September 6, 2013
Issue 29, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings!

That was a short week!  Please enjoy our newsletter offering and your weekend!
 
News Items:
  • A Potential Cause of Autism Discovered
  • Babies Learn to Recognize Words in the Womb
  • Primate Calls, Like Human Speech, Can Help Infants Form Categories
  • 8-Year Old English Boy, Who is Double Amputee, Flown to Clearwater to Swim with Winter the Dolphin
  • Newark Man with Down Syndrome Wins Respect Powerlifting
  • Internet Meme of the Week:  There is NO App for This!   
  • Treatment of Children With Cerebral Palsy Could Be Boosted
  • CASANA Accepting Applications for "iPads for Apraxia" Program 
PediaStaff News
  • PediaStaff Therapy Placement of the Week: Therapy Outdoors 
  • Have a Great Looking Therapy Room or Space? There is Still time to
    Submit a Picture of Yours!
Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • OT Activity of the Week: Eyedropper Painting for Pincer Grasp
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week!: Homemade Personal Game Pieces
  • SLP Activities of the Week: 5 Nursery Rhyme Ideas for Language Development
  • Featured App of the Week: The Brainstormer - Story Starter for Older Students

Articles and Special Features 

  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: Waiting Room Chaos in Pediatric Therapy
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner Too:  Reflections on Alaska...Where Life is Bigger Tales of a Seasoned OT Returning to the Frontier State
  • SLP Corner: Childhood Apraxia of Speech - Q&A for Clinicians
  • Worth Repeating: Top Pearls of Wisdom for SLP Newbies  
  • Also Worth Repeating: Introducing Switches and Augmentative Communication Devices to Very Young Children
Feel free to contact us with any questions about our openings or items in these pages. Have you discovered our RSS feed? Click on the orange button below to subscribe to all our openings and have them delivered to your Feed Reader!  Don't have an RSS Feed Reader set up? Sign up at Blogtrottr and have our blog posts delivered right to your email.

Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





The Career Center

The links to the right are "live" and reflect the most recent SLP, OT, PT and related assistant jobs, and ALL our Bilingual and School Psychology Jobs. 
Girl
To further narrow your search by state,
setting, bilingual, or term, use the
check boxes drop down menus.

If a particular search is returning
no hits it is possible that we do
not currently have new openings for
you with that selection criteria.

To see ALL our openings
click
HERE and further narrow your search.
Recent Occupational Therapist and COTA Jobs 

School Psychologist Jobs 

Autism in the News:  A Potential Cause of Autism Discovered

[Source:  Medical News Today]

Problems with a key group of enzymes called topoisomerases can have profound effects on the genetic machinery behind brain development and potentially lead to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research announced in the journal Nature. Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have described a finding that represents a significant advance in the hunt for environmental factors behind autism and lends new insights into the disorder's genetic causes.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Language Development in the News: Babies Learn to Recognize Words in the Womb

[Source ScienceMag.org]

 

Be careful what you say around a pregnant woman. As a fetus grows inside a mother's belly, it can hear sounds from the outside world-and can understand them well enough to retain memories of them after birth, according to new research. It may seem implausible that fetuses can listen to speech within the womb, but the sound-processing parts of their brain become active in the last trimester of pregnancy, and sound carries fairly well through the mother's abdomen. "If you put your hand over your mouth and

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Language Development in the News:  Primate Calls, Like Human Speech, Can Help Infants Form Categories   

[Source: Science Daily]

 

Human infants' responses to the vocalizations of non-human primates shed light on the developmental origin of a crucial link between human language and core cognitive capacities, a new study reports.

Previous studies have shown that even in infants too young to speak, listening to human speech supports core cognitive processes, including the formation of object categories.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Feel Good Story of the Week:  8-Year Old English Boy, Who is Double Amputee, Flown to Clearwater to Swim with Winter the Dolphin  

Editor's Note:  I saw this article on Sunday in our local paper.  So excited to see the story has been picked up world-wide]

 

[Source:  Tampa Bay Times]


Cieran Kelso sat quietly beside Winter, gently stroking the dolphin's back as a trainer slid a liner, then Winter's famed prosthetic tail, over her stump and secured it with a strap.

The 8-year-old boy could relate.

 

Cieran, a double amputee whose own custom-made prosthetic swim flippers made headlines in his native England, had performed a similar process countless times himself.

 

But on this morning, the experience was shared in a way Cieran never expected.

 

Local tourism officials flew Cieran and his family from England to Florida, surprising him with

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Down Syndrome in the News:  Newark Man with Down Syndrome Wins Respect Powerlifting  

Editor's Note:  What a wonderful inspiration to our young clients with Down Syndrome!!  And as @goatgeek on Instagram has pointed out, this young man is especially exceptional since people with Down Syndrome generally struggle with low-tone issues!  Go Jon!

