Jewish Community Center of Long Beach Island E-Letter



December 11, 2020
25 Kislev 5781



EACH MORNING OF CHANUKAH YOU WILL BE RECEIVING AN EMAIL WITH THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE EVENING'S ACTIVITIES ALONG WITH RECIPES, CRAFTS AND CARTOONS.
A HANUKAH MESSAGE FROM
RABBI JAY

An interesting thought occurred to me as I was contemplating the Hanukkah story this week. In reality, the actual miracle of the oil is pretty small. I don’t mean that it did not have impact. I simply mean that in terms of “spectacle”, well, there wasn’t much there. One cruse of oil, one flame, one flickering light.

For comparison’s sake, let’s take a look at some earlier miracles in the Torah.
The miracle of creation was huge. It was big enough to create a universe. By any definition, that is big. That was a phenomenon.

In the flood story, by means of a great deluge, God destroys the entire earth and its inhabitants (save for Noah and his family). That was an event.

Fast forward to the miracle of the redemption of the Israelites from Egypt. For that episode God provided 10 Plagues that impacted all of Egypt. As a final act, God split the Red Sea allowing almost a million people to walk between two walls of water and then, for good measure, God caused those same walls of water to crash down on the entire Egyptian army. That happening was so big that Hollywood has produced myriad movies about it.

A few months later an entire mountain shook and thundered when God gave the Torah to our ancestors. Later the earth literally opened and swallowed Korach and his fellow rebels. These were surely spectacles to behold.

Now fast forward some 1000+ years to the miracle of Hanukkah. What is it? A single menorah stays lit for 8 days when it should have lasted 1 day. And what’s more, how many people were around to see it? A few of Maccabee warriors and, maybe, the High priest? That, my friends, was not a spectacle. In fact, it was so small in scale that one might have needed spectacles to see it. Is there a lesson to be learned here?

God seems to have intentionally toned down the miracle business. Maybe God determined that the big miracles cost too much in terms of expense and life.

Despite the Hanukkah miracle’s diminutive size, one cannot deny the huge impact of the Hanukkah event. Since that date, millions and millions of Jews have relived the miracle by lighting menorahs on each of the 8 nights of Hanukkah. (I have calculated how many candles one family would have used if they observed the custom of lighting the menorah every night of Hannukah beginning in 567 BCE until the end of the holiday this year. Let’s see if you come up with the same number.)

The truth is that the Hanukkah miracle required someone to really be paying attention in order for it to be noticed. And I think that is the lesson. Ultimately, God came to the conclusion that we should not need thunder and lightning and seas splitting and mountains shaking in order to see a miracle. God wants us to look for, and find, the miracles.

Miracles happen all of the time and go unnoticed. Too often we are waiting for the big event in order to see the miracle. However, if we are paying attention, we will see them, no matter how small.

This is why the mitzvah is to look at the candles on the menorah. Our tradition is telling us that miracles abound, we just need to look for them. There is magic in the flickering light, magic in focusing our attention, and magic in recognizing, on our own, each and every miracle with which we are blessed.

There is blessing in the smallest light, blessing in the slightest breath, blessing in the faintest sound.

Chag Urim Sameach – Rabbi Michael S. Jay
Happy Hanukkah Everyone;

Hanukkah 5781, begins on December 10, 2020. I hope that you and your loved ones enjoy the festival of lights this year. I know that can be difficult with all that has happened this year, but for the sake of our children and grandchildren we all should try. We all know the story of Hanukkah, It starts on the 25th day of Kislev, and it commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 BC. After the defeat of the Seleucid Empire, by Judah Maccabee and his brothers, we discover that the Temple had been ransacked. Judah ordered the Temple cleansed and a new alter built in place of the polluted one and new holy vessels to be made. The Menorah in the refurbished Temple needed pure olive oil with the seal of the Kohen Gadol to keep the Menorah lit. They found only one flask that would keep the it lit for one day the oil lasted eight days, the time needed to prepare a fresh supply of kosher oil.

We all know the story of the festival of lights, but for me, this holiday takes on a new meaning, this year. The Maccabees; Judah, Johanan, Simon, Eliezer, and Jonathan, are replaced by new heroic hammers; Pfizer, Moderna, Astra Zeneca, Gilead, J&J, Novavax and Glaxo Smith Kline. The Seleucid Empire is replaced by Covid 19. This new despot has devastated families, caused unspeakable hardship, and forced us to abandon worshiping at the JCC. Instead of the oil lasting eight days, let us hope the vaccine works for everyone, and will be able to keep the world safe. Once the pandemic is over, we like our ancestors the Maccabees will clean our synagogue and prepare it for our return.

