Windows Weekly January 28, 2021
ALBANY UU WINDOWS WEEKLY
Greetings Friends,

Welcome to Windows Weekly, Albany UU's central source for news and updates. Please stay safe and stay connected to your Albany UU Community during this uncertain time in the many ways provided online - all described below.

Please note, you may see announcements in this publication more than once. That is with intent and to ensure that items don't get missed as folks scroll through. Thank you for your understanding.

If this email was forwarded to you, and you would like to receive it directly, please sign up here.

Learn more about what's happening with UU Kids and Families by reading the Religious Education publication, RE Roundup.

-Blessings and Be Well
MISSION STATEMENT
We welcome everyone. Our Unitarian Universalist community seeks truth and deeper meaning, pursues justice through inspired action, and cultivates compassion and love for all connected by the web of life.

VISION STATEMENT
Albany UU will be an inclusive, welcoming congregation. Our sacred work is to lift hearts, broaden minds and do justice in the world, in service of building beloved community.

CONGREGATIONAL COVENANT
As a congregation with respect for our past and commitment to the future, we draw from the depth and power of our hearts and minds, guided by our Unitarian Universalist principles, to serve our mission and vision. We celebrate the diversity of our identities and experiences, and foster a culture of appreciation, inspiration, and kindness. We honor both the strength of the collective and uniqueness of the individual, willing to support and challenge each other with love and compassion. We entrust ourselves to each other in beloved community, to embolden personal and congregational growth and transformation.
VIRTUAL SUNDAY SERVICE
10:00 am
LIVE VIA ZOOM


Jan 31, "Is You Got Good Religion?" David Weissbard

Several years ago, I participated in the founding meeting of the Progressive Religious Partnership. I was impressed by the sermon delivered by one of the organizers, Dr. James G. Adams. He raised the question of the negative impact religion has often had. As Liberals, we are not supposed to judge other religions, but I am sympathetic to those who believe that religion has often been [and in many cases still is] a blight on humankind. But not always. I do believe Unitarian Universalism can make a positive contribution to the lives of some [maybe not all] of us. I am building on Dr. Adams subject and title: "Is You Got Good Religion?"

Music provided by Elena Karpoff, Chris Jensen and Randy Rosette

Focus Food Pantry
Please consider a contribution to the Focus Food Pantry this Sunday. Online donations can be made here or directly to Focus Churches, here. or you may send your check to the church with FOCUS on the memo line. Thank you for your help.

Use this link to join the service:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000



Join us for Family Chapel for Children and Families at 11:30 AM
We have one more session on our theme of Imagination with the book Fairey Houses. The Preschool – 1st grade, 2nd-5th grade, Crossing Paths (6th and 7th grade) and 8th grade Book Group will meet after Family Chapel.

Use this link to join:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866
Meeting ID 843 1034 5197
Password: 4051842
VIRTUAL SUNDAY SERVICES

Albany UU Virtual Services - Live via Zoom
Main Service at 10:00 AM, Children's Service at 11:30 AM

Begin your Sunday morning with Rev. Sam guiding an 8:30 Virtual Meditation session until 9:15 (see below under Upcoming Ways to Connect for more info). We then have Virtual Service beginning at 10:00 each Sunday and a chance to stay online for virtual "Coffee Hour" followed by RE for ALL, at 11:30.

Use this link to join Sunday service:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000


Feb 7, “The Evolution of Community,” Rev. Sam Trumbore

Human beings cannot survive without community. Some social networks are essential to help us thrive and grow. Yet other forms are harmful and destructive. Social evolutionary theory has a lot to teach us about how to create healthy communities. Dr. David Sloan Wilson will be our guide.

Music provided by Elena Karpoff, Randy Rosette, Chris Jensen


Feb 14, Celebration the Culmination of the 30 Days of Love

Join us as we celebrate hopeful, moving, challenging reminders about what we, as Unitarian Universalists, are called to do, and BE, in the world.

Music TBD


Feb 21, “Beloved Community in Practice,” Rev. Sam Trumbore

The ideals of community make it sound delightful. Yet individuals imperfectly fit themselves into communities and can be in tension with it. How do we resolve the never-ending conflicts between individual interests and the good of the community?

Music provided by our Albany UU Virtual Choir, Elena Karpoff, Randy Rosette


Feb 28, “The Price of Community,” Rev. Sam Trumbore
Every community makes claims upon its members. It may ask for shared values and commitments. It may ask for shared behavioral norms. All communities ask for loyalty in some form. And all of them depend on mutual financial support.

