November 7, 2014
Table of Contents:
Tenure-Track Position: Assistant Professor/Associate Professor Department of Pan-African Studies Kent State University
Tenure-Track Assistant or Associate Position Department of Pan-African Studies Kent State University
Call for Papers: Commemorating and Critically Assessing the Life and Work of Maya Angelou
Call for Papers: Ten Point Program For Reparations for African Americans in the United States
Commemorating and Critically Assessing the Life and Work of Le Roi Jones/Amiri Baraka
The Eric Williams Memorial Collection 16th Annual FIU Eric Williams Lecture Makes the Case for Slave Trade Reparations
Vacancy Announcement-Wellesley College Africana Studies Department
Lapidus Center Fellowships - deadline extended
THE LOUIS E. BURNHAM AWARD WELCOMES APPLICATIONS

Tenure-Track Position: Assistant Professor/Associate Professor 

Department of Pan-African Studies 

Kent State University

 

The Department of Pan-African Studies at Kent State University invites applications for a tenure-track, Assistant or Associate Professor position beginning Fall 2015.

 

We seek applicants whose primary area of expertise is in Critical Race Theory and/or Africana Public Policy, with secondary areas open. We are particularly interested in candidates who have expertise on issues affecting Africa and the African Diaspora, particularly as they relate to health, education and immigration. The Department is especially interested in applicants whose secondary areas align with its existing or emerging strengths, including but not limited to Community Activism and Organizing, Gender, Race and Sex, Government and Social Systems, and the Sociology of Health. All members of the Department teach upper level courses in their areas of expertise and introductory courses, which make significant contribution to the College of Arts and Sciences Core Educational Requirements.

 

The candidate should demonstrate a well developed and vibrant research program, a strong publication record, grant writing strength and evidence of teaching excellence at the undergraduate levels. A Ph.D. is required, with preference for that degree being in Africana Studies or related field.

 

The Department holds the Institute of African American Affairs, the Center of Pan-African Culture, the African Community Theatre and the Uumbaji Gallery, all of which offer opportunities for collaborative community research and mentoring/professional development

 

Review of applications will begin December 1, 2014 and continue until the position is filled. Please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, teaching statement, two writing samples, instructional materials such as course syllabi, and three letters of reference to dpas@kent.edu or to

 

Chair, Search Committee

Department of Pan-African Studies

Kent State University

P.O. Box 5190

Kent, Ohio 44240

 

Kent State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from candidates who would enhance the diversity of the University's Faculty.

 

 



Tenure-Track Assistant or Associate Position

Department of Pan-African Studies 

Kent State University

 

Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies invites applications for an Assistant Professor or Associate Professor position beginning Fall 2015.

 

We seek candidates who are able to teach Pan-African Theatre with a minor area in the Caribbean and Latin America and whose creative work addresses issues of race, gender, sexuality and class in relation to people and cultures of African descent. It is expected that this individual's training fulfills the needs of regional, national and community theatres and will strongly support a theatre program that is community-based and committed to examining the myriad of social justice issues faced by people of African descent, as well as similar issues faced by Native and Latino Americans. The individual is expected to maintain relationships with local black theatre institutions such as the Karamu House in Cleveland and national organizations like Black Theatre Network and the Association for Theatre inHigher Education, which will enhance Kent State's relationships with the artistic community in Cleveland and surrounding areas.

 

The successful candidate will teach introductory and advanced courses in both the School of Theatre and Dance and Pan-African Studies.

 

An MFA or Ph.D. in Theatre or related field is required. The candidate should have a minimum of 3 three years of directing experience or equivalent and a vibrant creative scholarship record.  He or she will be expected to provide teaching excellence at the undergraduate and graduate level.

 

Review of applications will begin December 1, 2014 and continue until the position is filled. Please submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, teaching statement, two pieces of evidence of creative scholarship, and three letters of reference to dpas@kent.edu or to

 

Chair, Search Committee, Pan-African Theatre

Department of Pan-African Studies

Kent State University

P.O. Box 5190

Kent, Ohio 44240

 

Kent State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from candidates who would enhance the diversity of the University's Faculty.

