Hi there!
 
It's hard to believe, but there are only 5 weeks left of the Summer Share! We have had a wonderful summer with you all, so thank you for a great season so far. Let's not all get too sad, though- the Winter Share picks up right after the Summer Share quits, and we'd love to have you along!

We have a sweet and spicy bag for you all this week, featuring a variety of interesting flavors-- everything from apple cider to kohlrabi, chorizo to jalapeños, so keep reading to see what you'll be getting in your bags.
Check out @beched 's beautiful photos on Instagram from her trip on our Farm Tour last weekend: "Day Made. Just milked a cow and drank the fresh milk. I’m endlessly thankful for @freshforkmarket and for #cows in general!"
PRESSING APPLE CIDER
Not every apple in the orchard is picture perfect, but every apple is tasty. Apples with any type of damage, like scars and holes, are "graded out" when sorting the apples that are picked. Other common flaws in apples are scab and other fungi and mold-related diseases. These are completely harmless to us, but these fungi attack the apple and cause an imperfect finish.  And finally, some apples are just mishandled in picking and are bruised or damaged, and thus unsellable.

What to do with all these "seconds?" Turn them into apple cider. The flavor of apple cider, as a result, changes throughout the season based on what is being picked. In early season, like July and August, cider isn't generally pressed because the varieties being picked are quite tart - like Early Gold , Transparent , and Lodi . Now, in the heart of apple season, the sweeter varieties like Gala , Honey Crisp , Fuji , and Macintosh are coming off of the trees. Fortunately for us, Honey Crisp bruise very easily, so there will be quite a bit of that in this week's cider. 

The process for making apple cider is quite simple. Brian Geig at Geig Orchards in Seville gets extra apple seconds from Eshleman's in Clyde. The apples are loaded into a hopper, 20 bushel at a time, by forklift. The hopper feeds the apples onto a conveyor belt that takes them through a chlorinated wash, then into a rinse, and into a grinder that turns the apples into a mush. The ground up apples are then pumped into mesh baskets on a cider press - a hydraulic machine that looks a lot like a big accordion, minus the polka music. Brian can process about 7 bins - 140 bushels - of apples per hour, producing about 350 gallons of cider. He gets about 2.5 gallons of cider per bushel of apples. 

The cider is then pumped into a chill tank where it is chilled to safe temperatures, then it undergoes a UV pasteurization process that kills any harmful bacteria before being bottled.  

Apple cider is a delicious drink on its own but it's also a great ingredient: try it in place of water when braising a pork shoulder or when making glazed carrots. It can be used in smoothies, or mixed with something brown at your home bar for a "warm" Fall cocktail.    
We buy apples from a variety of orchards around NE Ohio, but two of our favorites are Eshleman's (pictured above) & Geig's.
Some reminders from our office
SETTLE UP YOUR ACCOUNT & USE YOUR CREDITS

Including this week, there are just five weeks left in the share! That means it's time to tie up all the loose ends: please sign into your account and make sure that your balance is $0 (or that you have a plan for paying it off in the next month), and that you are steadily using up your credits. All credits expire at the end of the season and cannot be moved to your winter account, so pick up some salmon or a Thanksgiving turkey !

COD SOLD OUT- BUT MORE SALMON LEFT

Our cod sold out really quickly this year, however we still have salmon left (cases and pieces.) Towards the end of the week we will be opening up purchasing to more groups, so if you wanted to guarantee your salmon order please sign in and purchase some online.

If you submitted a check to your stop for credits to buy salmon, you should have received an email this morning with instructions on finishing your order (or your order was completed at the stop with your Greeter.) If you have any questions about your order, please send us an email.
Featured Product
THE COOKIES ARE BACK!

Our amazing new baker & chef team down at Wholesome Valley Farm has been testing various cookie recipes for weeks, and they've landed on the perfect one: soft and chewy, sweet without being too much, and using locally- grown and milled flour and butter.

Each pack has 10 cookies-- and this week, we're offering a special introductory price of just $5 per pack!
Thanks to everyone who came out on the farm tour this past weekend! We hope you learned a lot, got stuffed and had as much of a blast as we did. Thanks to @huleah for the great pic of Trevor talking pigs!
Bag Contents
THE MINI
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Green Onions
Jalapeños
Lettuce

SMALL OMNIVORE
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Green Onions
Jalapeños
Lettuce
Kohlrabi
Apple Cider - ½ gall.
Chorizo - 1#
LARGE OMNIVORE
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Green Onions
Jalapeños
Lettuce
Kohlrabi
Apple Cider - ½ gall.
Chorizo - 1#
Roma Tomatoes - 3#
Pizza Dough - 2 balls
Pepperoni - 6 oz
SMALL VEGETARIAN
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Green Onions
Jalapeños
Lettuce
Kohlrabi
Apple Cider - ½ gall.
Black Beans - 1#
Zucchini - 2
Candy Onion
LARGE VEGETARIAN
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Green Onions
Jalapeños
Lettuce
Kohlrabi
Apple Cider - ½ gall.
Black Beans - 1#
Zucchini - 2
Candy Onion
Roma Tomatoes - 3#
Pizza Dough - 2 balls
Canned Peaches - 1 qt
VEGAN
Butternut Squash
Carrots
Green Onions
Jalapeños
Lettuce
Kohlrabi
Apple Cider - ½ gall.
Black Beans - 1#
Zucchini - 2
Candy Onion
Recipes featuring this week's share ingredients
Ingredients from share: Butternut Squash, Onion, Apple Cider
Ingredients from share: Chorizo, Zucchini, Jalapeños
Ingredients from share: Black Beans, Green Onions/Onion, Carrot, Jalapeños
Ingredients from share: Kohlrabi, Green Onions
For more of our recipes, click here .
More recipes online
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