Music provided by our Albany UU Virtual Choir, Elena Karpoff, Chris Jensen, Randy Rosette, Parody by Bob Franklin


Sunday Service Information

Sunday services will be online via Zoom at 10:00 AM EST. There will be no service, religious education or other activities in the church building until further notice. Not familiar with Zoom? Our minister, Rev. Sam Trumbore will give you a brief tutorial.

Use this link to join the Sunday service:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000

Joys and Concerns for Online Services
We have three ways that you can share your joys and concerns.
  • One: Use the online form. If you use this form, you can indicate if you would like to have your joys and concerns shared at the Sunday service, and you can leave contact info if you would like a Pastoral Care Associate to follow up with you.
  • Two: Email your joy or sorrow to joysandsorrows@albanyuu.org before Sunday morning to have them read aloud during the service
  • Three: We will be giving you instructions during the Sunday service about how to share your joys and concerns then.


Adult RE for ALL, Sunday Offering and other Information

For more information about Sunday service, Zoom, Adult RE for ALL, Sunday Offering, and other important Sunday morning details, check out our Sunday at a Glance page here.
UPCOMING WAYS to CONNECT

Board of Trustees Meeting
Tonight, Thursday, Jan 28 at 6:30 PM the Board of Trustees holds their monthly meeting. Board meetings are open to all Albany UU members.

Use this link to join:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000


Start your Sunday Morning with Meditation - 8:30 - 9:15 AM
Sunday morning meditation, led by Rev. Sam, begins with a ten-minute talk by Sharon Salzberg or Joseph Goldstein from their course on Insight Meditation. We will sit together for twenty minutes then have some conversation about the talk, meditation methods or experiences followed by a live loving kindness meditation. 

Use this link to join:

By phone: 1-929-436-2866
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000


RE for Children and Youth on Sundays at 11:30 AM
We’ll have our 15-minute worship for children, youth, and their parents/caretakers and guides. Then we’ll have breakout groups for: preschool-first grade; 2nd-5th grade; 6th/7th grade and 8th grade.

Use this link to join:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866
Meeting ID 843 1034 5197
Password: 4051842


Adult RE 11:30 AM on Sundays
Conversational Response: This is your opportunity to reflect with the Sunday service presenter, this Sunday, Rev Sam, on what the service has elicited from you and listen to the responses of others. Learn more here.

Use the Service Link to join:
 
To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000


Philosophy Group
At 10:15 AM every Tuesday, the Albany UU Philosophy Group will meet via zoom and discuss their topic of the day.
All are welcome.

Use this link to join:

By phone: 1-929-436-2866 
Meeting ID: 987 7102 4708
Password: 0000


Free Concerts
Every Thursday morning at 10:45, Alyssa Yeager will be offering free live concerts on facebook.com/alyssayeagermusic and
youtube.com/rhiannonslark. Alyssa performs a mix of her originals and your favorite 50s-60s folk rock, including requests. All are welcome!


Albany UU Sings
Join your friends and sing your heart out in Virtual Community! We will supply the music and the lyrics.
Save these Wednesday dates at 7:00 PM for the rest of the the service year:
February 3, 17; March 3, 24; April 7, 21; May 12, 26; June 9
Hope to see you there.

Use this link to join:

By phone: 1-929-436-2866
Meeting ID: 979 5961 1765
Passcode: 0000
Multigenerational Game Night
Friday, Feb 5, 6:30 PM
Join us for some time together for fun and games on Zoom. We’ll start with some “getting to know you” activities and then have two or three breakout rooms with different games. Email Mike Myers at myersesq@aol.com with questions and to let him know by Feb 1 if you’re coming. Learn more here.

Use this link to join:


A Virtual Orientation for Newcomers on Zoom
Getting to Know UU
Saturday, Feb 6, is a great chance for some of us at Albany UU to get to know YOU -- but it's also a perfect opportunity for you to learn about this Unitarian Universalist congregation, explore the roots of "UUism," and begin to figure out how participating in congregational life can enhance your personal journey.

Please join us:
9:00 AM to noon
Saturday, Feb 5

Use this link to join:

To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000

Signing up is preferred, but logins the day of are welcome, come as you are!
To sign up: Send an email to Registration@AlbanyUU.org.