   

 



Call for Papers:

Commemorating and Critically Assessing the Life and Work of Maya Angelou

In the wake of the passing of cultural icon, Maya Angelou, TBS is putting together a special issue devoted to her life, work, and legacy.  Her career ranged from poetry and autobiography/memoir to dance, film, theatre, and an engagement with generations of arts and politics in the United States and Africa.  Receptions of her and her work ranged from racial spokesperson and firebrand during the Civil Rights/Black Power movement to Poet Laureate, media presence, and arguably the most popular black poet for generations of Americans - certainly in the wake of her often satirized work with Hallmark greeting cards and her role as "spiritual counsel" for Oprah Winfrey and the new black media elite.  In the spirit of her unique and wide-ranging career, we welcome tributes, critical responses, scholarly engagement, and works of historical or personal reflection.   Submissions on any aspect of her work, life or influence, are encouraged. We are open to public intellectual work and all forms of non-fiction, but we must emphasize that TBS/The Black Scholar is primarily a scholarly journal that prioritizes political work.

 

Deadline for submissions is September 1st, 2015. Please see our submission guidelines for further information.

 

http://www.theblackscholar.org/call-for-papers/the-black-scholar-tbs-call-for-contributions-maya-angelou/  

 



Call for Papers:
Ten Point Program For Reparations for African Americans in the United States


TBS/The Black Scholar is joining with the Journal of African American History (JAAH), The Journal of Black Psychology, Souls: A Critical Review of Black Politics and Culture, The Journal of Pan-African Studies, African American Learners, The Review of Black Political Economy and other African American scholarly publications in issuing a "Call for Papers" for upcoming special issues and ongoing forums on reparations, specifically exploring potential items to be included in a "Ten Point Program" for reparations payments to African Americans in the United States. TBS is soliciting manuscripts that provide a rationale for reparations and specify how reparations payments could be used to reconstruct African American civil society so as to strengthen and democratize African American social institutions and improve the quality of life of African Americans in the United States, especially the economic and educational conditions for children and youth.

 

Deadline for submissions is June 4th, 2015. Please see our submission guidelines for further information.

 

Download Complete CFP 


http://www.theblackscholar.org/call-for-papers/ten-point-program-for-reparations/

 



Commemorating and Critically Assessing
the Life and Work of Le Roi Jones/Amiri Baraka

"My writing reflects my own growth and expansion, and at the same time the society in which I have existed throughout this longish confrontation. Whether it is politics, music, literature, or the origins of language, there is a historical and time/place/condition reference that will always try to explain exactly why I was saying both how and for what."

 

- Amiri Baraka 1990

TBS is issuing a "Call for Papers" for an upcoming special issue commemorating and critically assessing the life and work of Le Roi Jones/Amiri Baraka (October 7, 1934- January 9, 2014). We are particularly interested in works that engage what Baraka described as his "motion-movement," the development of his praxis throughout his life. We are seeking critical essays that explore his biography, art, and politics. We welcome work that critically examines his life before (formative years, experience in the U.S. Air Force and at Howard University) and during the four periods described by William J. Harris: The Beat Period (1957-1962), the Transitional Period (1963-1965), the Black Nationalist Period (1965-1974), and the Third World Marxist Period (1974-2014).

 

We seek work grounded in the transdiscipline of Black/Africana studies generally or specifically utilizing concepts, theories, paradigms, and methodologies drawn from any of the transdiscipline's subfields (African American history, literature, music, political science, psychology, etc.). In addition to exploration of his major works-Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note, Blues People, The Dutchman, Home, Black Music, Four Black Revolutionary Plays, Black Fire, The Autobiography of Le Roi Jones/Amiri Baraka, The Motion of History, and Digging: The Soul of Afro-American Classical Music, we are also interested in essays that explore seminal essays such as "The Changing Same R&B and the New Black Music)," "Technology and Ethos," "Afro-American Literature and Class Struggle," "The 'Blues Aesthetic' and the 'Black Aesthetic': Aesthetics as the Continuing History of a Political Culture." Finally, we welcome articles that examine Baraka's role in the struggles of his times, his involvement in the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, the 1967 Newark Rebellion, The Committee for a Unified NewArk, The Congress of African Peoples/The Revolutionary Communist League, The Gary Convention, The National Black Political Assembly, and the National Black Independent Political Party.

