January 2019
Monthly Newsletter
HAPPY NEW YEAR



ANNOUNCEMENTS
INDIANA PEDIATRIC FACILITY RECOGNITION PROGRAM
Application packets are now available. Interested  hospitals, please contact Program Manager, Margo Knefelkamp via email margo.knefelkamp@indianapolisems.org or phone 317-630-772 office, 317-523-4636 mobile.   Indiana hospital emergency departments may apply to be recognized as "Pediatric Ready" or "Pediatric Advanced." 

EMSC PEDIATRIC HEROES AWARD NOMINATION FORMS NOW AVAILABLE
iEMSC will now be taking nominations for the amazing work that happens on behalf of children 
all over the State of Indiana.  Please make your nomination today!  You can nominate your pediatric
healthcare hero today by completing this nomination form and then emailing it to

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
Do you have an educational event in the near future? Please contact iEMSC, to 
notify of your upcoming pediatric training opportunities or pediatric related event.

 
This newsletter focuses on the Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator (PECC) role and will highlight different tools and resources to help support this important position. Please take a moment to view this quarter's newsletter and to forward it along to your colleagues.  If you would like to start receiving this newsletter please email  margo.knefelkamp@indianapolisems.org


PEDIATRIC ADVOCATE CORNER
NATIONAL IMPAIRED DRIVING PREVENTION 

According to NHTSA, 37,133 people were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2017, and 29 percent (10,874) of those fatalities occurred in crashes in which a driver had a blood alcohol concentration over the legal limit of .08 grams per deciliter. The holidays prove to be extra dangerous to drivers as more people-drivers and pedestrians alike-are out on the roads.

Drunk driving isn't the only risk on the road: Drug-impaired driving is also an increasing problem on our nation's roads. If drivers are impaired by any substance-alcohol or drugs-they should not get behind the wheel of a vehicle. Driving while impaired is illegal, period. The bottom line is this: If You Feel Different, You Drive Different. It's that simple.

Drinking and driving should never be combined. It's essential to plan a sober ride in advance if the holiday celebration will include alcohol. The alternative could change your life, not to mention the lives of your passengers, of pedestrians, or of other drivers and passengers nearby.

For more information, visit www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov.

Information provided from the  National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
SPECIAL INTEREST
STORE AND USE MEDICINE SAFELY
 
Each year, approximately 60,000 young children are treated in emergency departments after getting into medicines on their own or after dosing errors by adults. After ensuring that your children get the right amount of medicine, it's just as important to make sure that the medicine is immediately returned to a safe storage location.
Store medicines up and away and out of the sight and reach of young children.

Five simple tips to safe storage at home and on-the-go:
  • Choose a Safe Spot: Walk around your house to find the safest place to keep your medicines. The location should be up and away and out of the sight and reach of young children.
  • Lock the Safety Cap: Always relock the cap on a medicine bottle. If the bottle has a locking cap that turns, twist it until you hear the click or cannot twist anymore.
  • Put Medicines Away: After locking the safety cap, it's important to always put medicines back in their safe storage location. Curious children act fast, so never leave medicine out on a kitchen counter or at a sick child's bedside, even if you have to give it again in a few hours.
  • Remind Guests: Ask family members, houseguests, and other visitors to keep purses, bags, or coats that have medicine in them up and away and out of sight when they are in your home.
  • While Traveling: While staying with family or friends or at a hotel, find a safe storage place that is out of sight and reach of young children, like a high cabinet. If you're in a hotel room, try the passcode-protected room safe for safe storage.
You may reach the Indiana Poison Center by calling 1-800-222-1222

Information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Medication Safety Program

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EDUCATION AND  PEDIATRIC RELATED EVENTS

Upcoming Courses:
  • Indiana School Nurse Emergency Care Course.  Indiana EMSC and the Indiana Department of Education are pleased to announce the Indiana School Nurse Emergency Care course. This course is a hybrid course with an online portion to be completed prior to attending a one-day in-person training.  Online training modules include topics such as:
  • The School Nurse Role in Emergency Care
  • Legal Issues in Nursing
  • Assessment and Triage
  • Medical Emergencies
  • Abdominal and Genitourinary Emergencies
  • EENT and Dental Emergencies
  • Emergencies Involving Mental or Behavioral Health
  • School Emergency Response and Crisis Management
In person training TBD Spring 2019.
  • Child Passenger Safety Technician Scholarship Program: The Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST) Scholarship Program, sponsored through the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH), Division of Trauma and Injury Prevention, is dedicated to preventing injuries and trauma throughout Indiana. Through the Maternal Child and Health Services (TITLE 5) grant, recipients can be reimbursed up to $250 for participating in a training course to become a CPST. The CPST Scholarship Program funds must be used towards any fees related to the training class, including: the cost of the class; travel; lodging; parking services; or any equipment needed in order to attend the class. For more information about this program, please contact Paravdeep Nijjar, Injury Prevention Program Coordinator for ISDH. Click here for more information.
  • FREE TRAINING - The Center for Global Health at the Colorado School of Public Health Online Pediatrics in Disasters Course
    Although a quarter of the world's population is under the age of five, 50 percent of the victims of man-made and natural disasters are children. Children are vulnerable in disasters for physiological, psychological and developmental reasons. Too often medical staff is ill-prepared for pediatric triage and emergency stabilization in terms of knowledge and experience, as well as equipment and supplies. The Pediatrics in Disaster training program trains health care providers to prioritize life-saving care for children in disasters. Because of the vulnerability of children and adolescents, pediatricians and other health professionals must ensure that local, regional and national disaster preparedness planning meets the specific needs of children and adolescents.  Click here to register.
Contact Information:

Program Director:
Elizabeth Weinstein, M.D.

Program Manager:
Margo Knefelkamp, M.B.A.

3930 Georgetown Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46254
margo.knefelkamp@indianapolisems.org
(317) 630-7742