AUGUST 2018 NEWSLETTER
NEWS FROM THE SOUTHEAST:
DEEP CORAL REEFS DISCOVERED OFF THE SOUTH CAROLINA COAST
Deep below the surface and 160 miles from Charleston, scientists discovered vast reefs of cold-water corals. The discovery of this massive reef indicates there may be many more left to find in the Southeast region. The verdict is still out for how this species, Lophelia pertusa, will fare in acidified conditions- some studies suggest resilience but others point out the hidden impacts to their ability to form reefs. These newly discovered reefs will be important to consider as SOCAN moves forward in efforts to understand the impacts of acidification in the U.S. Southeast. Learn more about the discovery here and check out the coverage in the Post and Courier, CNN, and the Huffington Post! Image credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
STAY TUNED! REPORT OUT FROM THE SC/GA STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP

SOCAN, in conjunction with Ocean Conservancy, held a half day workshop at the South Carolina Aquarium for SC and GA stakeholders. Attendees included representatives of the Gullah/Geechee Nation, stormwater managers, oyster growers and many more. Discussion centered around water quality concerns and changing shellfish habitat in our region. Get the rundown here and stay tuned for the full report next month!
Image: Queen Quet (Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation), Albert George (Director of Conservation, South Carolina Aquarium) and Ed Atkins (Gullah/Geechee Fishing Association member) converse at the SC/GA Acidification Stakeholder Workshop.
NOAA MONITORING SEASONAL AND YEARLY CHANGES IN
SURFACE PH IN CARIBBEAN AND GULF OF MEXICO
NOAA scientists are developing new ways to visualize and monitor surface pH across both seasons and years. These tools help to discern how ocean chemistry is related to overlapping processes, such as seasonal temperature changes, shifting currents, and freshwater runoff from rivers. Learn more about the available data and maps here.
THE ROLE OF ESTUARIES IN GLOBAL CARBON BUDGETS- SATELLITE STUDY IN APALACHICOLA BAY

Estuaries are typically a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere due to the high levels of organic matter that drives intense respiration. Though known to be a source, the extensive seasonal and spatial variability of estuaries limits our understanding of their contribution to global carbon budgets. Research that took place at the Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Florida utilized ocean color satellites to estimate seasonal and annual rates of carbon dioxide release to the atmosphere. The release was highest in winter and summer due to high river flow and high temperatures, respectively, but the estuary was overall a weak source compared to other subtropical estuaries. Learn more about the research here.
SECOORA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Acidification Program are facilitating the operation of the SOCAN to support and encourage discussions on ocean and coastal acidification in the Southeast region.