Like our ancestors we will celebrate our coming together again for prayer and performances, faith and friendship, and services and socialization. Unlike our ancestors we will not have to wait 7 years to receive our liberation, but with God’s help and guidance, let it happen quickly. So when you begin lighting the candles of your menorah let us all remember our past and to our future.

On behalf of Irene, Boots and myself we wish you all a Happy Hanukkah, and a safe and happy New Year. We are looking forward to having our reopening celebration with all of you.

Mike     
.CHANUKAH-HANNUKAH-CHANUKA-HANUKAH-CHANUKKAH

FIRST CANDLE THURSDAY EVENING 12/10


JOIN THE JCC ZOOM EACH NIGHT FOR A SPECIAL ACTIVITY


THURSDAY 12/10
7:30 PM
Let us light our Chanukiahs together and sing Chanukah songs

FRIDAY 12/11
6:00 PM
VIRTUAL SHABBAT DINNER
For reservations and table requests contact Irene. Click here for the EMAIL

SATURDAY 12/12
6:00 Havdallah
6:30 PM Movie
Gather the kids and grandkids around to watch on Zoom
"A Rugrats Chanukah"

Latkes
SUNDAY 12/13
6:00 PM
Making Latkes with Rabbi Jay
Join Rabbi in the kitchen and make latkes together

HERE IS THE RECIPE
4 large potatoes (Russet or Yukon Gold works best)
1 medium/large onion
lemon juice
2 eggs
2 tablespoons of matzah meal or flour
salt
pepper
oil for frying
 
Peel potatoes and finely grate them together with the onions in a food processor.  Sprinkle with lemon juice.  Empty the grated potato/onion mixture onto a large piece of cheesecloth and squeeze out liquid into a bowl.  Let the liquid sit for a while and then pour off the liquid. On the bottom of the bowl will be a "starchy" sediment.  Place the grated potato/onion mixture into a large bowl together with the eggs, flour and the starchy sediment from the bowl. Combine well and add salt and pepper.
 
Fry in hot oil (nonstick skillet or cast iron pot is best) by dropping full tablespoons of the potato mixture into the oil.  Flatten mixture and fry in batches over medium-high heat.  The latkes should be golden brown on both sides.  Place cooked latkes on paper towel to drain oil.  To keep warm or reheat, place on a cookie sheet and place in 300 degree oven.  
 
Serve with applesauce or sour cream and enjoy.

MONDAY 12/14
8:00 PM
The Great Latkes vs Hamantashen Debate
The Latkes–Hamantashen Debate is a deliberately humorous academic debate about the relative merits and meanings of these two items of Jewish cuisine. The debate originated at the University of Chicago in 1946 and has since been held annually.

The JCC of LBI will be holding its own GREAT SYNAGOUE DEBATE
Following a joint communal lighting of the menorah with
Congregation B'nai Tikvah, New Brunswick,
the two spirtual leaders
Rabbi Jay and Rabbi Robert Wolkoff
will be debating the merits of Latkes and Hamantashen.
Mitch Frumkin will be our moderator.



TUESDAY 12/15
7:30 PM
Let's Play Dreydel


WEDNESDAY 12/16
7:30 PM
Why do we Eat cheese on Chanukah?
We will be answering that question as we
learn the story of the often forgotten Chanukah heroine Judith.

THURSDAY 12/17
7:30 PM
Ocean County Jewish Federation's
Community of Caring Heroes
honoring community leaders, and lighting candles for the last night of Chanukah
Our own Dr. Max Scheer and Lenore Forested will be honored.

NEXT WEEK'S SCHEDULE

FRIDAY 12/11 @ 6:00 AM
Kabbalat Shabbat & Dinner

SATURDAY 12/12
Torah Study 9:00 AM
Services at 10:00 AM

SUNDAY 12/13 11:00 AM
"The Jokes on Us" with
Joel Chasnof. See link below to sign up.

MONDAY 12/14 @ 10:00 AM
Chumash Class (Family Dynamics) with Rabbi Jay

TUESDAY 12/15 @ 8:00 PM
Rabbi's Class at the Jersey Shore Jewish Virtual University (see article below on Virtual University to register)

WEDNESDAY 12/16 4:00 PM
WAX Book Club with Maggie
Anton

THURSDAY 12/10 @ 11:00 AM
Torah Study with the Rabbi
2:00 PM Beginning Hebrew with Ira

HERE ARE THE LINKS FOR THE ACTIVITIES FOR THIS WEEK

Candle Lighting Time
Friday evening,
December 11, 2020
4:16 PM
(So. Ocean County NJ)

JOIN US FOR SERVICES
ON ZOOM

Friday evening
December 11, 2020
6:00 PM
VIRTUAL DINNER & SERVICES
Here is 
your invitation from 
Rabbi Jay to
Join Zoom Services

Saturday morning
December 12, 2020
Torah Study
9:00 AM
Services
10:00 AM
Here is 
your invitation from 
Rabbi Jay to
Join Zoom Services

Torah Portion
Parashat Vayeshev
Genesis 37:1-40:23
Here is the Parshah

Aaron Lombardi will be reading Torah this Shabbat.

