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 June 11, 2020

OML UPDATE AT-A-GLANCE
 
Here are the top three things you need to know from this past week:
  • Since HB 481 has passed and is heading to the Governor for his signature, we remind our members that in order to receive your distribution of CARES Act coronavirus relief funding, municipalities must pass a resolution confirming compliance with the federal government guidelines for how the aid can be spent and must send the passed resolution to the county auditor and the Office of Budget and Management.. You can find a revised sample resolution HERE. Municipalities that have already passed the resolution refereeing to SB 310 do not need to pass a new resolution.
  • The Ohio EPA has announced that they will be terminating the March 31 order preventing municipalities from disconnecting water service for non-payment and ordering customers that were disconnected as of Jan. 1, 2020 to be reconnected without charge to the customer. The order will be terminated on July 10. You can read the letter announcing the order's termination HERE.
  • The League has rescheduled and reformatted our popular Council Training Seminar which is now scheduled for Wednesday June 24, 2020 from 9:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. and will be presented through an interactive webinar. To register, click HERE. The bi-annual training seminar provides important municipal information to members of council who may be newly elected or those that would appreciate continuing education opportunities on matters related to open meetings, contracting, Home Rule and local control issues, council powers and much more. If you have not registered, please do so as soon as possible materials will be sent to registrants in advance of the meeting.

 
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO RECEIVE CARES ACT FUNDS
 
This week, the SB 310 language distributing federal CARES Act coronavirus relief revenues to local governments was amended into HB 481 on the Senate floor and passed. The bill was then sent to the House, where it was concurred upon unanimously and is now being sent to the Governor for his signature, where it will become effective immediately due to the bill's emergency clause. You can read a joint press release the League released with other local government associations HERE.
 
The language amended into HB 481 appropriates and authorizes distribution of $350 million of federal CARES Act funding to Ohio communities for COVID-19 expenses. The distribution in HB 481 does not apply those local governments who received a direct payment from the Coronavirus Relief Fund (Fund 5CV1).
 
The League sponsored a webinar presented by Price Finley and Brooke Mangiarelli from the well-respected law firm Bricker and Eckler. The webinar detailed the eligible use of these CARE Act funds. As detailed in the webinar, payments from the Coronavirus Relief Fund can only be used to
finance costs that:
  • Are necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency with respect to COVID-19;
  • Were not accounted for in the budget most recently approved as of March 27, 2020 for the state or government; and
  • Were incurred during the period beginning March 1, 2020 and ending December 30, 2020
 
In the language, "necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency with respect to COVID-19" include:
  • Costs incurred to respond directly to the public health emergency, such as addressing medical or public health needs, or payroll costs for public health and public safety employees are presumed to be payments for services substantially dedicated to COVID-19
  • Costs incurred to respond to second-order effects of the public health emergency, such as providing support to address employment or business interruptions. The funds may not be used to replace revenue for expenditures that would not otherwise be eligible
  • Expenditure is reasonably necessary for its intended use in the reasonable judgment of the government officials responsible for spending Fund payments
 
The bill's requirement for costs "not accounted for in the budget most recently approved as of March 27, 2020 for the State or government" is met if either:
  • Cost cannot lawfully be funded using a line item, allotment, or allocation within the budget; or
  • Cost is for a substantially different use from any expected use of funds within such line item, allotment, or allocation.
 
The budget "most recently approved" means the relevant budget enacted for the relevant fiscal period, not including supplemental appropriations or other budget adjustments. A cost is not considered to have been accounted for merely because it could be met using budgetary stabilization, rainy day fund, or similar reserve account.
 
Eligible costs must have been incurred during the period beginning March 1, 2020 and ending December 30, 2020. The means the government has expended funds during the period March 1, 2020 to December 30, 2020 (i.e., must actually be spent - appropriated for use would not be sufficient).
 
