October 23, 2018
'NIGHT OF TERROR': THE SUFFRAGISTS WHO WERE BEATEN AND TORTURED FOR SEEKING THE VOTE
Terence McArdle, The Washington Post
The women were clubbed, beaten and tortured by the guards at the Occoquan Workhouse. The 33 suffragists from the National Woman's Party had been arrested  Nov. 10, 1917, while picketing outside the White House for the right to vote.
The suffragists dubbed their treatment Nov. 14, 1917, as the "Night of Terror," and it helped galvanize public support of the suffrage movement.
"There are two ways in which this story might be told. It might be told as a tragic and harrowing tale of martyrdom. Or it might be told as a ruthless enterprise of compelling a hostile administration to subject women to martyrdom in order to hasten its surrender. The truth is, it has elements of both ruthlessness and martyrdom."
She added emphatically: "But it was never martyrdom for its own sake. It was martyrdom used for a practical purpose."
That practical purpose came to pass on Aug. 18, 1920, when the 19th amendment was ratified, giving women the right to vote.  Read more here .
WOMEN CANDIDATES POISED TO MAKE HISTORY IN 2018 MIDTERM ELECTIONS
Grace Segers, CBS news
The 1992 election is often referred to as "The Year of the Woman," as more women were elected to Congress than any year before. This year is set to be another record-breaking year by the same measure, and several women are poised to make history due to their race, religious beliefs or sexual orientation.  A record 53 women ran to be elected to the Senate and 476 women ran for the House of Representatives in 2018. Twenty-two of them won party nominations to the Senate and 235 won party nominations to the House. Those 257 women will be on ballots in midterm elections in November.  However, according to the Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers University, if women win all the races in which they are currently favored, as well as toss-up races, they will comprise only about 24 percent of the House.  
Read more here.
HOW WILL HISTORY JUDGE THE FAILURE OF OUR GOVERNNING PROCESS?
Davis Merritt
The core question that democracy poses to us is, "What shall we do?"
To respond, we need at least four things:
  • Shared information.
  • A place to discuss the implications of that information.
  • A process for acting upon the information.
  • Some shared values; at a minimum a belief in
    democracy itself.
Without those tools, our nation can neither care for itself and its people nor improve their circumstances.
For most of America's history, we have had those tools. Without them, there could have been no revolution against the British crown, no U.S. Constitution, no putting back the pieces after secession and civil war; no victories in World War I and II, and no seventy years of democratizing social order, respite from global wars, and growing prosperity not only here but also in much of the world.  Read more here .
FOR MELISSA ROOKER AND OTHER MODERATE REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES IN KANSAS, THE CENTER CANNOT HOLD
Barbara Shelly, The Pitch
The citizen who answered Melissa Rooker's knock at his door only wanted to know one thing. Which political party was she with?
"I won't vote for any Republican," the man said.
Rooker had heard this on other doorsteps. But something about this encounter set her off.
"You are everything that's wrong with politics today," Rooker told the startled constituent. He wasn't willing to look at issues, she said. He wasn't willing to get to know her as a person, or a public servant. All he saw was labels. 
Rooker was three doors away, still steaming, when the man caught up with her. He apologized. So did she. Later he sent her a campaign check and put one of her signs in his yard.
But that was just one door, and one voter.  As she trudges through the campaign season, Rooker feels besieged. She represents a rarified political species: Kansas Moderate Republican. Read more here .
HAVE WE FORGOTTEN ABOUT FUTURE GENERATIONS?
Letters to the Editor: The Wichita Eagle
Adam Lukens, Wichita
We need to get back to loving our children more than we hate our enemies. We've lost this by elevating tribalism and hatred to be our driving government force. This is totally self-destructive. It didn't used to be like this.
In the final month before mid-term elections, my advice is please listen to what the candidates are saying. Are they focusing more on hatred of perceived enemies rather than love for others? Are they talking about education, children's safety, a health and sustainable environment, a stable international world with enforcement abilities, and a budget structure that doesn't create onerous debt for future generations?
Please read the candidates platforms and attend the town halls and debates. Ask them about these issues - not why they think we should hate each other. Read full editorial here.
KANSAS GOVERNOR'S RACE IS REFERENDUM ON NOTORIOUS TAX CUTS
John Hanna, WNCT 9
A contentious Kansas governor's race has become a referendum on how a Republican experiment in slashing income taxes went awry, what lessons arose from the budget misery that followed and whether the state needs a do-over.
The argument over taxes is likely to dominate the campaign's final weeks; it is playing out in television ads and was a persistent theme Tuesday. Tax cuts appeal to voters in a GOP-leaning state like Kansas, but the fiscal problems that followed Brownback's tax experiment made Kansas a memorable cautionary tale across the U.S.  Read more here .