Haftorah
Zechariah 2:14-4:7
Here is the Haftorah:

Havdallah
Saturday
December 12, 2020
6:00 PM

Sunday - Thursday
Ma'ariv Service
7:30 PM
Here is 
your invitation from 
Rabbi Jay to
Join Zoom Services:

Sunday - Friday
Shacharit Service
8:15 AM
Here is 
your invitation from 
Rabbi Jay to
Join Zoom Services:
JCC WOMENS AUXILIARY: BOOK GROUP DISCUSSION
         THE 3RD WEDNESDAY, AT 4:00 PM
CONTINUES....

Rashi's Daughters (a 3 book series) by Maggie Anton (Author)

The second novel in a dramatic trilogy set in eleventh-century France about the lives and loves of three daughters of the great Talmud scholar
Rashi’s middle daughter, Miriam, is determined to bring new life safely into the Troyes Jewish community and becomes a midwife. As devoted as she is to her chosen path, she cannot foresee the ways in which she will be tested and how heavily she will need to rely on her faith. With Rashi's Daughters, author Maggie Anton brings the Talmud and eleventh-century France to vivid life and poignantly captures the struggles and triumphs of strong Jewish women.
Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 4:00 PM
The dramatic final book in the epic historical trilogy about the lives and loves of the three daughters of the great Talmud scholar Rashi
Rachel is the youngest and most beautiful daughter of medieval Jewish scholar Salomon ben Isaac, or "Rashi." Her father's favorite and adored by her new husband, Eliezer, Rachel's life looks to be one of peaceful scholarship, laughter, and love. But events beyond her control will soon threaten everything she holds dear. Marauders of the First Crusade massacre nearly the entire Jewish population of Germany, and her beloved father suffers a stroke. Eliezer wants their family to move to the safety of Spain, but Rachel is determined to stay in France and help her family save the Troyes yeshiva, the only remnant of the great centers of Jewish learning in Europe.


ORDER YOUR BOOK NOW AND START READING TODAY!
Click here to purchase all 3 books in the series on Amazon. Click here to go to the Ocean County Library. A zoom link will be sent shortly before the event.
RSVP to Debby Schweighardt, Book Group Coordinator at: dschweig19@gmail.com
THIS WEEK'S YAHRZEITS

The following names will be read at Friday night services.

Ralph Celebre
Saul Hurwitz
Leanore S. Klein*
Jerome Odenheimer*
Stella Pervin*
Temi Saivetz
Philip Schleifer
Samuel Tucker
Rachel Cherins
Herman Glassman*
Sol Grossman
Joseph Bumenthal*
Arnold Schwartz
Marcia Yankowitz
Shari Zalkind*
Stanley Antonoff
Carl M. Cole
Nathan Shapiro
Harvey Sherman
Joseph Valentine*
Seymour Abend
Sylvia Applebaum
Inge Batoff
Michael Kaplan
Lorraine Liebowitz
Jacqueline Mogil
Joseph Nakkab
Reba Papier
Sidney Fisch
Mark Goldman
Irving Butler
Mendel Fischer
Henry Gondelman
Ruth Moss
Dan Renzin
Ethel Snyder*
 
In this Zoom era, we have been able to have a daily minyan at 8:15 AM and at 7:30 PM and on Shabbat. We encourage you to join us on the day of your loved one’s yahrzeit. In the morning, the service is about ½ hour beginning at 8:15 and in the evening at 7:30 until about 7:45. Rabbi will be glad to say the traditional El Malei Rachamim prayer for you, which is recited during the funeral, going up to the grave of the departed, Yizkor remembrance day and other occasions on which the memory of the dead is recalled. You are also welcome to share with the minyan some special memories of your loved one. 
29 KISLEV
is the yahrzeit for
Joe Valentine. Join Rose & Rudy for minyan on Tuesday morning, December 15 at 8:15 AM.
Arthur Davis
December 13
Marlene Herman
December 14
Ruth Hochberger
December 15
Philip Rosenzweig
December 16
Stanley Spitzer
December 16

Cake
SHARE YOUR NEWS
AND PICTURES

CONTACT: rvalen1963@aol.com
 
  
CARING COMMITTEE
  This committee acts as a support system for congregation members facing illness and other personal situations that need to be addressed.
Please contact Chairperson,
Debby Schweighardt
if you are in need of assistance or if you know of a JCC member
that needs our help.
973-634-5349 
COFFEE, DESSERT AND COMRADERIE

WAX GET-TOGETHER
7:45 PM
TUESDAY DECEMBER 22nd

GIVING OPPORTUNITIES

PAVERS
Inscribe a paver at the front entrance to the building
8" X 4", 8" X 8" and 12" X 12"

SEE UPDATED ORDER FORM:
Become a permanent part of the JCC landscape.
Purchase a personalized paving stone
in honor of your family or in memory of a loved one.

