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January 2015 Newsletter

 

New Study: Let's Talk About Partnerships


We're continuing to look at nonprofit-company partnerships and the powerful role they play in maximizing volunteer impact. In 2014, Reimagining Service conducted a nonprofit-company partnerships survey of more than 80 nonprofit leaders to investigate how their organizations partner with companies to recruit and organize volunteers, the nature of those partnerships and their value. Here is a brief look at some of the major findings:

 

  • Goals and Outcomes - An overwhelming majority (71%) of respondents, either agreed or strongly agreed to this statement: "When establishing a partnership, my nonprofit and the company partner have a clear, open conversation about goals and outcomes."  We're pleased to see that this aspect of partnership development is taking place.
  • Financial Support - Thirty-seven percent of respondents answered yes to having committed to a partnership even when the project didn't meet their organizational needs. Eighty-one percent of those respondents agreed that they committed to an un-strategic partnership because they hoped the company would make a financial donation in the future. Clearly, the data tells us that the influence of money on the overall partnership and decisions related to specific projects is complicated.

 

Learn more about the findings by accessing our comprehensive PowerPoint deck or a two-page summary.

 

New Resource: 2014 Update: 12 Key Actions of Volunteer Program Champions, CEOs Who Lead the Way   

 

A core belief of Reimagining Service is the importance of executive leadership in developing, sustaining, and growing volunteer engagement in their organizations. We wanted to delve deeper into this topic by revisiting Betty Stallings' 2005 work,  12 Key Actions of Volunteer Program Champions: CEOs Who Lead the Way, which outlined consistent themes amongst leaders who recognize the value and embrace volunteers as a critical strategy in meeting the mission of their organizations. With Stallings' support, we used her work as a starting point to see if these actions have changed in the past decade, and surveyed leaders throughout the country to better understand their attitudes and approaches to volunteer engagement.  

 

What we found was interesting and insightful and an updated version of the report is now available. In many instances, the key actions ring just as true as they did 10 years ago. In some cases, changes in organizational practices (such as strategic planning) or other trends in the field have led to the evolution of understanding how the actions come to life in everyday settings. However, what remains consistent is the need for executive level buy-in and support of volunteer engagement.

 

 
Blog Post: The Importance of Executive Leadership
      

Read a blog post by Betty Stallings, a member of the Reimagining Service Council and author of the 12 Key Actions of Volunteer Program Champions: CEOs Who Lead the Way (2005), who shares her observations and experiences in the field over the past ten years as she prepared a foreword for the updated report.     

      
"In the past 10 years, it has become increasingly evident that funders needed to understand the components of excellent volunteer engagement and the impact on missions when carried out well. Although it is a slow moving trend, I have had the privilege of joining with foundations such as the Leighty Family Foundation and have seen the power that funders hold in setting expectations, and rewards, for organizations endeavoring to reinvent their volunteer engagement to greatly enhance mission endeavors. CEOs listen to funders!" Read more  

 

 

Webinar on Volunteer Engagement in the Public Sector       


On January 15, 10 AM PST/1 PM EST, we're offering a webinar, in partnership with America's Service Commissions (ASC), on effective volunteer engagement in the public sector. The presenters will dive into more detail about our newly-released study and provide time for questions and answers. Register today.

 

 

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