 

[Source: DelawareOnline.com]

 

Sitting at the kitchen table in his family's Newark home, Jon Stoklosa comes across as a laid-back, almost shy guy. He answers questions with a word, preferring instead to look out the backyard window and let his parents, Hank and Liz, do the talking.

 

But the medal he clasps in his right hand offers a glimmer of the personality that hides beneath his sturdy 5-foot-5 frame.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Internet Meme of the Week:  There is NO App for This! 


I think this might just be the best meme ever!  Thanks to @Susan Vaughn Kratz on the Pediatric Occupational Therapists Group on FB for posting it!!

 

See this Great Visual on our Blog

Cerebral Palsy Treatment in the News:  Treatment of Children With Cerebral Palsy Could Be Boosted    

[Source: Science Daily]

Children with cerebral palsy could be helped to speak more clearly following research by a University of Strathclyde academic.

 

Dr Anja Kuschmann will analyze the speech patterns of young people affected by the condition, in an effort to understand more about why they can have difficulties talking.

 

Cerebral palsy (CP) is usually caused by an injury to the brain before, during or after birth. Children with CP have difficulties in controlling muscles and movements as they grow and develop.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Call For Applications:  CASANA Accepting Applications for "iPads for Apraxia" Program     

The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA) is accepting applications for its 2013 "iPads for Apraxia" program.  The program was initiated in 2011 and, to date, has provided iPads and protective cases to 115 children with severe apraxia of speech from low to moderate income families.  The use of this mobile technology has not only engaged and motivated children with apraxia of various ages, but its usage has led to increases in the amount of home practice on the children's speech therapy goals and skills.  Equally important, applications ("Apps") on the iPads enable their use as "talkers" or augmentative communication systems as the children continue to practice speaking

 Read the Rest of this Article on our Blog

PediaStaff Therapy Placements of the Week:  Therapy Outdoors   

Congratulations to Allison L. (SLP) and Lori W. (LPT) on their new positions with a wonderful pediatric therapy clinic in Illinois that they got through PediaStaff.

 

The client is a non profit provider of pediatric therapy and treats children of all ages with moderate to severe disabilities.   Allison and Lori will be working in a very supportive clinic atmosphere and will get an opportunity to work in a wonderful hippotherapy program.

 

Very cool positions, ladies. Enjoy!

Have A Great Looking Therapy Room or Space?  There is Still time to Submit a Picture of Yours!   

We are so very excited that as of this writing almost 60 pediatric and school-based therapists have contributed photos to our "myTxroom" photo exhibit.  There is still time to contribute a picture of yours.  Read further to learn more!

 

Next Friday, September 13th, we will feature a blog post with a link to our special pinboard on Pinterest that we have created just for this project.   The entire collection of photos will be available for viewing both on Pinterest and on Instagram.

 

Learn How You Can Participate on our Blog

OT Activity of the Week:  Eyedropper Painting for Pincer Grasp   

Here is another of our "greatest hits" on Pinterest that we shared on Instagram recently!
 

Eyedropper painting for pincer grasp.  Food coloring works great.
 

For a mural, put a plastic tablecloth under a paper tablecloth to save your table.  Paper towels and coffee filters (check out these coffee filter butterflies to make with these creations!) work great as do squares of white cloth bound with masking tape.

 

Learn More About this Activity on our Blog

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  Homemade Personal Game Pieces   

Thanks so much to Beverly Sinton our friend on Pinterest for sharing this photo!   Would love to give a shoutout to the original pinner as well, but the link on Pinterest leads to an empty blog.

As Beverly pointed out when she pinned this, not only would the kids love these for regular board games, but these would be great for role-playing social skills scenarios, and of course for story telling and pretend play.

 

 See This Great Idea on our Blog

SLP Activities of the Week:  5 Nursery Rhyme Ideas for Language Development   

by Lyn Goodwin, Speech Language Pathologist

Why teach nursery rhymes?

  • Nursery rhymes provide a foundation for literacy.
  • Children who know their nursery rhymes tend to have strong language skills.
  • Nursery rhymes help babies to develop listening skills and tune into rhyme and voice inflections.
  • They help babies to imitate hand gestures and sounds.
Nursery rhymes are best learned when they are practiced frequently and made fun. As your

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Featured App of the Week:  The Brainstormer - Story Starter for Older Students    

[Source: WeAreTeachers.com]

 

This iPad app generates high interest writing prompts for middle- and high-school students. The basic Brainstormer app has three wheels of words and themes to spin. Students can spin each wheel separately until they have a combination of words that inspires. Here are two sets of words we came up with: invention, prehistoric, and outpost; miracle, animal kingdom, and farm. Teachers can also add custom words and themes to the app through in-app purchases of "character creator" and "world builder."