Please contact Diane Hoffman
with your order or with any questions:


PRAYER BOOKS
There are still High Holiday Prayer Books and Chumashim available to be purchased in memory or honor of someone or something. The cost of a Prayer Book is $72 each and $120 for an Eitz Hayim Chumash. The donation includes an affirmation sticker in the book and an acknowledgement letter or letters.
See Order form here: Prayer Book


TRIBUTES
SEND ONE OF OUR TRIBUTES IN HONOR OR IN MEMORY OF
See order form here: TRIBUTES


TREE OF LIFE
Add a leaf (leaves) to our beautiful Tree of Life located in the Social Hall. See the order form here: TREE OF LIFE
Bronze Leaf $90
Silver Leaf $126
Gold :Leaf $180


ENDOWMENT FUND
Join Herb and Selma Shapiro z"l to help assure the continuity of our JCC, and our ability to continue providing a full- congregation to serve the Jewish people of the area. Judith z"l & Donald Pripstein have joined the Shapiros with a $50,000 donation and have established The Pripstein Family Endowment Fund.

A donation of at least $50,000 to the endowment fund will allow the donor to name one of the funds as the donor wishes. All such name funds will be joined together to be part of the endowment fund portfolio.

All members are encouraged to help this important effort by contributing to this fund whether as a specific named fund, or as a general donation. Your gift to the fund can be sent to the JCC Office. Please mark your check accordingly.


YAHRZEIT PLAQUES
Space is available for memorial plaques on the yahrzeit boards in the Sanctuary. 
Here is the order form: 


KOL HAKAVOD

Please consider being a part of this campaign to supplement the clergy needs of our congregation. This is a separate, voluntary commitment and is additional to our low annual dues obligation. HERE IS THE LINK TO BRING UP THE DONATION FORM KOL HAKAVOD

JCC FUNDS

Your gift to the JCC support our Clergy, our Congregation and the Community.

ENDOWMENT FUND
This fund was established to assure the continuity of our JCC, and our ability to continue providing a full-service congregation to serve the Jewish people of the area. While a donation of any amount is encouraged, a donation of at least $50,000 allows the donor to name a special or specific Endowment Fund in memory or honor of a specific person event, or family.

GENERAL FUND
Donations to this fund are not earmarked but placed in the general administrative account. Donations to this fund can be in honor or memory of a person, event, or family.

KOL HAKAVOD FUND
Donations to this campaign supplement the clergy needs of our congregation.

RABBI’S DISCRETIONARY FUND
This fund, managed by the rabbi, allows donors to enable the rabbi to do the work of tzedakah in response to the needs of individuals, organizations and the community.

ZENA & JERRY JAY KIDDISH FUND
The Zena and Jerry Jay Kiddush Fund was established in memory of Rabbi Jay's parents to help provide funds for our Saturday morning kiddushes.
JCC INFORMATION
THE JCC OF LBI IS LOCATED AT
2411 Long Beach Boulevard (24th Street)
Spray Beach, NJ 08008
Telephone: 609-492-4090 FAX: 609-492-7550
web site: www.jccoflbi.org  
  
THE OFFICE IS TEMPORARILY CLOSED.
PLEASE USE THE PHONE OR EMAIL WITH REQUESTS.
OUR OFFICE STAFF WILL BE CHECKING IN REGULARLY.
  Staff:
 Leslie Dinkfelt, Office Manager
  Mary Beth Krieger, Staff Member
Tony DeGregorio, Custodial Staff
Kitchen Manager: Susan Berube

USEFUL LINKS
LATEST
BULLETIN:

PRAYER BOOK:
 
WEB SITE:

PAVERS:

TREE OF LIFE
  
YAHRZEIT PLAQUE FORM:

KOL HAKAVOD DONATION FORM
KOL HAKAVOD

TRIBUTES:


CONTACT INFORMATION:
  Rabbi Michael S. Jay

Michael Babst, President

 
E-mail Editor: Rose Valentine 
rvalen1963@aol.com