Examples of eligible expenditures include:
 
  • Costs of providing COVID-19 testing;
  • Expenses of communication and enforcement of public health orders;
  • Expenses for disinfection of public areas and other facilities (e.g., nursing homes);
  • Expenses for PPE and sanitizing products for medical personnel, police officers, social workers, child protection services, etc. in connection with COVID-19;
  • Expenses for technical assistance to local authorities or other entities on mitigation of COVID-19 threats to public health and safety;
  • Payroll expenses for public safety, public health, health care, human services, etc., whose services are substantially dedicated to mitigating or responding to COVID-19;
  • Expenses to provide paid sick and family leave to public employees to enable compliance with COVID-19 public health precautions;
  • Expenses for emergency financial assistance to individuals and families directly impacted by loss of income due to COVID-19;
  • Expenditures related to grants to small businesses to reimburse costs of business interruption caused by required closures.
 
Examples of ineligible expenditures include:
 
  • Payroll or benefits expenses for employees whose work duties are not substantially dedicated to responding to COVID-19;
  • Expenses that have been or will be reimbursed under any federal program;
  • Severance pay;
  • Legal settlements;
  • Damages covered by insurance;
  • Expenses for the state share of Medicaid;
  • Reimbursement to donors for donated items or services;
  • Assistance for property tax requirements;
  • Workforce bonuses other than hazard pay or overtime paid to employees whose services are substantially dedicated to mitigating/responding to COVID-19.
 
Local governments are responsible for making determination as to what expenditures are necessary due to public health emergency and are not required to submit any proposed expenditures to Treasury. Fund payments are considered federal financial assistance for the purposes of the Single Audit Act. Fund payments also subject to federal regulations concerning
subrecipient monitoring and management.
 
The legislative authority of each county, municipal corporation, and township must first adopt legislation affirming that funds received may be spent only to cover costs consistent with CARES Act requirements. The is the sample resolution from the Office of Budget and Management, which you can find HERE. Funds will not be distributed from the Coronavirus Relief Fund until such legislation is adopted. Legislative authorities must also certify a copy of such legislation to the county auditor and Director of Budget and Management.
 
On the county level , each county auditor must create a new fund to be named the County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund. The Director of Budget and Management, in consultation with the Tax Commissioner, provides for payment from the Coronavirus Relief Fund to each County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund.
 
Within seven days of deposit in each County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund, county auditors must divide funds and distribute payments to counties, municipalities and townships. Upon making such distribution, county auditors must report the amount distributed to each subdivision to the Director of Budget and Management.
 
Amounts paid to each County generally follow the 2019 distribution of funds from the State Local Government Fund. Specific amounts determined using the following equation:
  • $350,000,000 x (County's 2019 Local Government Fund ("LGF") Allocation ÷ Sum of all 2019 LGF Allocations for Ohio counties)
 
The 2019 LGF Allocation is amount that would have been deposited into a county's County Undivided Local Government Fund in 2019 disregarding any reduction under ORC § 5747.502 and excluding any amounts deposited in that fund that were paid in that year to ineligible subdivisions or pursuant to ORC § 5747.503. You can find a spreadsheet for projected distribution to each county HERE.
 
As for municipalities , each local fiscal officer must establish a new fund to be named the Local Coronavirus Relief Fund. Within seven days of deposit in each County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund, county auditors must distribute payments to eligible municipal corporations and townships.
 
The State Auditor must audit each Local Coronavirus Relief Fund to determine whether payments have been expended in accordance with the language in HB 481 during the subdivision's next regular audit under ORC § 117.11.
 
Distribution details:
 
The amount distributed to each municipal corporation will be determined using the following equation:
  • (Amount available in County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund) x (Subdivision's 2019 CULGF Allocation ÷ Sum of 2019 CULGF allocations from that county's County Undivided Local Government Fund for all such subdivisions).
 
The 2019 CULGF Allocation is the amount of funds from a county's County Undivided Local Government Fund a subdivision would have received in 2019 under ORC §§ 5747.51 or 5747.53, disregarding any reduction under ORC § 5747.502 and any adjustment because the subdivision, pursuant to an ordinance or resolution, elected to forego all or a portion of its share of such funds.
 