 

Deadline for submissions is March 4th, 2015. Please see our submission guidelines for further information.


http://www.theblackscholar.org/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-commemorating-and-critically-assessing-the-life-and-work-of-le-roi-jonesamiri-baraka/

 

 



The Eric Williams Memorial Collection

16th Annual FIU Eric Williams Lecture Makes the Case for
Slave Trade Reparations


MIAMI, FL. (October 30, 2014) - To a packed audience of more than 200, the Prime Minister of Saint Lucia, Hon. Kenny Anthony, delivered the thought-provoking 16th Annual Eric E. Williams Memorial Lecture at Florida International University on October 17, 2014.

"Reparations and 21st Century Development: The Silence Is Broken and We Speak to the World" ably addressed CARICOM'S political stance on slave trade reparations, made possible by Eric Williams' 1944 groundbreaking study on the abolition and emancipation of British West Indian slavery, Capitalism and Slavery. The book re-framed the historiography of the British trans-Atlantic slave trade and its concomitant European incarnations. Popularly referred to as The Williams Thesis, this landmark text - translated into eight languages including Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Turkish and this year, Korean - established the contribution of Caribbean slavery to the development of both Britain and America. It continues to inform today's ongoing debate and remains "years ahead of its time...this profound critique is still the foundation for studies of imperialism and economic development," according to the New York Times.

In a determined and measured fashion, entirely consistent with his legal background, Prime Minister Anthony discussed recent precedents of reparatory justice made by Great Britain to the Mau Mau freedom fighters of Kenya - to the tune of 20 million pounds sterling; and the payment of some 455 million dollars to an indigenous community in the US. The most well known case of compensation for historical wrongs, of course, remains that of the Jewish Holocaust for which, as late as 2013, Germany had agreed to pay survivors almost 800 million euros. "These awards suggest," stated the Prime Minister, "that the world has begun to understand and accept the idea of compensation...[for the] 'value extraction' ... wealth, labour, liberty, dignity, and everything else [wrested by] one section of the community, the free section ...from the enslaved community." The most egregious example of reverse reparatory justice can be found in Haiti, which won a war of national liberation and was declared a free nation in 1804. In its independence constitution of 1805, the world's first black republic promptly abolished slavery and slave trading and declared them crimes. In 1825, after 21 years of nationhood, Haiti was forced by the French led pro-slavery international community, to agree to pay reparations of 150 million gold francs (later reduced to 90 million) to former slavers in France - for the loss of their 'property.' Haiti's 'debt' was not satisfied until 1947, almost a century and a half later, leaving the small island nation seemingly intractably impoverished and the national psyche irreparably wounded.

Established in 1999, FIU's annual Eric Williams Lecture honors the distinguished Caribbean statesman, consummate academic and historian, and author of several other books. Eric E. Williams was also the first Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago and Head of Government for a quarter of a century until his death in 1981. He led the country to Independence from Britain in 1962 and onto Republicanism in 1976.

Among prior Eric Williams Memorial Lecture speakers have been: the late John Hope Franklin, one of America's premier historians of the African-American experience; Kenneth Kaunda, former President of the Republic of Zambia; Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas; Mia Mottley, Attorney General of Barbados; Beverly Anderson-Manley, former First Lady of Jamaica; Portia Simpson Miller, now Prime Minister of Jamaica; the celebrated civil rights activist Angela Davis; and prize-winning Haitian author Edwige Danticat.
 
The Lecture, FIU's first named and longest running, seeks to provide an intellectual forum for the examination of pertinent issues in Caribbean and African Diaspora history and politics. It is co-sponsored by FIU's: Department of English, Latin American and Caribbean Center, AADS Graduate Students Association, Caribbean Students Association, Council of Student Organizations; Milton Adams/Karen M. Linger; Lenor Ancilla Armstrong; Reginald Barker; Elliot & Sandra Bastien; Bilmor With Advertising Specialties, Inc.; Rendell Brewster; Dr. & Mrs. Bradford Brown; Anthony Bryan; Leslye Danglade; Hayden Davis; Dr. & Mrs. Dennis Dove; EC Worldwide Travel; Edwards & Partners; Leon & Eunice Francis; Diane Galloway's Herbal Gardens, Inc.; Lew E. & Jill Garland; Joan Hinkson; Hometrust Mortgage Co.; Rev. Canon & Mrs. Winston Joseph; Joy's Roti Delight; Leroy & Anne Lashley; Miami Dade College; Neki Mohan; Ronnie & Sumin Quan-Vie; Keith & June Richards; Lenny & Gemme Roach; Royal Funeral Service; Mervyn Solomon; Split N's Salon; T&T Community at Christ the King; Radcliff Thomas; Trinidad and Tobago Independence Ball Committee, Inc.; Welch, Morris & Associates.

