Presidents' Day New Releases with a Giveaway!
This week's newsletter brings plenty of new Presidents' Day-themed reading - an exploration of the relationship between Benjamin Franklin and George Washington, a look at the writing of past presidents, the newest release from New York Times bestselling author and cohost of Pod Save America, Dan Pfeiffer about fixing American politics, a hopeful glimpse into a bright new generation of political leaders, and what America might look like when they are in charge, and an in-depth portrait of the final years of America's first president.

For further presidential learning, visit some of our digital library resources such as our Presidential Collection on Overdrive, World Book Online, or log in to afpls.org to access more resources in GALILEO!
Theirs was a three-decade-long bond that, more than any other pairing, would forge the United States. Vastly different men, Benjamin Franklin —an abolitionist freethinker from the urban north—and George Washington —a slavehold­ing general from the agrarian south—were the indispensable authors of American independence and the two key partners in the attempt to craft a more perfect union at the Constitutional Convention , held in Franklin's Philadelphia and presided over by Washington. And yet their teamwork has been little remarked upon in the centuries since.

Illuminating Franklin and Washington's relationship with striking new detail and energy, Pulitzer Prize –winning historian Edward J. Larson shows that theirs was truly an intimate working friendship that amplified the talents of each for collective advancement of the American project.

Franklin and Washington —the two most revered figures in the early republic—staked their lives and fortunes on the American experiment in liberty and were committed to its preservation. Today the United States is the world's great super­power, and yet we also wrestle with the government Franklin and Washington created more than two centuries ago—the power of the executive branch, the principle of checks and balances, the electoral college—as well as the wounds of their compromise over slavery. Now, as the founding institutions appear under new stress, it is time to understand their origins through the fresh lens of Larson's Franklin & Washington , a major addition to the literature of the founding era.

Most Americans are familiar with Abraham Lincoln 's famous words in the Gettysburg Address and the Eman­cipation Proclamation . Yet few can name the work that helped him win the presidency: his published collection of speeches entitled  Political Debates between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas . Lincoln labored in secret to get his book ready for the 1860 election, tracking down newspaper transcripts, editing them carefully for fairness, and hunting for a printer who would meet his specifications.  Political Debates  sold fifty thousand copies—the rough equivalent of half a million books in today's market—and it reveals something about Lincoln's presidential ambitions. But it also reveals something about his heart and mind. When voters asked about his beliefs, Lincoln liked to point them to his book.

In Craig Fehrman's groundbreaking work of history,  Author in Chief , the story of America's presidents and their books opens a rich new window into presidential biography. From volumes lost to history—Calvin Coolidge's  Autobiography , which was one of the most widely discussed titles of 1929—to ones we know and love—Barack Obama's  Dreams from My Father , which was very nearly never published—Fehrman unearths countless insights about the presidents through their literary works.

Presidential books have made an enormous impact on American history, catapulting their authors to the national stage and even turning key elections. Beginning with Thomas Jefferson 's  Notes on the State of Virginia , the first presidential book to influence a campaign, and John Adams 's  Autobiography , the first score-settling presiden­tial memoir,  Author in Chief   draws on newly uncovered information—including never-before-published letters from Andrew Jackson , John F. Kennedy , and Ronald Reagan —to cast fresh light on the private drives and self-doubts that fueled our nation's leaders.

Combining the narrative felicity of a journalist with the rigorous scholarship of a historian, Fehrman delivers a feast for history lovers, book lovers, and everybody curious about a behind-the-scenes look at our presidents.

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Yes We (Still) Can and cohost of Pod Save America , a sharp political playbook for how Democrats can take on Trump , McConnell , Fox News, and the rest of the right-wing circus dominating American politics.
There is nothing more important than beating Donald Trump in 2020, but defeating Trump is just the start of this timely book. Un-Trumping America offers readers three critical insights: first, Trump is not an aberration, but rather the logical extension of the modern Republican Party; second, how Democrats can defeat Trump in 2020; and third, preventing the likes of Trump from ever happening again with a plan to fix democracy.

While the catalog of the president's crimes is long and growing, undoing Trumpism — the political platform of racism, authoritarianism, and plutocracy that gave rise to Trump and defines the Republican Party — is a long and continuing fight. Through a craven, cynical strategy engineered by Mitch McConnell , funded by the Kochs , and fueled by Fox News propaganda , Republicans have rigged American politics to drown out the voices of the people in favor of the powerful. Without an aggressive response that recognizes who the Republicans are and what they have done, American democracy as we know it won't survive this moment and a conservative, shrinking, mostly white minority will govern the country for decades.