Ps and Qs
Projects and Quilts (Ps and Qs) will zoom next on Wednesday, Feb 10 at 10:00 AM.

Use this link to join:

By phone: 929-436-2866
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000


Walker Book Group
Join the Walker Book Group for a Zoom discussion on Sunday, Feb 14 at 6:30 pm. We will discuss Caste: The Origin of our Discontents by Isabel WilkersonLearn more here.

Use this link to join:
 
To dial in by phone: 1-929-436-2866:
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000


Wine and Cheese Tasting Fundraiser!
Fasten your virtual seatbelts and practice your 'Stralian accents, as your UU Wineaux group flies you on a ZOOM tour of Australian and New Zealand Wines.

Our 16th Annual Wine and Cheese tasting will take place Saturday, 27 February at 7:00 PM on ZOOM. That afternoon, you will pick up (and if you're unable to drive, we will deliver) the selected servings of wines paired with cheeses and appropriate crackers, fruits and condiments. That evening, will we all join together for guided tastings and commentary. Save the date and mark your calendars now - a sign up form will be available very soon! In the meantime check out the flyer here and below!


Special Congregational Meeting on Proposed Bylaws
Sunday, Feb 28 following service. Learn more here.

Stay on the service link to join:
 
By phone: 929-436-2866
Meeting ID: 299 018 7785
Password: 0000
MEDITATION WORKSHOP

Mindfulness Meditation Workshop on Zoom
led by Rev. Sam Trumbore
February 12 & 13

This meditation training and practice workshop will be led by Rev. Trumbore, on Friday 6:00pm to 9:00pm, and Saturday 8:00am to 3:00pm. It gives the participants an opportunity to learn Buddhist mindfulness meditation techniques and/or refresh and deepen their meditation practice. All are welcome from first timers to experts. People will sit together as we do on Zoom on Sunday mornings and do walking meditation in their own homes. We’ll have a break for lunch on Saturday at noon. Please register with Rev. Sam by email (minister@albanyuu.org) if you would like to participate. A voluntary donation can be offered at the end to the Minister’s Discretionary Fund. This is an experiment to see if a Zoom retreat will work or not.

Rev. Trumbore has practiced Buddhist Vipassana or insight meditation for over 35 years and is Past President of the Unitarian Universalist Buddhist Fellowship. This meditation technique is one of the best for Unitarian Universalists. It helps people train their minds to strengthen concentration and intensify moment-to-moment awareness. Regular practice of this technique quiets and sharpens the mind, opens the heart and improves one's physical and mental health.
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS!

Focus Food Pantry
Please consider a contribution to the Focus Food Pantry this Sunday. Online donations can be made here or directly to Focus Churches, here. or you may send your check to the church with FOCUS on the memo line. Thank you for your help.


UU Family/Household Circle Training
Friday, Feb 12, 8-9 pm and Saturday, Feb 13, 10-11am

Min of 5 families/households needed to run this training.
This training is available to the whole congregation!
Leah Purcell has a tool she can share with families, couples, or any household to strengthen connections and communication at home. It’s a way to help practice your values where it counts most – at home, with the people you spend so much time with! The whole family or household does not need to come to learn – just two members is enough for to learn and bring the practice home. This two-part workshop is for adults, youth, and children. Parents/caretakers can put young ones to bed on Friday before attending; Saturday session will have some activities to include little ones - hopefully, they can also play nearby for this hour.
Fill out this form if you’re interested. If you have questions, contact Leah at dre@albanyuu.org


Volunteer Opportunity
The Albany City Schools are not allowing volunteers to work with students during this tumultuous school year. However, the Reading Is Fun (RIF) program, targeted to elementary students in the Schenectady City Schools who need extra help building reading skills, is looking for volunteers to work virtually with students,

The goal of RIF is to ensure that every 4-year-old to 9-year-old learns the letters in the alphabet and their sounds and have fun doing it! Conversational skills are used to help youngsters develop vocabulary to help build the basis for success in school and throughout life. 

Volunteers read books to or with students depending on the students’ reading level. Games are often used to help with letter recognition and sight words. Books are provided to volunteers and are given to the students to build a home library.
 
Sessions occur once a week at convenient times for the volunteer and teacher for 30 to 60 minutes.     
 
No teaching experience is necessary to volunteer. Volunteers are trained in one-hour sessions conducted by literacy educators and reading teachers. The program also offers training in Google Meet, the computer program used to work with students.
 
