RESEARCH WEEKLY: A Year of Living with the COVID-19 Pandemic 

By Elizabeth Sinclair Hancq

Exactly one year ago this week, I published the first of what would turn out to be many Research Weekly blogs on COVID-19 and severe mental illness.  

In the blog titled “A special edition in this time of uncertainty,” I wrote about how the challenge of maintaining normalcy while worrying about the crisis ahead is not new to many family members who have loved ones with severe mental illness. I went on to discuss the various factors that make people with severe mental illness more likely to experience the negative effects of COVID-19, including high smoking rates and physical health comorbidities that put individuals more at risk for severe illness from COVID-19 and the disproportionate rates of homelessness resulting in many having no home to ‘hunker down in.’  

While we have had many positive breakthroughs in the past year, such as the development of an effective COVID-19 vaccine, we have also experienced enormous suffering with more than half of a million lives lost and the furthering of social, racial and economic disparities. And while there is much to look forward to as we begin to combat the virus, there are still many challenging days ahead.  

In recognition of all that has happened in the past year, below is a list of all the Research Weekly blogs the Office of Research and Public Affairs has written about COVID-19 and severe mental illness.  

Elizabeth Sinclair Hancq is the director of research at the Treatment Advocacy Center.

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Questions? Contact us at orpa@treatmentadvocacycenter.org 

Research Weekly is a summary published as a public service of the Treatment Advocacy Center and does not necessarily reflect the findings or positions of the organization or its staff. Full access to research summarized may require a fee or paid subscription to the publications.  

The Treatment Advocacy Center does not solicit or accept funds from pharmaceutical companies.