No later than October 15, 2020, fiscal officer of each subdivision must pay the unencumbered balance of its Local Coronavirus Relief Fund to the county treasurer, who must deposit such revenue in the County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund.
 
On or before October 22, 2020, county treasurers must distribute funds in the County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund as follows:
  • 25% to the county;
  • An amount to each municipal corporation and township in that county, to
  • be calculated using the following equation:
    • (remaining balance in the County Coronavirus Relief Distribution Fund) x (population of the municipal corp. or township ÷ sum of populations of all eligible municipal corps. or townships in that county)
The payments are then deposited into Local Coronavirus Relief Fund.
 
No amount may be paid to a subdivision that is ineligible to receive payment, that had returned the unencumbered balance of its Local Coronavirus Relief Fund, or whose legislative authority did not adopt the necessary legislation.
 
No later than December 28, 2020, the fiscal officer of each subdivision must pay the balance of any funds remaining in the Local Coronavirus Relief Fund to the state treasury in manner prescribed by the Director of Budget and Management.
 
In addition to this information, you can find the latest FAQ from the U.S. Treasury on how the funds can be used HERE.
 
 
ADDITIONAL HB 481 AMENDMENTS OF MUNICIPAL IMPACT
 
There were other amendments from SB 310 that were added to HB 481 and approved by the House. Those amendments are the following:
 
  • As requested by Gov. DeWine, allows for a pay freeze for non-union state workers and grants authority for the auditor, treasurer, attorney general and secretary of state to seek the same freezes. This does not affect hazard pay related to COVID-19; 
  • Modifies Medicaid rates for nursing facilities. The amendment will result in costing $3.2 million in state funding and $27 million from federal funding;
  • Exempts the federal Paycheck Protection Program for businesses from the Commercial Activity Tax;
  • Allows local governments to furlough employees for 160 hours. In SB 310, the provision allowed employees to be furloughed for up to 480 hours. This language would only apply to FY21.
 
The Senate's $1.28 billion capital reappropriations plan, which was originally SB 316, was also amended in HB 481 on the Senate floor. You can find the full amendment language HERE. The bill was then passed by a vote of 30-2, with Sen. Fedor (D - Toledo) and Sen. Roegner (R - Hudson) as the two opposing votes. The bill was concurred upon by the House unanimously.
 
The League thanks the legislature for passing this important provision to ensure local governments get access to federal coronavirus relief aid as quickly as possible. We will keep our members apprised once the bill is signed by the Governor and becomes effective, and we will continue to make certain our municipalities have the information they need to get their distribution so they can continue delivering the quality local services Ohioans deserve.
 
 
 
HOUSE REPUBLICANS AND DEMOCRATS INTRODUCE LEGISLATIVE MEASURES ADDRESSING POLICE REFORM
 
As Ohio citizens speak out about issues that plague our society related to social injustice, race inequity and other social issues that divide too many communities, both parties in the Ohio House are unveiling legislative measures addressing challenges that impact all local governments.
 
HB 703, sponsored by Rep. Abrams (R - Cincinnati) and Rep. Plummer (R - Dayton), is a police-reform measure allocating more funding and training for law enforcement, instituting mandatory standards and psychological testing, and creating a disciplinary database for violent offenders. The legislation would place the Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) in charge of all police-involved death investigations and could mandate more supervision over law enforcement officers.
 
Under HB 703, all law enforcement agencies in the state would be required to follow the standards established by Gov. DeWine's Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board. These standards would cover issues such as body cameras, bias-free policing, community engagement and employee conduct. According to the bill's sponsors, only 65% of law enforcement agencies in Ohio follow these standards because there are currently no penalties for failing to abide by them. Additionally, the bill alters the disciplinary arbitration process by using state-hired arbitrators or common pleas court judges rather than civilians.
 
The bill's sponsors have stated that the intent behind the legislation is to "professionalize" law enforcement, not only by offering more training but also by increasing pay for officers.
 
House Democrats have announced several legislative proposals for a forthcoming police reform bill that include the banning of tear gas, mandating de-escalation training and creating independent investigations into officer misconduct reports.
 