If you are interested in learning more about volunteering, please contact Valarie Rivera at rifvolunteerplacements@gmail.com


Plan Ahead for Virtual GA
General Assembly is the annual gathering of Unitarian Universalists. In 2021, GA will again be all-virtual, held June 23-27.  Consider participating in this inspiring, educational, challenging and joyful gathering! Mark your calendar now and check www.uua.org/ga for more information.

“Circle 'Round for Justice, Healing, Courage” is the theme for GA 2021. Interested individuals are invited to submit a Program Proposal. Proposals are due in two phases. Phase 1: Due January 15. Phase 2: Due January 29.
 
You can register for GA and also find out how to volunteer on the UUA website.
SAM'S OUTLOOK

Community Forged in Solidarity

Social insect species do not like diversity. If an ant from one nest wanders into another ant colony’s nest by mistake it will be immediately killed. The same with stray honeybees landing in the wrong hive. The same with a termite from another mound. If they are genetically dissimilar, they will be immediately sensed as a mortal threat. These extremely successful social species who have finely tuned systems of cooperation become homicidal maniacs if aliens come anywhere near them. They have zero tolerance for difference.

Humans haven’t escaped this kind of genetic reactivity. For most of our evolutionary history, we’ve lived in small tribal bands of genetically related individuals. The way unrelated members entered these tribes was through conflict, capture and enslavement – not friendly immigration policies. We’d probably still be in hunter gatherer bands today if it were not for agriculture and religion.

I’d like to highlight how Judaism and Christianity innovated on the problem of getting people to cooperate in larger groups than tribes. The twelve tribes of Israel were under pressure to unite as other competing civilizations grew in size and power. They knew from their enslavement in Egypt how a powerful empire had organized under Pharaohs to create great military power. They were lucky to escape with their lives with a little help parting the Red Sea then drowning the Egyptian chariots following them.

The Jewish innovations that created the cohesion to hold diverse tribes together was their covenant with God. Their Covenant gave the Jewish tribes favor with God if they followed God’s directions. The very first covenant was marking male bodies with circumcision, a marking that couldn’t be faked or reversed. Males from different genetic lines could be accurately identified as part of the same group. This was a powerful way to establish group membership seen in other parts of the world too.

The second innovation was to identify detailed laws of behavior, the laws of Moses, that identified group allegiance. Daily, Jews signaled their group membership by what they wore, covering the head for example, what they ate and didn’t eat (unleavened bread and kosher foods, and not eating pork and shellfish), and through ritual daily prayers and behaviors. This reinforced group membership and made it clear to others who belonged and didn’t belong. The purpose was to prevent Jews from blending in and being assimilated into the culture around them. These strategies have worked and worked well for thousands of years to preserve Jewish identity.

Jesus advocated another innovation of Judaism that gave birth to Christianity. The one thing we are most certain that Jesus taught is the coming realm of God, God’s paradeosos, or paradise, the restoration of Eden on earth for Israel. It echoes a text Jesus likely knew, Isaiah 51:3:

For the LORD will comfort Zion; he will comfort all her waste places, and will make her wilderness like Eden, her desert like the paradeosos of the LORD, joy and gladness will be found in her, thanksgiving and the voice of song.

This wasn’t just for observant Jews however. Jesus gathered in the unclean and ritually impure. Jesus gathered in the poor who had no access to the Temple. Jesus suggested Gentiles could be included too. St. Paul took it a little further when he said Christians didn’t need to be circumcised to be a follower of Jesus. They didn’t need to follow Jewish dietary law. Jesus was clear that what made you part of his movement wasn’t outer signs and behaviors. It was an inner transformation, a change of heart that mattered. Just following the Jewish law wasn’t enough to sanctify them. They needed to do follow the law with good intentions and a pure heart.

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ministered as a Christian but recognized that the Realm of God’s appeal was too Christian centric to build a movement on to defeat racism. Racism had its roots in the us vs. them social dynamic that has separated us since the beginning of time. Racism took reinforcement from the same scriptures on which Christianity was based. How could Jesus’ message of love be universalized?

One powerful answer came from the Philosopher Josiah Royce. Royce was critical of individualists like Whitman, Emerson, William James and especially Nietzsche. Royce thought the individual was nothing without being part of a community. “My life means nothing, either theoretically or practically, unless I am a member of a community.” (1913) Royce postulated the ideal of “Beloved Community.” He connected that vision but extended it beyond the church as the process of loyal interpretation of their guiding spirit.

