SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 NEWSLETTER
NEWS FROM THE SOUTHEAST:
THE CONSEQUENCES OF BIG STORMS ON ACIDIFICATION IN THE SOUTHEAST: WHAT CAN WE EXPECT?
Satellite image (top) and visible and infrared data (bottom) showing the flux of carbon into coastal areas of North Carolina following Hurricane Florence. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the  U.S. Geological Survey
Though it's still too early to fully understand the consequences of Hurricane Florence on acidification, a study published this year provides insights from past storms. The research, led by Dr. Hans Paerl's (University of North Carolina Wilmington), found that in dry years, the Neuse Pamlico Sound and Neuse River Estuary were sinks of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In years with at least one large storm, these coastal estuaries were sources of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Historic flooding from Hurricane's Joaquin (2015) and Matthew (2016) resulted in inputs of carbon that caused efflux of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere for several months. Read more about the research in the publication and in this news report.

Dr. Zackary Johnson (Duke University) reported that they were able to maintain sampling at the Piver's Island Coastal Observatory (PICO) with preliminary findings that suggest the largest freshwater flux since monitoring at PICO began.

Both the Duke Marine Lab and UNCW Marine Science sustained damage from Hurricane Florence. Please consider donations ( Duke/ UNCW) and assistance to our partners in their recovery.
SOUTH CAROLINA/GEORGIA STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOP RELEASED

SOCAN, in conjunction with Ocean Conservancy, held a half day workshop at the South Carolina Aquarium for South Carolina and Georgia stakeholders. This workshop was the first public conversation about acidification in SC and GA. A diverse group of attendees discussed changes in coastal water quality, including acidification, and its impact on the important economic and cultural resources of coastal regions. Read the workshop report here.
NOAA FLORIDA KEYS' CORALS ARE GROWING BUT HAVE BECOME MORE POROUS
Researchers extracted cores from two species of corals in the Florida Reef Tract and found that while skeletal extension and calcification rates have remained relatively stable over the last century, skeletal density has declined significantly. These results are different from many other reefs throughout the world, where growth rates have declined too. Read the press release here.
OCEAN VISIONS 2019

The goal of the climate summit is to highlight ocean-based science and engineering successes in the areas of resilience, adaptation, mitigation and sustainability and promote scalable solutions across human, climate and ecological dimensions. Please see the draft agenda here and note the session on "Protecting Ocean Health: Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia." Register here !
JOB OPPORTUNITY: STAFF CHEMIST
The Ocean Acidification Program at Mote Marine Laboratory seeks a staff chemist with a minimum 2 years experience with experimental seawater ocean acidification facilities including carbonate chemistry experience. This position will be located in Summerland Key, Florida at the Elizabeth Moore International Center for Coral Reef Restoration and Research (IC2R3). Learn more and apply here .
SECOORA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Acidification Program are facilitating the operation of the SOCAN to support and encourage discussions on ocean and coastal acidification in the Southeast region.