Spring/Summer 2018
topIn this  Issue
president_reportFROM THE PRESIDENT
Dear colleagues,

What a great meeting in Albuquerque! With over 600 attendees, the 114th CAMWS Annual Meeting is second only to Williamsburg two years ago. The sunny weather, stunning scenery and spacious hotel grounds provided a magical backdrop for a dazzling array of papers, panels, workshops, and roundtables. Some highlights include the opening night panel sponsored by the WCC, "Fashioning Ancient Women on Screen," Steve Lekson's plenary lecture on Thursday evening, "Medieval North America: Chaco and the Cahokia," and the packed Presidential Panel held on Friday at UNM, "Constructions of Girlhood in Graeco-Roman Antiquity." I attended as many sessions as possible and heard many interesting papers. A dedicated group of individuals were critical to the success of this year's meeting, including the highly organized local committee, the University of New Mexico, the hotel staff, and, of course, Tom and Jevanie. And thanks especially to all of the presenters!

As an organization, we have much to celebrate this year. Thanks in large part to the efforts of CAMWS members, the Chancellor at the University of Missouri reversed the recommendation to discontinue the interdisciplinary graduate program in the Department of Ancient Mediterranean Studies. Let's hope our communications with the administration to protect the Classics program at the University of Montana at Missoula will have the same effect. Threatened programs such as these are a stark reminder of the importance of maintaining ties to our professional Classical associations through membership, service on committees, and community outreach. If you aren't yet involved, I urge you to volunteer! An online form can be found at https://camws.org/volunteerform.

It was our great pleasure to adjudicate several awards and prizes, from the First Book Award, which went to Lauren Donovan Ginsberg for Staging Memory, Staging Strife: Empire and Civil War in the Octavia (Oxford 2016) and Alison J. Rosenblitt, E. E. Cummings' Modernism and the Classics (Oxford, 2016). The Presidential Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Paper was given to "A Learned Dog: Roman Elegy and the Epitaph for Margarita" by Grace Funsten (University of Washington). Several other individuals received awards for pedagogy, research collaboration, travel, field work, and outreach. Since not all of these categories received a critical number of submissions, I urge you to remind your students and colleagues of the many opportunities for CAMWS support. A full description can be found here: https://camws.org/awards/index.php.

Several recent initiatives have also borne fruit this year. CAMWSCorps just posted its first podcast, an interview with James Reubel by Krishni Burns, and a fund has been established in his honor. The Development Committee spearheaded the CAMWS Latin Teacher Training Initiative to support K12 Latin teaching training. The Consulares have already contributed more than $5000. You can donate to either these campaigns, along with a number of others, at https://camws.org/donate.

In closing, it has been a great honor to serve as the 114th President of CAMWS. Thanks are owed to immediate past president Alden Smith and president-elect Andrew Faulker for their support, hard work, and collegiality over the past year. And it goes without saying that this job could not be done without the daily, indeed, hourly, efforts of Jevanie Gillan and Tom Sienkewicz. Thank you.

Have a wonderful summer and see you in Lincoln!

Laura McClure
President, CAMWS
st_reportFROM THE SECRETARY-TREASURER
Dear CAMWS Members:

While Jevanie Gillen and I are still recuperating from the memorable 2018 meeting in Albuquerque, we do want to add our thanks to those of Laura's to all the folks who make the meeting such a success. In particular I would like congratulate the Local Committee (Monica Cyrino, Lorenzo Garcia, Osman Umurhan, Luke Gorton and Nikolaus Overtoom of the University of New Mexico, and John Fraser of the Bosque School, as well as a bevy of UNM undergraduate and graduate students) for a job well done. Our President, Laura McClure, also deserves special thanks for organizing such a well-planned meeting.

If you regret having missed this meeting, you can look ahead to the 115th meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska (April 3-6, 2019). Watch for the Call for Papers at the beginning of July and remember the motto of the 2019 Local Committee ("Lincoln, Better than You're Thinkin'"). I have visited Lincoln myself and agree with the committee. The 2019 meeting is worth waiting for!

If you want a dose of CAMWS before the 2019 meeting, you might consider attending the 98th Anniversary Meeting of CAMWS-Southern Section, which will be held in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the Hawthorne Inn and Conference Center at the invitation of Wake Forest University on October 18-20, 2018. Watch for further information at https://camws.org/camws-ssmeeting.

Another group which deserves special thanks consists of all those who serve as CAMWS vice-presidents and members of CAMWS committees. All of these individuals work very hard to insure that CAMWS fulfills its mission of promoting Classics in its thirty-three US states and three Canadian provinces and even beyond those borders. Thank you, all, for your good work.

I would also like to congratulate all those who received awards and scholarships from CAMWS this year. All of these individuals are mentioned by name elsewhere in this newsletter. Their achievements ensure that Classics has a promising future in CAMWS territory.

At its meeting in Albuquerque in April, the CAMWS Executive Committee approved a motion that CAMWS accept in principle the College Greek Exam ( https://camws.org/node/916) as one of its regular activities. The EC has suggested that the current members of the CGE (consisting of Antony Augoustakis of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Mary Pendergraft of Wake Forest University, Benjamin M. Wolkow of the University of Georgia, Wilfred E Major, Albert T. Watanabe and Benjanim F. Howland of Louisiana State University, Carolin Hahnemann of Kenyon College, and Thomas J. Sienkewicz of Monmouth College) to serve as a transitional committee in 2018-2019 and to make a formal recommendation about the exam going forward after 2019.

At the request of Anise Strong of Western Michigan University, the EC also recently approved a motion to sponsor a panel for the 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in May 2019.

Let me remind you that the new membership year begins on July 1st. The membership renewal form is already posted on-line at https://camws.org/membershiprenewal, so if you want to make sure that you keep your CAMWS membership current you might consider renewing now.

