Sprout
Good Food Project Garden Newsletter November 2017 Sprout  
 
Enjoy Growing Some Fall Vegetables!
Fall Vegetables: Above left - Cabbage, broccoli, Swiss Chard, Curly Kale, Red and Southern Broad Leaf Mustard Greens.
 
Fall vegetables are wonderful plants to grow in Central Louisiana; they are grown for their roots, bulbs, stalks and leaves. Often, they are called cool-season vegetables. These vegetables, that include beets, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, and spinach have a better cold tolerance than summer vegetables like tomatoes, melons, and cucumbers that are technically considered fruit. Both fall and summer vegetables have specific soil needs. Fall vegetables need a slightly more acidic soil and grow their best in temperatures ranging between 50-70 degrees, as long as they have plenty of water.
Most of them can tolerate light frosts - broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, also called cruciferous vegetables, can freeze solid for a few days and then rebound. The sugar in them acts as an antifreeze, making them sweeter to the taste.
Cool-season vegetables accumulate and store nutrients if their growing conditions are good. Some vegetables, like beets store nutrients in their roots, leaf lettuce in its leaves, and cauliflower in its leaves and stalks.
 
Fall vegetables need steady, continuous growth. A spring-like heat-wave or  drought-like conditions that we are experiencing in fall 2017, can cause these vegetables to "bolt," or send up a flower stalk. If the vegetable starts to bolt, it won't get any better. A plant will spend all its resources to support and produce flowers and seeds. The nutrients get drained from the leaves, roots, and stems, causing them to become tough and stringy. A best practice is to harvest leafy fall vegetables like spinach and lettuce at the first sign of a flower stalk, while the leaves are still succulent. Exceptions to this are the cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, kale, and cauliflower.
 
Fall Vegetables:
  • Alliums like garlic, onions, shallots, leeks, and chives.
  • Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, collards, and Asian greens.
  • Leafy vegetables like lettuce, spinach, and Swiss chard.
    Root vegetables like carrots, beets, and parsnips.
  • Stalk vegetables like celery and fennel. 

Want to learn more about sustainable gardening? Please call Good Food Project to learn more about our programming, contact GFP at 318-445-2773 or GoodFoodProject@fbcenla.org 


For information about partnering with the Good Food Project, or for other GFP program opportunities, contact the Good Food Project staff at 318.445.2773 or via email: fboudreaux@fbcenla.org, or cbaker@fbcenla.org,  and on the web: www.goodfoodprojectcenla.org    
Recipe of the Month
Riced Cauliflower Stir Fry
 Jackie Duncan and Jane Fillette, GFP Advisory Council Members admiring a giant cauliflower in the Food Bank edible landscape raised bed
Did you know?
  • Eating cauliflower may help reduce the risk of certain cancers
  • Cauliflower helps fight inflammation in the body
  • Cauliflower helps improve digestion and helps detoxify the body
Ingredients
Vegetable Oil
2 large eggs, beaten (optional)
Salt to taste
1 Cup chopped green onions (5-6) separate the green tops from the white bulb portion
3 Minced garlic cloves
1 Tablespoon finely chopped fresh ginger
1 2-lb head of cauliflower  or 2 lbs packaged riced cauliflower
5 Tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 Teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 Teaspoon rice vinegar
1 Teaspoon Asian sesame oil
(1/4 cup cashews - optional) 
Directions
1. Grate cauliflower and set aside unless using packaged riced cauliflower
2. Heat 2 teaspoons of vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the eggs (if desired) and a pinch of salt and scramble until eggs are cooked. Transfer to a small plate and set aside. Wipe the pan clean with paper towels.
3. Add 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil to the pan and set over medium heat. Add the light green onions, garlic, and ginger and cook, stirring often, until softened but not browned - 3-4 minutes. Add the peas and carrots and continue cooking until the cauliflower rice is tender-crisp and the vegetables are warmed through. Stir in the rice vinegar, sesame oil, dark green portion of the green onions, nuts (if using) and eggs (if using). Season to taste, adding additional soy sauce, if needed. Serve hot
 

 

In November plant:

  • Beets
  • Borage
  • Cabbage (Plants)
  • Carrot
  • Celery (Seed or the end of a celery stalk)
  • Chamomile
  • Chard, Swiss
  • Chervil
  • Chinese Cabbage (Plants)
  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Collards (Plants)
  • Dill
  • Endive
  • Fennel
  • Feverfew
  • French Tarragon
  • Garlic
  • Garlic Chives
  • Kale (Seeds, Plants)
  • Kohlrabi (Plants)
  • Lavender
  • Lemon Balm
  • Lettuce (Seeds, Plants)
  • Marjoram
  • Mexican Tarragon
  • Mints
  • Mustard Greens
  • Onion, Leek (Seeds or sets)
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Radishes
  • Rosemary
  • Rutabagas
  • Sage
  • Shallots (Sets)
  • Sorrell
  • Spinach
  • Thyme 
  • Turnips
     