KANSAS TAX CUTS AND REVISITING HISTORY
Julie Doll, Hutchinson News
Time for a history lesson, one that can be condensed into four headlines I found while doing online research:
From the  Lawrence Journal-World in December 2014: Brownback announces $280 million in allotment cuts to fill budget shortfall. 
From NPR  in February 2015: Kansas will cut education funding to help close budget gap.  From the Wichita Eagle in November 2016: State facing $350 million budget gap.  From the Topeka Capital-Journal in March 2017: Kansas, facing huge budget deficits, wonders what to do next.
Read more here.

GUNS, ABORTION, SCHOOLS, TAXES, HEALTH: WHAT KANSAS GOVERNOR CANDIDATES THINK
Jonathan Shorman, Kansas.com
The election for Kansas governor is less than a month away.
Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach is facing Democratic Sen. Laura Kelly in what appears to be a close race.
Ahead of the Nov. 6 election, The Eagle is summarizing where the candidates stand on five significant issues in the race, based on candidate interviews, public statements and their websites.  Read more here .

MEDICAID EXPANSION BECOMES KEY ISSUE IN GOP-LEANING STATES
Grant Schulte and Geoff Mulvihill, The Kansas City Star
About 12 million Americans have gained coverage under the expansion in the 33 states that opted for it under the Obama health care reforms. The program extends Medicaid to cover more low-income adults, including those with no children at home, and the federal government picks up most of the cost.
A government report released this past week found that lower-income people in states that did not broaden access to Medicaid were much more likely to skip needed medical care than people in states that did.  Read more   here .
CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENTS THAT HELP INFORM:

CAPITAL-JOURNAL ELECTION GUIDE: MEET THE CANDIDATES RUNNING FOR KANSAS GOVERNOR
Meet Jeff Caldwell Laura Kelly Rick Kloos,
Kris Kobach, and  Greg Orman.
Meet more candidates at the Topeka Capital-Journal site here .

WICHITA EAGLE VOTER GUIDE
The Wichita Eagle Voter's Guide link is available with information on all candidates, and you have the option to enter your address and preview your sample ballot  here.

KANSAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BOARDS
A link to the Kansas Association of School Boards site offers an Excel Spreadsheet listing all candidates and the endorsements they have received. Visit the site  here.

