disabled After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Mother's Antibodies May Explain a Quarter of Autism Cases
  • Identification Of Brain Regions Involved In Impersonations And Accents Could Impact Recovery From Brain Injury And Stroke
  • Later Cord Clamping After Birth Increases Iron Levels in Babies 
  • Pre-Eclampsia Poses Cerebral Palsy Risk For Premature And Small Babies
PediaStaff News
  • PediaStaff Therapy Placement of the Week: Congratulations, Kimberly!  
  • Going to ASHA Schools? Visit Booth #311 to Meet our Friends at Social Express and to Get (Another?) Toobaloo!  
Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • SLP Resource of the Week: TED Talk Playlist 'Words, Words, Words"
  • Resource of the Week: A History of Disability In America: An Awesome Online Exhibit
  • Product Review: Tobbles Promote Balance and Coordination While Providing Loads of Fun
  • Resource of the Week:  LessonPix Sharing Center 

Articles and Special Features 

  • OT Corner: Teaching Kids with Autism and Other Disabilities to Type
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: Stop Penalizing Boys for Not Being Able to Sit Still at School
  • SLP Corner:  When You and Your Team are the Target  
  • Worth Repeating: How Birds and Babies Learn to Talk
  • Also Worth Repeating: ADHD and Executive Functioning Resource Guide 
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Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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Paralysis Research in the News:  Stem Cells Improve Function In Newly-Paralyzed Rats

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

Neuralstem, Inc.  announced that a paper published today in the journal, STEM CELL RESEARCH AND THERAPY, showed that rats transplanted with its spinal cord-derived human neural stem cells, NSI-566, three days after a spinal cord injury at L3 (lumbar 3), showed improvement along several measures of motor function and a reduction of spasticity. The study, "Amelioration of Motor/Sensory Dysfunction and Spasticity in a Rat Model of Acute Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury by Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation," was led by principal investigator, Martin Marsala, MD, of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.  

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

ADHD Research in the News: Brain Activity in Sleep May Impact Emotional Disturbances in Children With ADHD

[Source:  Science Daily.com]

 

Sleep consolidates emotional memories in healthy children but not in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to research published May 29 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Prehn-Kristensen and colleagues from University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein. The study suggests these deficits in sleep-related emotional processing may exacerbate emotional problems experienced in the daytime by children with ADHD.


Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

SPD in the News:  Breakthrough Study Reveals Biological Basis for Sensory Processing Disorders in Kids   

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Sensory processing disorders (SPD) are more prevalent in children than autism and as common as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, yet it receives far less attention partly because it's never been recognized as a distinct disease.

 

In a groundbreaking new study from UC San Francisco, researchers have found that children affected with SPD have quantifiable differences in brain structure, for the first time showing a biological basis for the disease that sets it apart from other neurodevelopmental disorders.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

ADHD and TBI in the News:  Children With ADHD More Likely to Be Moderately Disabled After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury  

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Chicago have found that children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to demonstrate a moderate disability after sustaining a mild traumatic brain injury than children without ADHD.

  

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Genetic Links to Autism in the News:  Mother's Antibodies May Explain a Quarter of Autism Cases  

[Source: Time Magazine]

A test for six antibodies in an expectant mom's blood may predict with more than 99% certainty which children are at highest risk of developing autism.

In a study published in Translational Psychiatry, researchers report that 23% of all cases of autism may result from the presence of maternal antibodies that interfere with fetal brain development during pregnancy. The work builds on a 2008 study from the same scientists that first described the group of antibodies in mothers-to-be. The latest paper describes the specific antibodies and provides more detail on what they do.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

TBI in the News:  Identification Of Brain Regions Involved In Impersonations And Accents Could Impact Recovery From Brain Injury And Stroke   

[Source:  Medical News Today]

 

A study, led by Royal Holloway University researcher Carolyn McGettigan, has identified the brain regions and interactions involved in impersonations and accents.

 

Using an fMRI scanner, the team asked participants, all non-professional impressionists, to repeatedly recite the opening lines of a familiar nursery rhyme either with their normal voice, by impersonating individuals, or by impersonating regional and foreign accents of English.

 

They found that when a voice is deliberately changed, it brings the left anterior insula and

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Childbirth in the News:  Later Cord Clamping After Birth Increases Iron Levels in Babies     

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Delaying clamping of the umbilical cord after birth benefits newborn babies, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library. The authors found babies' blood and iron levels were healthier when the cord was clamped later.

 

In many high income countries, it is standard practice to clamp the umbilical cord connecting mother and baby less than a minute after birth. However, clamping the cord too soon may

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Cerebral Palsy in the News:  Pre-Eclampsia Poses Cerebral Palsy Risk For Premature And Small Babies    

[Source: Medical News Today]

Exposure to pre-eclampsia is associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in newborns, if they are preterm or small at birth, suggests a study published today on bmj.com.

 

Pre-eclampsia affects 3-5% of pregnant women and can lead to preterm delivery, prematurity, perinatal morbidity and mortality. Although preterm birth and low birth weight are associated with excess risk of CP, the causes remain largely unknown.

 

Some studies have found an excess risk of CP in children born at term from mothers with pre-eclampsia while others have reported no association.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

PediaStaff Therapy Placement of the Week:  Congratulations, Kimberly!   