While legislation has not yet been introduced, the proposal will most likely require annual bias training, ban the purchase of equipment and surplus military sold by the Department of Defense, create a central excessive use of force database and mandate that officers always wear visible identification.
 
The League will continue to keep our members apprised of all legislative efforts on police reform.
 
 
   
LEAGUE SURVEY ON ISSUES OF SOCIAL INJUSTICE IN LOCAL COMMUNITIES
 
This week, the League sent a brief survey to our members in an effort to gain a better understanding of the instances of social disturbances, public demonstrations and concerns for greater attention to be placed on issues related to social injustice that are impacting Ohio's cities and villages.
 
We want to thank all who have responded to the survey thus far. We ask all our members who have not yet completed the survey to take a few minutes and help provide us with this valuable information. Please click HERE to begin
   
 
UPDATES FROM GOV. DEWINE'S PRESS CONFERENCES
 
  • As of Friday afternoon, Ohio is reporting 40,424 cases of coronavirus, 2,508 deaths, 6,814 hospitalizations and 1,745 ICU admissions. 
  • Ohio Department of Health Director (ODH) Dr. Amy Acton has resigned as Director but will stay on as Chief Health Advisor to the Governor. Former ODH Director Lance Himes will serve as interim director.
Law Enforcement Updates:
 
  • Gov. DeWine is directing Ohio's Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board to begin developing uniform minimum standards related to mass protests. Members of the collaborative will examine issues surrounding best practices for interaction between law enforcement and crowds that fail to disperse, when tactics involving tear gas, pepper spray, and non-lethal projectiles are necessary and when these tactics should be considered excessive, and how to better protect members of the media from injury.
  • Ohio's Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board was formed in 2015 to create uniform minimum standards for Ohio's law enforcement agencies covering use of force, including deadly force, and hiring and recruitment. As of today, 79-percent of all of Ohio's law enforcement officers work for an agency that has voluntarily complied with these standards or is in the process of certification. Governor DeWine directed the Ohio Department of Public Safety's Office of Criminal Justice Services, which oversees the certification process, to reach out to every agency that is not certified in these standards and assist them in moving toward certification. The 2020 Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board report, which lists the certification status of all law enforcement agencies in the state, is available at . 
  • Gov. DeWine also announced that he will create a new Ohio Office of Law Enforcement Recruitment within Ohio's Office of Criminal Justice Services to encourage minorities and women to join the ranks of Ohio's enforcement officers, especially in urban communities. This, along with today's other announcements, are the first of several efforts to improve community-police relations in Ohio.
 