 In December plant:

  • Beet
  • Borage
  • Cabbage (Plants)
  • Carrot
  • Celery (Seed or the end of a celery stalk)
  • Chamomile
  • Chard, Swiss
  • Chervil
  • Chinese Cabbage (Plant)
  • Chives
  • Cilantro
  • Collards (Plants)
  • Dill
  • Endive
  • Fennel
  • Feverfew
  • French Tarragon
  • Garlic

  • Garlic Chives

  • Kale (Seed, Plants)
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lavender
  • Leek
  • Lemon Balm
  • Lettuce
  • Marjoram
  • Mexican Tarragon
  • Mints
  • Mustard Greens
  • Onion, Leek (Seeds or sets)
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Radishes
  • Rosemary
  • Rutabagas
  • Sage
  • Shallots (Sets)
  • Sorrell
  • Spinach
  • Thyme
  • Turnips

 

  

 

 

 

Highlights from this month's school and youth program gardens - L. S. Rugg Elementary, Good Food Project demonstration garden, Natchitoches Boys and Girls Club of El Camino Real, St. Joseph School in Plaucheville, and Alma Redwine Elementary .

                               

 

Garden News

 

Want to help a school garden in your area? Please call Good Food Project to learn more about our sustainable school garden programming, contact GFP at 318-445-2773 or GoodFoodProject@fbcenla.org 

 

 Fall work days were held at several schools this month including Our Lady of Prompt Succor Elementary, NSU Lab School, a new school installation took place at Nebo Elementary in LaSalle Parish and students at Lessie Moore Elementary in Pineville made their first-ever harvest of radishes! #schoolgardensmatter #kidsgarden 

School Garden Installation at Lessie Moore Elementary - Sponsor: Christy Parker 

    Rapides Parish schools: A fall workday at Martin Park Elementary - school sponsor: Laken Fountain and a new school garden installation at Nachman Elementary, school sponsor: Erica Adams 

 

  For more information about how your organization or school can partner or volunteer with Good Food Project contact us at goodfoodproject@fbcenla.org or call 318-445-2773 


Workday Wednesday

Come be a part of our community of gardeners at the Good Food Project of the Food Bank of Central Louisiana as we all learn together! Help us make a difference in Cenla! Join us any Wednesday at the Good Food Project demonstration garden at 3223 Baldwin Avenue  from 7:30-11:30 AM for WORKDAY WEDNESDAYSCome out and harvest with us and learn new things about gardening and make new friends! Or, if you are interested in volunteering at one of our off-site garden programs, please contact us at GoodFoodProject@fbcenla.org 

If Wednesdays aren't good for you, call us to set up another volunteer day! 318-445-2773 

 

A diverse group of volunteers come to the Good Food Project demonstration garden on Wednesday mornings - pictured above: Ryan Garrett, Sam Mills, Shana Lazarone, and Jackie Duncan - #volunteersrock!

 

 

 

Garden Tips:
 Broccoli and vegetables that belong to the cabbage family will fare better against pests like caterpillars, if companion planted with onion, garlic, celery, beets, dill, sage, rosemary, and geranium.       
Volunteers of 2017 - We Salute You! 
 

 

 As 2017 fades away, we take this time to sincerely offer our thanks and gratitude for the folks who have helped make this another successful year for the Good Food Project - our committed, dedicated volunteers!  Volunteers help our program in a multitude of ways, through fund-raising efforts, on Work Day Wednesdays in the demonstration garden, at community garden sites, at schools, and at youth organizations. The maintenance of all the gardens associated with the Good Food Project calls for physical effort, and a cooperative spirit from those who volunteer that helps fulfill the Food Bank's mission of alleviating hunger in Central Louisiana. The Good Food Project will strive to meet its goals to support a culture of health in Cenla schools as it also continues to support and leverage existing gardens sites in service to educating and connecting children to healthier food options. 

 

GFP welcomes  individual and organizational volunteers at our community gardens and at the Good Food Project on Wednesday mornings in the demonstration garden, 3223 Baldwin Avenue - Food Bank of Central Louisiana 71301 - 318-445-2773.