Future Energy eNews
IN THIS ISSUE
Greetings!
 
Once in a decade a documentary is produced that outshines all others on the subject by far. The newly released “The Phenomenon” (2020) with narrator Peter Coyote and Official Trailer on YouTube is just that one with a slow burn buildup and technology climax that is well worth the wait. With Presidents and top Senators in the movie, it brings the UFO subject up to the standard of a Congressional Hearing (also included), with never before seen footage, historically accurate details, and only $3.99 to view: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eviKoBUIkWg, also on Netflix (88% on Rotten Tomatoes rating). We hope this will facilitate our galactic future.
 
A nice gesture from EngineerLive.com brings us a FREE copy of their monthly magazine with an online viewer (Yudu) that nicely flips pages on wind turbines at sea, blue energy, game changing grid technology, and much more: 
 
Story #1 offers us a view of our near future with German supplied flying cars with vertical takeoff and landing. That’s not all however, since these will compete with Uber and Lyft for smart phone reserved flights around Orlando and Tampa, Florida. Furthermore, we feature it in our Future Energy eNews since these are all-electric flying cars with a one-hour charge.
 
Story #2 is exciting with a new contactless approach, reported in Nature, to producing hydrogen by using microwave catalysis to induce the water-splitting at low temperature. Valencia University in Spain is the source of this innovation.
 
Story #3 is a great bioenergetics answer to the recent complex discussion about vaccines and the question of whether they can prevent the initial infection from a coronavirus. Medical researchers at Columbia University have come up with the answer in the form of a nasal spray. Specifically, it is a intranasal fusion inhibitory lipopeptide that prevents direct contact SARS-CoV-2 transmission as reported on bioRiv: DOI: 10.1101/2020.11.04.361154 Similar to colloidal silver spray, it may prevent infection in people exposed to the new coronavirus, since it blocks the usual pathway for the virus to enter the body. “People who cannot be vaccinated or do not develop immunity will particularly benefit from the spray. The antiviral is easily administered and, based on the scientists’ experience with other respiratory viruses, protection would be immediate and last for at least 24 hours. The scientists hope to rapidly advance the preventative approach to human trials with the goal of containing transmission during this pandemic.”
 
Story #4 is a breakthrough close to one of our IRI Projects on “zero bias diode energy harvesting”. With specially designed tiny infrared antennas, a semiconductor diode is used to convert waste heat into electricity by treating it as electromagnetic waves in the terahertz range. This discovery has boosted interest in our institute’s research on this subject since the Saudi team uses zero applied voltage (zero bias) that is a passive feature that switches the MIM diodes on when IR energy is present, harvesting energy solely from the radiation. A paper detailing the project – Optical rectification through an Al2O3 based MIM passive rectenna at 28.3 THz – has been published in Materials Today Energy.

Story #5 is a new avenue for producing hydrogen from an abundant resource: sea water. Now Penn State University researchers have reached close to the ideal of producing hydrogen from wind or solar by electrolyzing sea water into H2 and O2. By using a semi-permeable membrane, the chlorine from salt in the water is prevented from entering the reaction and chloride ions are left behind. Originally developed for reverse osmosis, the ion-exchange membrane does the trick and may become a commercial product sometime soon.
 
Onward and Upward!

Tom Valone, PhD
Editor
1) Central Florida Lands Hub for Flying Cars
The nation’s first regional hub for “flying cars” is being built in central Florida and once completed in five years, the vehicles will be able to take passengers from Orlando to Tampa in a half hour, officials said Wednesday.
The Tavistock Development Corp. said it was constructing a Jetsons-like aviation facility in Orlando’s Lake Nona area, the mixed-use planned community it built. Lake Nona already is home to several medical and research facilities.
The aircraft will be supplied by Lilium, a Germany-based aviation company that manufacturers the industry’s only five-passenger “electric vertical takeoff and landing” aircraft. At the moment, the Lilium Jets can travel up to 185 miles (nearly 300 kilometers) on a one-hour charge.Passengers wanting a ride on the aircraft will be able to book reservations via their phones in a way similar to ride-share companies Uber and Lyft, officials said.
2) H2 New Water-splitting technique brings Green Hydrogen
Nature, November 2020

Researchers in Spain have uncovered a new approach to producing hydrogen via water splitting which could help overcome some of the drawbacks to this promising alternative fuel source.
In a study published in Nature Energy, Valencia University researcher José Manuel Serra, professor José M Catalá-Civera, and their colleagues describe a method for producing hydrogen gas by blasting microwave radiation at a watery chemical soup. The approach could make extracting hydrogen from water cheaper, and more importantly, reduce the capital costs of the necessary machinery.

RELATED ARTICLE::
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-020-00720-6
3) Nasal Spray Can Prevent Coronavirus
Scitech Daily, November 2020

A nasal antiviral created by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons blocked transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in ferrets, suggesting the nasal spray also may prevent infection in people exposed to the new coronavirus.
The compound in the spray—a lipopeptide developed by Anne Moscona, MD, and Matteo Porotto, PhD, professors in the Department of Pediatrics and directors of the Center for Host-Pathogen Interaction—is designed to prevent the new coronavirus from entering host cells.
4) Diode Harvests Infrared Energy to Generate Electricity
The Engineer, November 2020

The team from KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) has developed a proof-of-concept device that utilises infrared radiation, plus waste heat from industrial processes, by transforming quadrillionth-of-a-second wave signals into useful electricity.
Infrared heat can be harvested 24 hours a day and one way to achieve this is to treat waste or infrared heat as high-frequency electromagnetic waves. Using appropriately designed antennas, collected waves are sent to a rectifier, often a semiconductor diode, that converts alternating signals into an electric current.

RELATED ARTICLE
https://www.cell.com/joule/fulltext/S2542-4351(20)30445-1?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email
5) Generating Hydrogen Fuel from Seawater
HydrogenFuel News.com November 2020

The idea behind being able to make hydrogen fuel from sea water is to make it easier to power green fuel generation through wind and solar energy. In this way, these renewable sources of electricity can be converted into fuel that can be stored and transported, said Bruce Logan, professor of environmental engineering and Evan Pugh University professor.
“Hydrogen is a great fuel, but you have to make it,” said Logan. “The only sustainable way to do that is to use renewable energy and produce it from water. You also need to use water that people do not want to use for other things, and that would be sea water. So, the holy grail of producing hydrogen would be to combine the sea water and the wind and solar energy found in coastal and offshore environments.”

If you enjoy this FREE servicetake individual action by clicking on the donate button. You can see our latest Annual Report Here.We are a 501 (C)3 Non Profit Institute and your donations are fully deductible to the maximum allowed by law. Your generous support makes this free service possible. THANK YOU!

Contact us: 301-220-0440| enews@integrityresearchinstitute.org