GAME ON FOR KANSAS SCHOOLS
I've included a link to the rosters prepared by Game On for Kansas Schools, a nonpartisan group. 
Central & West Edition here. East edition here.
HOW TO MAKE AN INFORMED DECISION WHEN VOTING FOR JUDGES IN MISSOURI AND KANSAS
Dan Margolies, KCUR 89.3
When voters head to the polls on Nov. 6, they'll encounter a slew of down-ballot names they've likely never heard of: judges standing for retention. In Kansas, 101 judges are on the ballot statewide; in Missouri, 58.
Are these retention votes really important?
"Vitally important," according to Larry Tucker, senior counsel at the Armstrong Teasdale law firm and a former president of the Missouri Bar.
Since most voters have little interaction with the courts, how can they be expected to cast an informed vote?
Read more here.
BILLIONAIRES V TEACHERS: THE KOCH BROTHERS' PLAN TO STARVE PUBLIC EDUCATION
Steven Greenhouse, The Guardian
A small group of women have succeeded in putting a state law promoted by Betsy DeVos and billionaire donors which they see as an attack on public education on the ballot in November .
 "The Koch brothers and DeVos are trying to do everything they can to divert money that should go to the public-school system, where 90%-plus of students go," said Joe Thomas, president of the Arizona Education Association. Last April, tens of thousands of Arizona teachers went on strike for six days to demand higher pay and school funding. Ducey promised them a 20% raise by 2020, but convinced that he did not put enough money into the budget to finance those raises, the teachers' union got a second referendum on the ballot that would increase income taxes on richer households  to raise over $600m a year for education.
"We set out to do something that everybody said is impossible," Lewis said. "The women on our team are very tenacious."  Read more here .
AS AN AMERICAN DUTY, VOTING SHOULD BE A PROTECTED RIGHT
Madeline Spurlock, The Sunflower.com
For 231 years, the United States Constitution and its amendments have reigned as law of the land - explicitly granting Americans rights and privileges that are to be protected by and from the government.  Americans can't seem to agree on whether voting is a right or a privilege - and it's important to note that the two are not interchangeable. The distinction between right and privilege plays a key role in voter suppression in the United States.
When voting is treated as a privilege, more and more potential voters become disenfranchised. If citizens don't get registered in time, can't afford an ID, or aren't able to miss work or drive to the polls, constituents don't have the ability to hold leaders responsible for actions that affect everyone.  Without this steady system of accountability, the entire concept of American democracy will crumble beneath us.  Read here .
MEET THE KANSAS WOMAN WHO EXPOSED SECURITY FLAWS IN KRIS KOBACH'S VOTER FRAUD TOOL
Peggy Lowe, KCUR.org
Come in and sit down at Anita Parsa's kitchen table. Help yourself to the chocolate chip cookies and she'll get you an iced tea. Might as well make yourself comfortable.
Because for the next hour, she's going to school you on a massive voter-tracking program run by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.  
"I like to figure out puzzles," Parsa says. "I like to crack things, and that's what this is all about."
This particular puzzle was Kobach's Interstate Crosscheck system, which holds voter registration data for 25 states. A list of more than 85 million voters, it purports to catch election fraud by weeding out double voting.
"I'll run this down until it's done and then there will be something else. I don't know what it will be," she said. "My nature is: I'm a dog with a bone."  Read more here .
VOTER TURNOUT COULD HIT
50-YEAR RECORD FOR MIDTERM ELECTIONS
Domenico Montanaro, NPR
The 2018 elections could see the
highest turnout for a midterm since the mid-1960s, another time of cultural and social upheaval.
"It's probably going to be a turnout rate that most people have never experienced in their lives for a midterm election," Michael McDonald, a professor at the University of Florida who studies turnout and maintains a turnout database, told NPR.
McDonald is predicting that 45 to 50 percent of eligible voters will cast a ballot. That would be a level not seen since 1970 when 47 percent of voters turned out or 1966 when a record 49 percent turned out in a midterm.
Read more here.
THOUSANDS AT RISK FROM RIGHTWING PUSH TO PURGE ELIGIBLE VOTERS FROM US ROLLS
Ed Pilkington, The Guardian
In June last year, Luis, a resident of Virginia, was astonished to discover that his name and personal details, including home address, had been posted on the internet by a group known as the Public Interest Legal Foundation (Pilf).
Luis's data had been released by the group, along with hundreds of other names, as an appendix to Pilf's two-part report called "Alien Invasion". 
In lurid language, Pilf claimed that it had uncovered proof that "large numbers of ineligible aliens are registering to vote and casting ballots". It warned its readers: "Your vote is at risk. New alien voters are being added to the rolls month after month, and swift changes must be made to ensure that only Americans are choosing American leaders."
The only problem was that Luis, in common with dozens of other Virginians on the list posted by Pilf, was not in fact an "alien". He was born in Los Angeles and has always enjoyed US citizenship, with full rights to vote since the age of 18.
Read more here .
150 YEARS OF THE 14TH
AMENDMENT
Kaye McIntyre, KPR
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the 14th Amendment, often called the "single most important amendment to the U.S. Constitution." Find out why at this year's Constitution Day at the Dole Institute of Politics, with Chief Judge Julie Robinson and Senior Judge John Lungstrum of the U.S. District Court, moderated by U.S. Attorney Steve McAllister.  Listen here .
FREE SHOWING: DARK MONEY ON PBS
#DarkMoneyFilmPBS