King recognized the centrality of community in Royce’s concept of Beloved Community that extended beyond Christianity and could be a foundation to bind together a movement that transcended himself. What could bind loyalty to that movement were core principles like non-violent progressive action; acceptance of difference; and a commitment to liberation from systemic racism, injustice and suffering for all people.

Unitarian Universalism today finds deep resonance with Royce’s and Dr. King’s vision of Beloved Community. This month we will dig into it and begin to appreciate its potential as a unifying power to define us, to bring us together, and to energize our work for inner and outer transformation.
                                                                                               -Rev. Sam


More from our blogs:
INCLUSIVITY RECOMMENDS

Join the Living Legacy Project for free, virtual programs to meet the people and the music of the American Civil Rights Movement. Two online series between January and May will take an in-depth look at the stories and music that power movements for change.
 
Pivotal Events of the Civil Rights Movement
A Virtual Living Legacy Pilgrimage
"Fourth Sunday of the month will begin with a focus on the inspiring music of the Movement and then will take you on a journey through time from draconian Jim Crow laws to Freedom Rides, Freedom Summer, and the Selma to Montgomery March for Voting Rights."

​​Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round
The Music of Civil Rights and Social Change
​"Our music series, offered on the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 7:00 pm Eastern from February through May, will present music that reaches back in time to the 1950s and 60s and music that is as new as a CD being released in 2021." 



White Fragility Book Discussion Group with Gemma Halfi
The Inclusivity Team has arranged for Gemma Halfi, Assistant Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, at Emma Willard School, to once again facilitate a group discussion of the book White Fragility, by Robin DiAngelo. The discussions will take place on Zoom during four sessions in February and March. Space is limited. Please sign up only if you can come to all four sessions. A limited number of books are available through Albany UU. For all of the details and instructions on how to sign up, click here.


Our Inclusivity Team is offering resources for our ongoing education and reflection to address white supremacy culture at Albany UU. Are you finding that you have some time for reading and watching videos these days? Consider settling in with these titles by authors of color to help you become familiar with a diversity of human experiences.

For adults and youth (with guidance, as necessary):
Heads of the Colored People: Stories, by Nafissa Thompson-Spires (2018). Each short story is a stand-alone gem, and one finds, with delight, that the characters are connected in this woven literary tapestry. Available in hardcopy, downloadable e-book, and downloadable audiobook in the Upper Hudson Library System (UHLS).  

For children and others:
Outside, Inside, by LeUyen Pham (2021). Why can't we play Monopoly together? Why can't we have birthday cake together? Why do we have to spend so much time inside? Why can't we go on vacation? In this beautifully illustrated story book, Pham makes our current lives into the simplest of stories. Available to borrow in hard copy at the UHLS, or for purchase at The Book House and Market Block Books. Not available in audiobook at this time.
SOCIAL ACTION
Social Responsibilities Council Recommends

Food Drive Contribution Opportunity
Our near neighbors, Grassroots Givers, has asked if Albany UUs would be interested in contributing again to their food drive. They are looking for partners to stock their ONEWORLD Relief micro food pantry in front of their facility at 522 Washington Avenue. During the Pandemic, there has been a huge demand for food placed there and they’re having trouble keeping it stocked. They are looking for non-perishable food items (canned goods, pasta, etc.) that can be placed in the micro-pantry in front of the facility. You could make an appointment to leave bags of non-perishables on the cart outside of their door, or the food can be put directly into the pantry when dropped off.  


Raise Your Voice for End of Life Choice
CALL TO ACTION: Be a virtual volunteer to change the world from the comfort of your home.

Many UUs are strong advocates for passing New York’s Medical Aid in Dying Act. The Act would:
  • empower terminally ill New Yorkers to obtain medication that they could take to avoid needless suffering and have a peaceful death; and
  • give New Yorkers the same end-of-life options available in DC and nine states, including our neighbors, Vermont and New Jersey.
To learn more, view this website and this webinar.
 
Governor Cuomo has said that he would sign the bill into law once it is passed by the Assembly and Senate. Many lawmakers returning in 2021 are already supporters, as the Act was gaining momentum in 2020 before the pandemic. But, in 2021, more than 40 newly elected lawmakers will need to meet with advocates to learn about the Act and the importance of passing it this year. 