Un-Trumping America dismantles toxic Trumpism and offers a way forward. Dan Pfeiffer worked for nearly twenty years at the center of Democratic politics, from the campaign trail to Capitol Hill to Barack Obama 's White House. But it was Trump's victory and Republicans' incessant aiding and abetting of Trumpism that has radicalized his thinking. Here, Pfeiffer urges Democrats to embrace bold solutions — from fixing the courts to abolishing the electoral college to eliminating the filibuster — in order to make America more democratic (and Democratic).

A new generation is stepping up. There are now twenty-six millennials in Congress—a fivefold increase gained in the 2018 midterms alone. They are governing Midwestern cities and college towns, running for city councils, and serving in state legislatures. They are acting urgently on climate change (because they are going to live it); they care deeply about student debt (because they have it); they are utilizing big tech but still want to regulate it (because they understand how it works). In  The Ones We've Been Waiting For , TIME correspondent Charlotte Alter defines the class of young leaders who are remaking the nation—how grappling with 9/11 as teens, serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, occupying Wall Street and protesting with Black Lives Matter , and shouldering their way into a financially rigged political system has shaped the people who will govern the future.

Through the experiences of millennial leaders—from progressive firebrand Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg to Republican up-and-comer Elise Stefanik—Charlotte Alter gives the big-picture look at how this generation governs differently than their elders, and how they may drag us out of our current political despair. Millennials have already revolutionized technology, commerce, and media and have powered the major social movements of our time. Now government is ripe for disruption.  The Ones We've Been Waiting For  is a hopeful glimpse into a bright new generation of political leaders, and what America might look like when they are in charge.

Popular historian and former White House speechwriter Jonathan Horn tells the astonishing true story of George Washington's forgotten last years—the personalities, plotting, and private torment that unraveled America's first post-presidency.
Washington's End   begins where most biographies of George Washington leave off, with the first president exiting office after eight years and entering what would become the most bewildering stage of his life. Embittered by partisan criticism and eager to return to his farm, Washington assumed a role for which there was no precedent at a time when the kings across the ocean yielded their crowns only upon losing their heads. In a different sense, Washington would lose his head, too.

In this riveting read, bestselling author Jonathan Horn reveals that the quest to surrender power proved more difficult than Washington imagined and brought his life to an end he never expected. The statesman who had staked his legacy on withdrawing from public life would feud with his successors and find himself drawn back into military command. The patriarch who had dedicated his life to uniting his country would leave his name to a new capital city destined to become synonymous with political divisions.

A vivid story, immaculately researched and powerfully told through the eyes not only of Washington but also of his family members, friends, and foes,  Washington's End  fills a crucial gap in our nation's history and will forever change the way we view the name Washington.

Natasha Pulley's  Watchmaker of Filigree Street  captivated readers with its charming blend of historical fiction, fantasy, and steampunk. Now, Pulley revisits her beloved characters in a sequel that sweeps readers off to Japan in the 1880s, where nationalism is on the rise and ghosts roam the streets.

1888. Five years after they met in  The Watchmaker of Filigree Street , Thaniel Steepleton, an unassuming translator, and Keita Mori, the watchmaker who remembers the future, are traveling to Japan. Thaniel has received an unexpected posting to the British legation in Tokyo, and Mori has business that is taking him to Yokohama.

Thaniel's brief is odd: the legation staff have been seeing ghosts, and Thaniel's first task is to find out what's really going on. But while staying with Mori, he starts to experience ghostly happenings himself. For reasons Mori won't—or can't—share, he is frightened. Then he vanishes.

Meanwhile, something strange is happening in a frozen labor camp in Northern Japan. Takiko Pepperharrow , an old friend of Mori's, must investigate.
As the weather turns bizarrely electrical and ghosts haunt the country from Tokyo to Aokigahara forest, Thaniel grows convinced that it all has something to do with Mori's disappearance—and that Mori may be in serious danger.

This book isn't available for sale or as a library book yet, but you can win a print galley (a paperback used to promote the book before official release) of this title by emailing us within 24 hours of the New Books Newsletter email. Just put "Pepperharrow" in the subject line of your email to Collection.Development@fultoncountyga.gov.
We'll pick a winner at random from messages received between 8:30am Tuesday, 2/11/2020 and 8:30am Wednesday, 2/12/2020.

The winner will be notified via email and must be able to pick the book up at an AFPLS branch within one month. Just in case you aren't chosen, why not click here to reserve a copy with Fulton County Libraries? We'll be pleased to offer this title to all our readers on its release date.
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