Congratulations to Kimberly C., OTR/L on her full-time, direct hire position through PediaStaff at a year-round private school (with outstanding benefits!) in west suburban Boston.

 

Kim will be serving kids with mental health issues, autism, developmental disabilities, and emotional and behavioral challenges.  Much of the work will be sensory oriented in individual and group settings.

 

Sounds great, Kim!  Best of luck to you there!


Going to ASHA Schools?:  Visit Booth #311 to Meet our Friends at Social Express and to Get (Another?) Toobaloo!   

Are you going to the ASHA Schools Conference this weekend? PediaStaff won't be there in person, but we will be there in spirit (via Toobaloos and bags) at the Social Express Booth #311. Please visit Social Express to say hi, try their product, and enter to win a free copy!

SLP Resource of the Week:  TED Talk Playlist 'Words, Words, Words"   

[Source:  Reading Rockets]

TED playlists were a new concept to me. As the name suggests, talks on similar topics are gathered together to form a playlist. One playlist is called Words, Words, Words, and it contains talks on several topics related to words.

For me, one highlight on Words, Words, Words is a talk given by linguist John McWhorter called "Txting is killing language. JK." In his talk, McWhorter encourages us to think about email and text messaging

 

 Learn More About / Access this Playlist Through a Link on our Blog

Resource of the Week: A History of Disability In America: An Awesome Online Exhibit   

[Source: To the Max]

"Any person who is diseased, maimed, mutilated, or in any way deformed so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object, or an improper person to be allowed in or on the streets, highways, thoroughfares or public places in the City of County of San Francisco, shall not therein or thereon expose himself or herself to public view."

 

 Learn More About / Visit this Exhibit Through a Link on our Blog

Product Review of the Week:  Tobbles Promote Balance and Coordination While Providing Loads of Fun   

[Source Specialism]

What would you call six colorful, weighted spheres with two textures? How about Tobbles?

Tobbles are a twist on traditional building blocks that allow children to stack, spin, balance, nest, and much more. The possibilities are endless.
A child's creativity is definitely challenged by the multiple ways they can use the pieces to build. The individual components are weighted allowing them to be stacked in all kinds of leaning arrangements.

 

 Read the Rest of this Product Review Through a Link on our Blog

Resource of the Week:  LessonPix Sharing Center   

Here is a great free resource from our friends over at LessonPix.

They have started a "sharing center" where LessonPix members can upload custom therapy materials they have made with the Lesson Pix software.  Check it out - its Free! 

 

This is a great product worth subscribing to, and the sharing center is a terrific way to see all the cool things you can do with the software. 

 

Access the LessonPIx Sharing Center Through a Link on our Blog

OT Corner: Teaching Kids with Autism and Other Disabilities to Type

[Source:  Pediatric Occupational Therapy Tips]

 

by Anne Zachry, OTR/L

 

When teaching students with disabilities to type, I've found that it's best if I teach them to type words or phrases that are meaningful to the student. For example, I worked with a student this past school year who was not one bit interested in typing, but he absolutely loved theraputty. He had been practicing typing his name for several weeks, but I couldn't get him interested in the task. Solution: I taught him to type "I want putty."


Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Pediatric Therapy Corner: Stop Penalizing Boys for Not Being Able to Sit Still at School

Thanks to Loren Shlaes, OTR/L for forwarding this excellent article.  Loren has written for PediaStaff several times on this subject both on our blog and on our behalf for Minds in Bloom.  Thanks, Loren for thinking of us again!

 

[Source:  The Atlantic]

 

by Jessical Lahey


This year's end-of-year paper purge in my middle school office revealed a startling pattern in my teaching practices: I discipline boys far more often than I discipline girls. Flipping through the pink and yellow slips-my school's system for communicating errant behavior to students, advisors, and parents-I found that I gave out nearly twice as many of these warnings to boys than I did to girls, and of the slips I handed out to boys, all but one was for disruptive classroom behavior.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

SLP Corner: When You and Your Team are the Target

by Ruth Morgan, MS CCC-SLP

 

"Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering."  - Yoda


One thing (among hundreds of things) that was not taught in grad school was how to deal with anger. Not an SLP's own anger, but the anger of parents directed towards school personnel. A speech pathologist may have followed an IEP to the letter, written appropriate notes, loved the child, consulted frequently with a teacher, conferenced with the parents-but still be confronted with anger. Perhaps another team member had slipped in their job, perhaps the child didn't make

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Worth Repeating: How Birds and Babies Learn to Talk

[Source:  The New Yorker]

Few things are harder to study than human language. The brains of living humans can only be studied indirectly, and language, unlike vision, has no analogue in the animal world. Vision scientists can study sight in monkeys using techniques like single-neuron recording. But monkeys don't talk.

However, in an article published today in Nature, a group of researchers, including myself,

Also Worth Repeating: ADHD and Executive Functioning Resource Guide

[Source: North Shore Pediatric Therapy]

Taking Charge of ADHD:  The Complete Authoritative Guide for Parents.  
Barkley, Russell (2013):
This book provides parents with evidence based interventions regarding ADHD.  It is well written and easily readable, while providing parents and practitioners with the latest research supported information regarding ADHD and various interventions.

Executive Skills in Children and Adolescents:  A Practical Guide to Assessment and

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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