That’s where you can help. We need a groundswell of New Yorkers to reach out to lawmakers.
  • Volunteer to be a virtual advocate to meet with lawmakers via Zoom in order to share your story and reasons for supporting medical aid in dying. You will be joined by experienced advocates so you don’t need to know all the details of the Act or have advocacy experience. Just your presence can make a difference. Offer to help by sending an email to Amanda Cavanaugh at NY@compassionandchoices.org.
  • Contact your Assembly Member and Senator to express your support for medical aid in dying. Even if you have contacted them before, do it again. Use this link for email, or call them.
  • Learn more about the 2021 campaign and how to advance the Act by viewing this webinar.
  • Reach out to family, friends, neighbors, colleagues and others to invite them to join you in all of the actions listed above. 


Thoughts from Leah on how to support BLM
In case it's helpful, here's an article I found on How to Support the Black Lives Matter Movement, Even if You Don't Have Money It's written by a white woman from Allure which is a women's beauty magazine. I'm not much into women's beauty trends these days, but I do appreciate the article. You may see that you have already done or are currently working on one or more of the actions from the article, or maybe you've considered one of the actions. Yay! One thing it mentions is following Black activists in your area. I've started learning about Amy Jones. From the article in the hyperlink "Jones says she focuses her efforts on people who are often overlooked and underserved, including women of color and marginalized genders, and those released from incarceration or who have been sexually abused or suffered from domestic violence." She's on FaceBook  and she also coordinates her efforts through Voix Noire, which you can learn more about here: https://voixnoire.com  
RELIGIOUS EXPLORATION


-Leah Purcell, Director of Religious Education and Family Ministry (DREFM), lpurcell@albanyuu.org

-Elizabeth Baldes, Religious Education Coordinator, ebaldes@albanyuu.org


Family Chapel this Sunday at 11:30
We have one more session on our theme of Imagination with the book Fairey Houses. The Preschool – 1st grade, 2nd-5th grade, Crossing Paths (6th and 7th grade) and 8th grade Book Group will meet after Family Chapel 



The Parent/Caretaker Support Group will meet the first and third Wednesday of the month starting in February. Save the date for our next meeting Wed, Feb 3 starting at 8:00 pm
Facilitated by Leah Purcell, this is a drop-in time UU Parents and Caretakers to talk about raising children and youth with UU values. Here’s the link: https://tinyurl.com/Support-Group-for-UU-Parents


UU Family/Household Circle Training
Friday, Feb 12, 8-9 pm and Saturday, Feb 13, 10-11am

Min of 5 families/households needed to run this training.
This training is available to the whole congregation!

Leah Purcell has a tool she can share with families, couples, or any household to strengthen connections and communication at home. It’s a way to help practice your values where it counts most – at home, with the people you spend so much time with! The whole family or household does not need to come to learn – just two members is enough for to learn and bring the practice home. This two-part workshop is for adults, youth, and children. Parents/caretakers can put young ones to bed on Friday before attending; Saturday session will have some activities to include little ones - hopefully, they can also play nearby for this hour.

Fill out this form if you’re interested. If you have questions, contact Leah at dre@albanyuu.org


Multigenerational Game Night, Friday, Feb 5 6:30 – 8:00 pm
We had such a fun time our Dec Game Night, we’re doing it again! Join us for some time together for fun and games on Zoom. We’ll start with some “getting to know you” activities and then have two or three breakout rooms with different games. It’s super helpful to know in advance how many people are coming, but folks can decide to come at the last minute. Email Mike Myers at myersesq@aol.com with questions and to let him know by Feb 1 if you’re coming.
Here’s the zoom link to join us: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83215228638


The Treehouse is our own multigenerational community for Religious Education for Children and Youth. Families can find resources to practice UU-ism at home and supplementary materials for RE groups. Everyone - parents/caretakers, children and youth can share their written thoughts, pictures, videos they make. Click here to join:  https://tinyurl.com/Albany-Treehouse


Parents/caretakers can find resources in the RE Roundup this week.
JOYS and CONCERNS
To share your Joy or Sorrow with our Albany UU community, you may submit it on a yellow card during the service or by using our online form. 

Join us in keeping our members and friends in your thoughts as they share their joys and concerns.

