Editor's Note
This study reviews how nootropic herbs, including  Bacopa monnieri (bacopa), Centella asiatica (gotu kola), Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo), Acorus calamus (sweetflag), and herbs from the Lamiaceae (mint) family with a focus on  Rosmarinus officinalis  (rosemary) and various species of  Salvia  (sage), can help those with attention-deficient/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The authors note that even if these herbs are not as potent as amphetamines, they are clearly safer and have a definite role in a holistic treatment protocol for ADHD. Ideally one of the better-studied nootropics would be combined with one of the Lamiaceae family nootropics and other less well-confirmed nootropics to create an individualized formula for each ADHD patient, according to the study.
Abstract

Nootropic herbs can be very helpful in people with attention-deficient/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Two herbs both called brahmi in the Ayurvedic tradition,  Bacopa monnieri  (bacopa) and  Centella asiatica  (gotu kola), as well as formulas featuring these herbs, are discussed in great depth for this purpose. Additional general nootropic herbs discussed are  Ginkgo biloba  (ginkgo) and  Acorus calamus  (sweetflag), including both American and Eurasian varieties. Nootropic herbs from the Lamiaceae (mint) family with a focus on  Rosmarinus officinalis  (rosemary) and various species of  Salvia  (sage) are also reviewed. The general failure of nervine herbs such as  Hypericum perforatum  (St. John's wort) and  Valeriana officinalis  (valerian) for ADHD is highlighted, giving further impetus for the need to focus on nootropic herbs instead. The safety and clinical use of all relevant herbs is highlighted.

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