Testing Updates:
  • Ohio is expanding testing and Gov. DeWine is encouraging those who want a COVID-19 test, including those who are low-risk or asymptomatic, to talk with their health care provider or contact a testing location to arrange a test. A series of "pop-up" testing locations have also been announced, beginning with six locations in Columbus. These temporary testing sites will be available all over the state, including in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Portsmouth, Dayton, Xenia, Columbiana, Akron and other locations. You can find more information on Ohio's testing locations HERE. 
  • Beginning this week, the Minority Health Strike Force will kick-off a walk-up/drive-up testing initiative for roughly 25 sites with the assistance of the Ohio National Guard, the Ohio Association of Community Health Centers, as well as other health care and community-based organizations. 
  • During the month of June and in early July, this initiative has the capacity to test over 12,000 individuals statewide. Testing will be available for symptomatic and asymptomatic people. The test has no out-of-pocket cost to the patient and individuals of any age are able to access the test (minors need consent of a parent/guardian). 
  • In Franklin County, testing locations are in partnership with PrimaryOne and Heart of Ohio Community Health Centers. Those who show up to the site should bring their State I.D./Driver's License; and their insurance card if they have one. Appointments are not required but can be made. Tests are at no cost to the patient. The first 200 cars at each site will also get the added benefit of receiving a Community Wellness Kit that includes: face coverings; hand sanitizer and sanitizing spray.
  • The latest basic reproduction number or R0 (pronounced "R naught") for eight regions of Ohio have been released. The R0 represents the number of people, on average, that a person will spread a disease to. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that COVID-19's R0, without interventions, to be 2.5. With Ohio's interventions, the R0 for the state measured slightly lower than 1.0 on June 1. Ohio is beginning to see a slight increase in the R0 measurements, more so in certain parts of Ohio such as the Dayton region. You can find a map with more information HERE.
Business Updates:
  • JobsOhio announced that minority-owned Stark County businesses will participate in ELITE, London Stock Exchange Group's business support and development program. In collaboration with JobsOhio and the Stark County Minority Business Association, ELITE USA announced that 13 minority-owned businesses will make up its new cohort. JobsOhio will fund the one-year program, which includes expert consultation regarding strategy, innovation, operations, marketing, governance and risk management, talent management, and leadership. 
  • Lt. Gov. Husted announced that the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) will receive an $8.5 million federal Employment Recovery National Dislocated Worker Grant to help reemploy individuals who lost their jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and to help employers rebuild their workforces. ODJFS will work with the Governor's Office of Workforce Transformation to facilitate the grant program through local OhioMeansJobs centers and will distribute the funding to Ohio's local workforce areas. ODJFS will also provide outreach to employers and services to individuals who were laid off, either permanently or temporarily, as a result of the pandemic. 
  • For the week ending June 6, 2020, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) reported 35,430 initial jobless claims to the U.S. Department of Labor. Over the last 12 weeks, ODJFS has distributed more than $3.8 billion in unemployment compensation payments to more than 686,000 claimants. Of the more than 1 million applications the agency has received, nearly 94% have been processed, with about 6% pending.
PPE Distribution Updates
 
  • As of last week, Ohio has distributed over 30 million pieces of PPE.  Sources of these resources include donations, FEMA, JobsOhio purchases, and purchases by state agencies such as our Departments of Administrative Services, Health, and Public Safety using federal CARES Act funds. Of the 30 million total PPE pieces, 27.8 million pieces have been shipped to county EMAs for local distribution.
  • The Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) "Protecting Ohio's Workforce- We've Got You Covered" program has also sent over 1.5 million face coverings to employers to support and enhance any workforce safety and health efforts that businesses already have in place. Ohio is also providing PPE to the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, through their Office of Pharmacy Services, to support requests for PPE from state agencies, boards, and commissions.
  • Ohio is currently looking at long-term solutions to PPE supply chain issues plaguing the country. This includes longer-term contracts for ventilators and N95 masks. Ohio is also currently evaluating the results of a recently issued Invitation to Bid for gloves, gowns, and three-ply masks.
  • GOJO, an Akron-based manufacturer of hand sanitizer, and part of the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance, has been working with JobsOhio and today announced that it is expanding in Navarre and Maple Heights to meet the demand for their products that are helping fight COVID-19. The projects are expected to create 200 new jobs.
 
Reopening Updates:
 
  • Although Ohio never closed churches, synagogues, mosques, or other places of worship during this pandemic, we know that most of them stopped holding their traditional in-person services and found other ways to worship to protect their members and the communities where they serve. Gov. DeWine sent a letter to the ministerial community in Ohio, which you can read HERE, to update them on the status of COVID-19 and provide suggested best practices for resuming in-person services. You can find the Responsible RestartOhio guidance for religious services HERE. 
  • You can find the Responsible RestartOhio guidance for county and independent fairs HERE.
   
 
The House has recessed for the summer and has yet to release its schedule for the rest of the year. The Senate has a "if-needed" session days scheduled for day June 23 and 24 and has scheduled one session day a month through September.


.
MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION ON THE MOVE
 
Here are the bills that were passed out of the House and Senate this week:
 
  • HB 160 - LIQUOR LAWS. Sponsored by Rep. Ingram (D - Cincinnati), would revise certain provisions of the liquor control laws and declare an emergency. Before being passed unanimously by the full Senate, a substitute bill was adopted in the Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee that, among other changes, double the limit of designated outdoor refreshment areas (DORAS) that municipalities can create The League is supportive of the DORA provision.
 