Member, Bill Batt shares as sorrow. Karen Ann Donaldson, MD, long-time partner of Bill, died peacefully in her sleep at age 78, on Wednesday, January 27, 2021. She would have turned 79 on Tuesday, February 2. Cards may be sent to: 40 Autumn Drive, APT 108, Slingerlands, NY 12159

Need to Talk? Albany UU Pastoral Care Associates are here to listen!
Our Pastoral Care Associates have been trained in compassionate listening skills and are available to all members and friends of our congregation. To contact a Pastoral Care Associate, email: listeners@albanyuu.org, contact Rev. Sam Trumbore, the Albany UU office at 518.463.7135, or one of them personally. They are: Sharon Babala, Chuck Manning, Donna Meixner, Phil Rich, Randy Rosette, Sandy Stone, Dee VanRiper and Erik F. vonHausen.

Albany UU Caring Network
The Caring Network (CN) reflects the words of the Albany UU chalice lighting - “to sustain a vital and nurturing religious community.” The CN provides encouragement and short term support to Albany UU members who, due to hospitalization, sickness, loss, or isolation, need assistance. Services typically include transportation to medical appointments, meals and shopping during recovery, and friendly “check in’s” from Caring Network members. Please reach out to the Caring Network.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Essential Building Use Guidelines:
Find more information about our Building Use Guidelines during COVID HERE.




Learn about submitting announcements to for our virtual Sunday service and how to reserve a Zoom room for meetings and events here.


Other important resources, guidelines and information can be found on the Resource Page of our website, here.
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

Virtual Service Ushers - It's never too late to volunteer!
This is a great opportunity to volunteer on a Sunday morning! Ushers are needed on Sunday mornings to help provide a welcoming, safe and enjoyable virtual experience. We need folks who would be willing to volunteer to help. Tammy will provide a quick and simple training. PLEASE contact her if you'd like to learn more: admin@albanyuu.org.

YOU can make a difference!
We at Albany UU are making an effort to increase our visibility and connectivity online. YOU can help, and it's quick and easy! Simply like, follow and share pages and posts on any of our social media platforms, or leave a positive Facebook or Google review. Google Albany UU or find us here:
CONNECTIONS







Publication deadlines
This is an important reminder that the news and article deadline for Windows Weekly is 9:00 AM on Monday. Thank you for your cooperation.

Sign up for an online class

- Send an email to: registration@albanyuu.org
Regular events and meetings

Most of these events and meetings continue online, however dates and times may vary. Please contact the Team or Group Leader or email admin@albanyuu.org if you have questions.

Sundays       
11:45 AM     Inclusivity Team (2nd)
5:30 PM       Walker Book Group (2nd)
11:45 AM      Social Responsibilities Council (3rd)
11:45 AM      Green Sanctuary Committee (4th)

Mondays       
6:15 PM        Religious Education Council
                               (1st, Nov., Feb., May)

Tuesdays      
10:15 AM      Philosophy Discussion (weekly)

Wednesdays
10:00 AM     Ps and Qs (alternating)
7:00 PM     Albany UU Sings (alternating)

Thursdays    
6:30 PM       Board of Trustees (4th)
Going to miss a Sunday?

Online service is generally recorded

Sunday, Jan 24 watch it here.

Sunday, Jan 17 watch it here.

Sunday, Jan 3 watch it here.

Sunday, Dec 27 watch it here.

Thursday, Dec 24 watch it here.

Sunday, Dec 20 watch it here.

Sunday, Dec 13 watch it here.

Sunday, Dec 6 watch it here.

For previous services, pre-pandemic:
You can listen to the entire Albany UU Sunday service at home or on your mobile device. March 1 and 8 services are available as MP3 files on the Albany UU member resource website. Here is how to access:

username: AlbanyUU
password: EEthelredBrown405

Our sermon archive (http://members.albanyuu.org/wp/ - select Ministry/Sermon Archive on the left website menu) has pdf files of sermons texts (when available) and audio files of sermons. You can also request the office put a service on a CD.
First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany
Parking - when the building reopens: Parking is available on the street. On Sundays (and for some special events) Albany UU has permission to use the University at Albany’s Hawley Parking Lot on Robin Street at Washington Avenue.

Office hours:
The Albany UU Office is closed during this time of physical distancing. Sam, Leah, Tammy and Sapphire have their messages forwarded to their personal cell phones and are available by email.

Websites
General: www.AlbanyUU.org

Zoom use
To reserve Zoom for an Albany UU online meeting, contact Administrative Assistant Sapphire Correa (518.463.7135 or office@albanyuu.org).

Photo credit: Jeannie Thompson
First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany | 518.463.7135| 518.463.1429 | Admin@AlbanyUU.org | AlbanyUU.org