A century ago, corrupt money swamped Montana's government, but Montanans rose up to prohibit corporate campaign contributions. Today, in the wake of the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, Montana is once again fighting to preserve open and honest elections. Following an investigative reporter through a political thriller, Dark Money exposes one of the greatest threats to American democracy.
Watch Dark Money for free during month of October!
To watch it for free online, visit PBS here.
MY FELLOW KANSANS LIVE
Jim McLean, kbja.org
My Fellow Kansans  is coming to Johnson County Library on Thurs., October 25 for a live event, featuring podcast host Jim McLean and political scientist Beth Vonnahme. We'll discuss the current state of Kansas politics and learn how Kansas voters are feeling ahead of the upcoming midterm elections. You'll have a chance to ask questions and hear more about the making of our podcast, too. 
Join us for this special live event on Oct. 25 at 6:30 p.m. at the Johnson County Library Central Branch in Overland Park, Kansas. Learn more and RSVP here.
ONLY ONE CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR RESPONDED TO AOK'S QUESTIONS ABOUT WILDLIFE AND PRAIRIE CONSERVATION
Audobon of Kansas
Prior to the primary, letters with a questionnaire regarding important wildlife conservation questions were sent to all Kansas gubernatorial candidates. It was sent to Democrat Laura Kelly, Republican Kris Kobach, Independent Greg Orman, and all of the other registered candidates.
Laura Kelly was the only candidate who responded. She responded in the affirmative (Yes) to all five questions. Shortly before the primary election, we sent a reminder to other candidates, but still none responded. The questions and Laura Kelly's answers available   here .
KS GOVERNOR'S RACE COULD MAKE OR BREAK KANCARE EXPANSION
Nomin Ujiyediin, KPR
The race for governor of Kansas will likely decide whether the state finally expands its Medicaid program, known as KanCare -- or steers it in another direction entirely.   Opponents argue expansion would cost too much money. Supporters say it would provide health insurance for 150 thousand Kansans.  Listen here .
GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES LAURA KELLY AND GREG ORMAN AT W4K CONVENTION
Gubernatorial candidates, (D) Laura Kelly and (I) Greg Orman field questions from Dena Sattler, Garden City Telegram, and Tom Shine, KS Press Service.
Jeff Jarman, Director of the WSU Elliott School of Communications,  moderated.
  1. Introduction and opening statements. Watch here.
  2. Tax policy and KS budget.
    Watch here.
  3. Immigration, growing rural KS communities, industrial hemp. Watch here.
  4. Medicaid expansion, health care, sales tax on food, and how each candidate will reach across the aisle to solve problems in state. Watch here.
  5. Looking beyond 'red or blue', Department of Children & Families (DCF), and transparency in government. Watch here.
  6. Medical marijuana and possible legalization, sentencing guidelines, gun ownership, control, and campus carry. Watch here. 

NOTE: We apologize that during some segments microphone/audio for Director Jarman not functioning properly.

SECRETARY OF STATE CANDIDATE BRIAN MCCLENDON
Secretary of State candidate, Democrat Brian McClendon field questions from Dena Sattler, Garden City Telegram, and Tom Shine, KS Press Service. Jeff Jarman, Director of the WSU Elliott School of Communications,  moderated. Watch candidate McClendon here.
2018 W4K SHOWING OUR STRENGTH CONVENTION
Our 2018 convention,  March to the Orpheum, and a screening of  The Best Democracy Money Can Buy.  Watch the march to the Orpheum  here .

PART 1: STATE OF THE STATE
Micah Kubic: Challenges,  Voting Rights
Susan DeVaughn: Education funding and the Supreme Court

PART 2: LEGISLATIVE PROCESS
Davis Hammet: The Divide Between People, Politicians And Policy
Steve Lopes: Smart ALEC
Annie McKay & John Wilson: State Budget and Children & Family Issues

PART 3: HEROES LUNCHEON
Mary Knecht: Introduction of Heroes and Ann Zimmerman
Kaye Monk-Morgan: Raising Black Sons in America
Sarah Bagby: Introduction of  Sarah Smarsh -  Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth

PART 4: IMMIGRATION
Claudia Amaro:  My Story
Sandrine Lisk:  An Unfolding Crisis
Judy Sherry:  Advocating against Gun Violence-and Why We Must