  • HB 163 - WATER AND SEWER PRACTICES. Sponsored by Rep. Brinkman (R - Cincinnati), would create a process for withholding local government funds and state water and sewer assistance from municipal corporations that engage in certain water and sewer practices with respect to extraterritorial service. The bill passed the House by a vote of 56-38. This legislation is a preemption on the right of municipalities to charge what they deem a fair fee for the cost of building out and maintaining water and sewer infrastructure to neighboring subdivisions. The League is opposed to this legislation.
 
  • HB 674 - REVISES LIQUOR LAWS. Sponsored by Rep. Hillyer (R - Urichsville), would revise specified provisions of the liquor control law and declare an emergency. Before being passed by the full House by a vote of 75-16, the bill was amended in the House Commerce and Labor Committee to remove a provision regarding designated outdoor refreshment areas (DORAS) that were previously supported by the League. The bill was then amended on the House floor to remove the emergency clause. The League is now neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 13 - BROADBAND EXPANSION. Sponsored by Rep. Carfagna (R - Genoa Township) and Rep. O'Brien (D - Warren), would establish the residential broadband expansion program and make an appropriation. Before the bill was passed by the full House by a vote of 81-8, it was amended in the House Finance Committee to remove language exempting equipment used in internet services from the sales tax. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 425 - CONCEALED WEAPONS. Sponsored by Rep. Wiggam (R - Wooster), would modify the requirement that a concealed handgun licensee must notify a law enforcement officer that the licensee is authorized to carry a concealed handgun and is carrying a concealed handgun when stopped. The bill passed the full House by a vote of 58-32. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 450 - FISCAL OFFICERS. Sponsored by Rep. Stephens (R - ), would require fiscal officers of certain political subdivisions to provide certificates of transition to their successors when leaving office and modify language regarding the duty of a treasurer of a board of education to deliver to the treasurer's successor all papers related to the affairs of the district. The bill was passed out of the House unanimously. The League is supportive of this legislation.
 
  • SB 10 - THEFT IN OFFICE. Sponsored by Sen. Wilson (R - Maineville), would expand the penalties for theft in office based on the amount stolen and to include as restitution audit costs of the entity that suffered the loss. On the Senate floor, the bill was amended to include HB 272, which extends the state's ability to hold out-of-state companies or individuals accountable for harm caused to Ohioans. The bill was also amended to clarify HB 197 language regarding tolling. The bill was passed out of the House unanimously and now heads back to the Senate for concurrence. The League is supportive of this legislation.
 
 
 
 
 
COMMITTEE UPDATE: BILLS OF MUNICIPAL INTEREST
 
Here are the bills impacting municipalities that received committee hearings this week:
 
  • SB 311 - HEALTH ORDERS. Sponsored by Sen. McColley (R - Napoleon) and Rep. Roegner (R - Hudson), would rescind certain orders of the Director of Health regarding COVID-19, require the approval of the Joint Committee on Agency Rule Review for Department of Health orders to be effective for more than fourteen days, require statewide Department of Health orders to include the Governor's signature, modify the Department's rulemaking authority, to allow in-person high school graduation ceremonies, and declare an emergency. During its third hearing before the Senate Health Human Services and Medicaid Committee, no testimony was heard on this bill. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 621 - BUSINESS OPENINGS. Sponsored by Rep. Cross (R - Kenton) and Rep. Wilkin (R - Hillsboro), would enact The Business Fairness Act and declare an emergency. During its third hearing before the House State and Local Government Committee, the bill was amended to remove a requirement that in order to qualify to reopen businesses sell products from businesses that were allowed to remain open during a health emergency. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 218 - PUBLIC-PRIVATE AGREEMENTS. Sponsored by Rep. Patton (R - Strongsville), would authorize certain public entities to enter into public-private initiatives with a private party through a public-private agreement regarding public facilities. During its fourth hearing before the House State and Local Government Committee, the bill was amended to add clarifying language that ensured surety bonds adequately protect all parties. The League is supportive of this legislation.
 