The Lecture is also supported by The Eric Williams Memorial Collection Research Library, Archives and Museum at the University of the West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago campus), which was inaugurated by former U.S. Secretary of State, Colin L. Powell in 1998. It was named to UNESCO's prestigious Memory of the World Register in 1999.

http://aswadiaspora.org/announcement-attachments/FIU%20EWMC%202014%20post%20press%20release.pdf

 

 



Vacancy Announcement for Non TT Position

WELLESLEY COLLEGE, Wellesley, MA

Africana Studies

The Africana Studies Department at Wellesley College invites applications for a three-year, non-tenure-track position for a social scientist with specialization in Development Economics, Political Economy, or Psychology. Applicants should have teaching competence in the African Diaspora and Africa. Qualifications: Ph.D (preferred) ABD (considered.)  The position is at the rank of lecturer and will start in September, 2015. We are seeking candidates who are committed to excellence in teaching and engaged in scholarly research. The successful candidate will teach four courses a year at both the introductory and advanced levels. Applications should include a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, a description of teaching and research interests and three letters of reference. Applications will be reviewed as they are received, but should be submitted no later than November 15, 2014. Wellesley College is an EO/AA educational institution and employer. The College is committed to increasing the diversity of the college community and the curriculum. Candidates who believe they will contribute to that goal are encouraged to apply. Applications should be sent to: Search Committee, Africana Studies Department, Wellesley College, 106 Central St., Wellesley, MA 02481. Tel. 781 283 2563 Fax: 781-283-3672.

 

For more information about being a faculty member at Wellesley please see:

 

 http://www.wellesley.edu/DeanCollege/Diversity/Open_pos/prospectfac.pdf

 

 



Lapidus Center Fellowships - deadline extended
 

The Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library, offers five short-term fellowships to support visiting scholars from outside the New York metropolitan area. Fellowships are awarded for a period of three months (March-May) at the Schomburg Center with a stipend of $6,000. 
 

The Lapidus Center also offers two long-term fellowships (September 2015-February 2016) to assist scholars whose research on transatlantic slavery can benefit from extended access to the Schomburg Center's resources. Fellowships are awarded for six months at the Schomburg Center with a stipend of $30,000.

 

Deadlines: December 15, 2014.

 

For more information and to apply, go to  

http://www.nypl.org/locations/tid/64/node/270350

 



THE LOUIS E. BURNHAM AWARD

WELCOMES APPLICATIONS

The Louis E. Burnham Award is granted each year to an individual whose
work reflects the interests and values of Louis Burnham's life. Those interests included:
  • racial justice in urban areas and the U.S. South
  • human rights
  • socially engaged journalism
  • African-American politics
  • youth leadership
Commemorating Burnham's lifelong engagement with progressive causes, the
award recognizes the work of journalists, social justice activists and scholars who
have amply demonstrated their commitment to racial justice and the advancement of the African-American community. The Award consists of a grant of $5,000 to be used to
support the work of the recipient.

Interested applicants should send a resume, a two-page statement of interest and two
letters of recommendation to: louisburnhamaward@gmail.com

The statement of interest should address how the applicant's work manifests the interests and values noted above and how the award will be used to advance that work.
Applications should be received by December 1, 2014.

At the end of the award year, the recipient will be expected to provide the Louis E.
Burnham Award Fund Committee with a brief written summary of the purposes to which
the grant was put.

Contributions to the Fund are deeply appreciated and may be mailed to:
Louis E. Burnham Award Fund
189 Maple Street
Brooklyn, New York 11225

 


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