Adopt an orange cat today...or a black cat...or an orange & black cat. How about an orange and black dog? We are celebrating the colors of October by encouraging you to come to the ACAC Adoption Center and select your next pet from the array of orange and black combinations we always have here. Orange, black, male, female, canine and feline - you choose. Frankly, no one will be disappointed if you discover the perfect companion in any of the many other colors we have. Just choosing to adopt from the deserving animals at the shelter will be cause for celebration.
CALENDAR of EVENTS
2016
JANUARY 
ADOPT a WORKOUT
PARTNER

FEBRUARY
ADOPT 'THE ONE'
 
MARCH
SPAY and NEUTER AWARENESS
 
APRIL
TRAP/NEUTER/RELEASE

MAY
Find your MISSING PET
 
JUNE  
FELINE FRENZY

WHISKERS & WINE 
Friday  the 17th
 
JULY 
ADOPT a SENIOR PET

AUGUST
$9 for 9 LIVES for 9 DAYS

SEPTEMBER 
ADOPT your MVP

BARK in the PARK
Saturday the 24th

OCTOBER  
ORANGE & BLACK
All Treats, no Tricks

NOVEMBER  
GIVING THANKS 
Animals and their people

DECEMBER  
Bring JOY to your WORLD
LINKS
the WASHINGTON POST


noted author PAM JOHNSON-BENNETT

PETFINDER  

PET WELLBEING  


ORANGE and BLACK: No such thing as too much
MAGGIE'S STORY: Part III
from Jim Birmingham
Jim Birmingham is a life-long animal lover, 
longstanding supporter of worthy animal causes, 
member of A-PAL, volunteer at ACAC&AC, 
Coonhound Guy, and Distinguished Old Gentleman.

Training wasn't the only challenge with Maggie. She found all of the weak spots in our fence early on and was able to get out multiple times. Patching the gaps with brush and new wire didn't hold her back; she continued to escape. We could hear Maggie happily baying throughout the wooded hills, on the scent! Even though she would return in two or three hours, this was dangerous for her, extremely unnerving for us, and we knew something more had to be done. We could have kept Maggie in a kennel but this would have been heartbreaking to any dog who loves to run. Besides, I didn't want to spend the rest of my life giving her multiple walks each day. So, although I wasn't sure any fence would hold her, we proceeded to add 700' of new wire mesh fencing, over 1/2 mile of heavy gauge wire, and two tubular swing gates to our current fence. This effort took most of the summer. By fall, it was time to turn her loose again.


Maggie probably could have easily jumped the fence, but she never acted like she would. Nor did she try to dig under it. She was a go-through-the-fence girl, and our fortified fence kept her contained. Maggie is no longer all that intent on getting out. Instead, she happily inspects her property several times daily. She enjoys checking every tree for squirrels, baying when one is spotted, and showing us continuously how she loves every square inch of her new territory. She digs trenches and deep foxholes throughout it, in pursuit of gophers-who, I hope, are mostly safe.

Maggie is forever a comedian and we can't go through a day, even a hard one, without laughing at her antics and the tricks she plays on all of us. She still loves tweaking the cats and likes it even better if they take a swat at her in the process. She jumps and bounces around them in circles. The more grossed-out they are; the better for Maggie.
My recently "adopted" stray cat, Jessie (another story), and I take a walk every morning and Maggie delights in coming out of nowhere,  firing past us like a rocket-propelled cannonball, and startling us--an understatement--every time. Afterwards, we throw sticks for her, which she delights in not bringing back.

It's been over a year and Maggie has come a long way. She serenades us daily with that beautiful baritone voice I really enjoy, although it is possible the neighbors do not. She's finally learned to sprawl on the porch and loves it, particularly when we accompany her. When we let her out first thing in the morning, instead of taking off on her inspection of the perimeter, she stares in the windows with that long, sad face only a Coonhound can make, until someone relents and joins her...pajamas, robe, slippers, and steaming coffee in hand. Rain or snow, it makes no difference to her. She's no longer content to "hunt" on her own--I have to come along.

At the end of the day, Maggie is worn out from all the fun, and loves for us to sit down quietly and hold her--all 60 pounds of her--to recall the day's activities. I often think about the Maggie of last year. Her story is still a work in progress. We may not be sure what the future holds, but we can say without reservation; she's our girl and so very special.

She's a shelter dog!

A special THANK YOU


Linda French, owner of the upcountry gift shop, Possibili-Teas, held a pajama party/auction event last month to benefit The Rusty Fund. It was a great success. The efforts of Linda and friends enabled The Rusty Fund to bank over $550. WOW! Our heartfelt thanks to you, Linda, for your exceptional generosity.


Don't be scared...


 
SPENCER: A matter of time


Spencer, a graduate of the 2016 kitten season, came to A-PAL from the shelter when it was discovered that he had a heart murmur. A medical exam confirmed the murmur, which made it too dangerous for Spencer to undergo the anesthesia needed for neutering. Heart murmurs, especially in young animals, have a tendency to resolve on their own, so A-PAL would foster Spencer until his condition could be checked again. While in foster care, he charmed everyone who met him. He leaped into laps, played with all who were willing and purred on contact.  After the necessary time had passed, A- PAL was thrilled to learn that his murmur had resolved and he was safely neutered. Spencer turned on that incandescent charm once more when a couple came to A-PAL's new facility intending to adopt a different cat. Instead, it was Spencer who captured their hearts. His new family has been in touch several times since to say how wonderful Spencer is for them. Good things happen when partners give a hapless kitten time to heal and find a loving home.


DO YOU HAVE A GREAT ADOPTION STORY FROM OUR SHELTER? 
We'd love to hear from you. Send your story, with photos if you have them, to Lisa Peterson.
petreher1@yahoo.com





Our GoFundMe site for The Rusty Fund reached a milestone in September. One generous donation got the fund to the halfway mark. The site will stay active through October so that we can continue toward our goal of $3,000. If you can make a donation (and none are too small), click the image above to be directed to the site and select "Donate Now". Many thanks to all who have donated to make this drive a success!




Help us build our BARN
PHASE 2 of the original building plan for ACAC & AC's new facility called for a barn. That part of the plan was set aside once PHASE 1 was completed, until a recent endowment from the estate of a local and generous animal benefactor got things moving again. Specifications for the new barn are being reviewed now, but more money will be needed to get it built. If you would like to help, you can make a tax-deductible donation to the Amador County Community Foundation, and specify in writing that it is for the Amador County Animal Control BARN. Donations can also be made online at the Amador Community Foundation website.

If you have questions, contact the Foundation at 209.223.2148.


Thinking of being a VOLUNTEER?
If you would like to join the dedicated ranks of volunteers at Amador County Animal Control & Adoption Center, you can view or print a Volunteer Application here , on the Amador County Website.  Final applications must be submitted on the county's original pink form, so you will need to pick up an original at Amador County Animal Control & Adoption Center, 12340 Airport Road, in Martell. They will walk you through the process.









Funny? Beautiful? Adorable?
If you have a great animal-related photo, 
we would love to share it. Send it to 
Sabeth Ireland , and we will post it here.


Interested in what's going on in the animal community?  Join our mailing list and get this newsletter every month.