PART 5: NEWS WE CAN USE
Maci Johnson:  Introduction of Speakers
Jason Probst:  Demise of the KS Press
Jeff Jarman:  Fake News
Tom Shine:  Kansas News Sources

PART 6: CONVENTION BANQUET AND CANDIDATE FORUM
Hostesses Jill Docking & Dana Hensley:
A poem by Gina Austin-Fresh followed by introduction of Dena Sattler & Tom Shine, candidates, and moderator Jeff Jarman

For the complete playlist of all convention videos, visit our YouTube channel here .
CIBOSKI: VOTER SUPPRESSION
Ken Ciboski, KMUW 89.1
The 15th amendment to the Constitution states: The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
Issues regarding voter ID laws are erupting around the country. 
In a recent book called  One Person, No Vote, author Carol Anderson asserts that Kobach's purge was not driven by any crisis or urgent need, and no threat to the ballot box existed. Instead, she argues this was about Kobach's desire to remove the poor and minorities from the voter rolls. This amounted to voter suppression that would likely favor Republican candidates.  Listen here .

Rock the Vote is a nonpartisan, nonprofit dedicated to  building the 
political power  of young people.

With your support, W4K will again help lead the way.

Our work, supported 100% 
by individual, private donations,
now gives you 2 options:

Women for Kansas Civic Group
A 501(c)(4) nonprofit, the Civic Group
is our primary and membership organization, providing support for our staff and advocacy activities. It is the most flexible funding source and the best choice for donors.
Donations are not tax deductible
but are the most flexible way to support our advocacy work.

Women for Kansas
A 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, W4K engages in non-partisan, non-political educational activities on behalf of our shared values. Donations to Women for Kansas are tax deductible.

Basic support $75.00 year
Contributing support $150.00 year
Sustaining support $500.00 year
Student support $30.00 year

Mail your check to:
Women for Kansas Civic Group
( or) Women for Kansas
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Wichita, Kansas 67208

Pay online with PayPal:
W4K Civic Group, click here.
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(You are not required to have a PayPal account).
INTRODUCING VOTE411 BAR CODES
Use these handy QR codes to register to vote, make a pinky promise pledge to vote, and then prepare to vote via Vote411.orgSHARE WIDELY!
KRC 2018 CONFERENCE

The Kansas Rural Center's annual Farm & Food Conference  November 16-17 , 2018 will feature 12 educational workshops each day providing practical information for diversifying and managing farm or ranch enterprises,  support for beginning and the next generation of farmers, building a new food and farm economy, and communicating for stronger on-farm, community, andpublic policy decisions. The conference will be held at the Hotel at Old Town Conference Center in Wichita. 2018 Conference Agenda
information here . Register here .
  HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY FORUM | GREAT BEND
October 23, 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Kansas Wetlands Education Center 
592 North East K-156 Highway
 
HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY FORUM | PRAIRIE VILLAGE
October 25, 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Congregation Ohev Sholom 
5311 West 75th Street
 
HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY FORUM | WICHITA
October 30, 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Advanced Learning Library Room B 
711 West 2nd Street

Watch for more Community Forums at the Expand KanCare site here .
CANDID CONVERSATIONS
ON RACE
MONDAY, OCT. 29,  6-7:30PM
Wichita Public Library
8515 W Bekemeyer St, Wichita

A panel of local criminal justice leaders representing law enforcement, the courts, and corrections will discuss possible contributing factors as to why these racial disparities exist and what can be done about them.
Dr. Michael Birzer, a criminal justice professor at Wichita State University, will moderate the panel.  Interested in going? Vis it the Facebook page here.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3,
12:00 - 4:00 PM
The International Rescue Committee in Wichita
1530 S Oliver, Suite 270, Wichita

We've asked a number of musicians, artists, and businesses to collaborate with us in making this event happen,  and we're asking you to come out,  meet us, and engage with us as we build a community around exactly what the theme of this Benefit Concert is about- "Coming Together" to support one another and the individuals and families we work with.  More info available  here .
Follow Women for Kansas on Twitter  or Instagram,
@women_for_kansas. Like us on Facebook , and visit our website at www.WomenforKansas.org .
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