Learn More About / Download this App Through a Link on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: Waiting Room Chaos in Pediatric Therapy

by the Anonymous OT

Ah yes, the waiting room: The very bane of my existence.

Parents? Kids? Therapists? Are we all in agreement here? It's just the worst.

 

The concept itself is crazy- Here kids, sit in this chair, be quiet, and wait patiently for your turn. Ha!


It gets loud, it gets busy, and it gets challenging to walk around without knocking someone over. And that's just at 10AM... wait until the afternoon rush hits!


The waiting room has been an issue everywhere I've ever worked- whether the clinic was tiny or huge. However, one clinic had the unique opportunity to move into a bigger facility. There was much debate about arranging the waiting room in the new place. Should there be more space?

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


Pediatric Therapy Corner Too: Reflections on Alaska...Where Life is Bigger Tales of a Seasoned OT Returning to the Frontier State

Editor's Note:  Susan Mullins, OTR/L is a returning contractor for PediaStaff.  This year, she accepted the opportunity of a lifetime to work in Fairbanks, Alaska.  Before she left for her adventure, we asked Susan if she would write an article for us about her early experiences there that we could share here on our blog and newsletter.   Little did she know how profoundly this trip would affect her - and so quickly!   When I first read Susan's essay, I thought it read like an ad for PediaStaff!  I seriously contemplated asking her to rewrite it so our readers wouldn't think we wrote it under her name.  But then I thought,  "No.  This essay is from the heart and I shouldn't
touch it!"   So, here it is, unedited!   Thank you Susan for such a beautiful account of your impressions so far!

by  Susan Mullins, OTR/L

Does the road call your name? A sojourner spirit, nature lover, or adventure seeker describe you? Do solitary moments gazing at the Aurora Borealis (northern lights), hanging glaciers, mountain peaks, and animal sightings grab your attention? 

 

 Read the Rest of Susan's Essay on our Blog

SLP Corner: Childhood Apraxia of Speech - Q&A for Clinicians

Editor's Note:    This article was written for us back in 2009 by Sharon Gretz.  We hope you enjoy this encore publication.  


By: Sharon Gretz, M.Ed.

 

What are the characteristics of Childhood Apraxia of Speech?
Unfortunately there is not complete agreement among researchers. However, currently it is generally held that, regardless of other features, the hallmark of CAS is an inability or disruption in the planning and programming of speech movements. While there is still not complete agreement among researchers, the 2007 ASHA Technical Report on CAS identified 3 features that appear to have the most agreement. These include:

  1. inconsistent errors on consonants and vowels in repeated productions of syllables or words,
  2. lengthened and disrupted coarticulatory transitions between sounds and syllables, and
  3. inappropriate prosody, especially in the realization of lexical or phrasal stress." (ASHA Technical Report on CAS, 2007)
Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Worth Repeating: Top 12 Pearls of Wisdom For SLP Newbies

[Source:  ASHAsphere]

by Jenna Rayburn

 

You've done it! Congratulations! Six years of school, countless clinical hours, and the Praxis. Now that it's time to start your first job as a speech-language pathologist. Your first job will teach you all those things you didn't learn in graduate school. After my first few years, I've reflected on the most important lessons I learned and here are the top twelve:


Also Worth Repeating: Introducing Switches and Augmentative Communication Devices to Very Young Children

[Source:  Complex Child Magazine]

Young children with significant physical impairments may require the use of specialized devices in order to communicate.  While it is extremely important for all young children to communicate, in some ways it is even more important for children with medical issues to be able to indicate their wants and needs.  For these children, early augmentative communication may help them either to develop speech or to transition to a sophisticated communication device as they get older. 

  

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Did You Get This From a Friend?

 

Sign Up For Your Copy of This Newsletter!

Would you like pediatric and school-based therapy tips, resources, articles, and news delivered to your computer once a week? Sign up here for our newsletter!

Sign up HERE
Quick Links to PediaStaff
If you would like to opt out of receiving this newsletter, there is a link located in the footer below. However, please note that once you've opted out, we will be unable to send you any future correspondence via newsletter.
Please Note:  The views and advice expressed in articles, videos and other pieces published in this newsletter are not necessarily the views and advice of PediaStaff or its employees but rather that of the author.  PediaStaff is not endorsing or implying agreement with the views or advice contained therein, rather presenting them for the independent analysis and information of its readers.