  • HB 476 - EMINENT DOMAIN. Sponsored by former Rep. Manning and Rep. Hambley (R - Brunswick), would amend the law regarding eminent domain and declare an emergency. During its third hearing before the House State and Local Government Committee, the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association testified in opposition while the Ohio Soybean Association testified in support. The League is supportive of this legislation.
 
  • HB 444 - TOWNSHIP LAWS. Sponsored by Rep. Baldridge (R - Winchester) and Rep. Abrams (R - Harrison), would make various changes to township law. During its third hearing before the House State and Local Government Committee, a substitute bill was adopted that, among other changes, removed a requirement that municipalities and townships forming a special improvement district must be contiguous. The League is neutral on this legislation
 
  • HB 649 - HEALTH ORDERS. Sponsored by Rep. Stoltzfus (R - Minerva) and Rep. Hood (R - Ashville), is regarding the authority of the Department of Health and local boards of health to make certain orders and regarding the testing of individuals for certain communicable diseases. During its first hearing before the House State and Local Government Committee, the bill's sponsors explained that the Department of Health would be required to go before the General Assembly within five days to have any special orders approved, denied, limited or modified. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 618 - HEALTH ORDERS. Sponsored by Rep. Becker (R - Union Township), would limit the authority of the Governor and the Department of Health to issue orders regarding contagious or infectious diseases, prohibit any order from affecting the conduct of an election, to designate its provisions as the "Need Ohio Working (NOW) Act," and declare an emergency. During its first hearing before the House State and Local Government Committee, the bill's sponsor explained that it would require legislative approval for all Department of Health orders. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 601 - ADULT CHANGING STATIONS. Sponsored by Rep. Perales (R - Beavercreek), would enact Matthew's Law, requiring public buildings to have at least one rest room facility with an adult changing station and authorizing an income tax credit for installation. During its first hearing before the State and Local Government Committee, the bill's sponsor explained that the bill would require all new public buildings to contain at least one restroom that has an adult changing station for those with special needs or disabilities. The taxpayers that would be required by the legislation to install the families would be ale to claim a tax credit of up to $250. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • SB 293 - OPEN MEETINGS. Sponsored by Sen. Manning (R - N. Ridgeville) and Sen. Blessing (R - Cincinnati), would create a procedure within the Court of Claims to hear complaints alleging a violation of the Open Meetings Law. During its fourth hearing before the Senate General Government and Agency Review Committee, the bill was amended to allow the Court of Claims to send cases back to other courts and changes the requirements for how clerks of courts serve companies on public bodies. The League is neutral on this legislation.
 
  • HB 631 - ECONOMIC ALLIANCES. Sponsored by Rep. Rogers (R - Mentor-on-the-Lake) and Rep. Hambley (R - Brunswick), would authorize municipal corporations to establish regional economic development alliances for the sharing of services or resources among alliance members. During its first hearing before the House Economic and Workforce Development Committee, the bill's sponsors said the bill would create a pilot program initially for communities in Cuyahoga and Summit counties, The program is designed to increase regional cooperation in the state by creating additional tools for municipalities in order to help them coordinate and collaborate in seeking cost efficiencies. The League is supportive of this legislation. (Link: https://bit.ly/30yjnqZ)
 
  • HB 264 - INFRASTRUCTURE LOANS. Sponsored by Rep. Wilkin (R - Hillsboro) and Rep. O'Brien (R - Warren), would allow the Ohio Water Development Authority to provide for the refinancing of loans for certain public water and waste water infrastructure projects. During its third hearing before the Senate Energy and Public Utilities Committee, no testimony was heard on this bill. The League is supportive of this legislation. (Link: https://bit.ly/2C5997n)


THERE ARE CURRENTLY NO BILLS SCHEDULED FOR COMMITTEE
Ohio Municipal League Meetings & Trainings

2020 COUNCIL TRAINING WEBINARS ~ JUNE 24, 2020

OML/OMAA Webinar

June 18, 2020 11:00 am ~ 12:00 pm
"Public Records - Changes & Trends in 2020 "


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