As I conclude, I would like thank CAMWS President Laura McClure of the University of Wisconsin for all her help during the past year. Jevanie and I knew that we could always look to her for support when we needed advice and counsel in the CAMWS office and she never failed us when we did. We are also looking forward to working with incoming President Andrew Faulkner of the University of Waterloo during the next year. One special project Andrew and I have taken on is giving CAMWS a more official presence in Canada, especially regarding finances. Watch for more on that topic in the months to come. One last word of thanks goes to my intrepid administrative assistant, Jevanie Gillen, who always manages to keep me and the CAMWS office on the straight and narrow.

Wishing all of you a prosperous and enjoyable summer, I am

Sincerely Yours,
Tom Sienkewicz CAMWS Secretary-Treasurer
deadlinesUPCOMING DEADLINES

Monday, August 20, 2018

  • Deadline for receipt of Panel and Workshop proposals for the 2019 CAMWS meeting in Lincoln.

Saturday, September 1, 2018

Monday, September 24, 2018

Sunday, September 30, 2018

Thursday, October 18 to Saturday, October 20, 2018

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Monday, November 5, 2018

Thursday, November 15, 2018

meeting114 TH ANNUAL MEETING OF CAMWS
The 114th meeting of CAMWS was held on April 11-14, 2018 in Albuquerque, New Mexico at the Hotel Albuquerque at the invitation of the University of New Mexico. The official program is available as a PDF file from the CAMWS website . Many thanks to the Local Committee and to all who came to Kitchener and made the meeting a great success.

You can listen to audio from the banquet at https://camws.org/2018meetingAlbuquerque.
PHOTO HIGHLIGHTS

Welcome to the Hotel Albuquerque!

CAMWS' Emma Vanderpool waiting at the registration table, with UNM graduate student, Sarah Keith, and undergrad volunteers, Luke Lea and Kendall Lovely

Speakers from Wednesday night's opening WCC panel "Fashioning Ancient Women on Screen" (left to right): Hunter Gardner (University of South Carolina), Monica Cyrino (University of New Mexico), Margaret Toscano (University of Utah), and Stacie Raucci (Union College)

Members of CAMWS Committees and Subcommittee pause for the camera during their working lunch meetings on Thursday (left to right): Alison Keith (University of Toronto), Keely Lake (Wayland Academy, WI), Garrett Jacobsen (Denison University),
 Steve Jones (Houston Baptist University)

Thursday plenary session on "Medieval North America: Chaco and Cahokia", with special guest speaker Stephen H. Lekson (University of Colorado Museum of Natural History)  

Enjoying the signature beverage of this year's annual meeting, the Silver Eagle Margarita (left to right): Brandon Jones (Millsaps College), Laura Zientek (Brigham Young University), Morgan Palmer (Tulane University), Bridget Langley (University of Cincinnati),  and Colin Shelton (University of Cincinnati)

On the road again. Friday afternoon meant heading out for the UNM
campus for lunch and more paper sessions.

An august gathering of  augusti past and present: the Consulares' luncheon on Friday. Pictured (left to right): Andrew Faulkner (University of Waterloo), Anne Groton (St. Olaf College), Theodore Tarkow (University of Missouri), Christopher Craig (University of Tennessee), Robert Ulery (Wake Forest University), Michele Ronnick (Wayne State University), Gregory Daugherty (Randolph-Macon College), Michael Gagarin (University of Texas), Antony Augoustakis (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne), James May (St. Olaf College), John Miller (University of Virginia), Laura McClure (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Ward Briggs (University of South Carolina), Jenny Clay (University of Virginia), Peter Knox (Case Western Reserve University), Marilyn Skinner (University of Arizona), Julia Hejduk (Baylor University), Karl Galinsky (University of Texas), Tom Sienkewicz (Monmouth College), Alden Smith (Baylor University)

As always, the CAMWS Banquet featured outstanding food and conversation, as well as a stimulating address from President Laura McClure. It also featured a site not seen in over two decades, Jim May (lower right) enjoying the  Ovationes as an  auditor with St. Olaf College colleague, Anne Groton (to left)

Many thanks to our outstanding local committee from the University of New Mexico (left to right): Lorenza Garcia, Jr., Monica Cyrino, Osman Umurhan, Luke Gorton,
and Nikolaus Overtoom.
resolutionsRESOLUTIONS
WHEREAS, driving along old Route 66 and fearful of alien contact, we steered clear of Roswell and took the left turn we should have took to Albuquerque. We went to the casinos, one for each tribe, and with our winnings we bought enough books to fill our glow-in-the-dark nuclear CAMWS backpacks.

WHEREAS we were fully entrapped in the Land of Enchantment, or was it enchanted by the Land of Entrapment. We were buffeted by wind on Wednesday, wind on Thursday, wind on Friday, and, we expect, wind on Saturday. We drank in, along with Silver Eagle Signature Margaritas, 399 papers, 21 panels, 7 workshops, 18 round tables, and 6 Thursday evening events. All the while we were wrapping ourselves in the latest ancient fashions on screen. We learned with Stephen Lekson how to tell our pyramids and palaces from our pueblos.

WHEREAS, eating red and green chilis at Garduño's, we learned that Christmas means something very different in this state.

WHEREAS the Gathering of the Nations set an example in attendance for one of the biggest CAMWS meetings ever, with 677 registered,

BE IT RESOLVED that we thank the Hotel Albuquerque Old Town for the best xenia since Odysseus stayed at Phaeacia, not to mention the Hotel Chaco and all the others who discounted their rates. Y muchas gracias to all the merchants who gave us 15 per cent off on all their wares. And vico antiquo ipsi, with a sculpture garden fit for Hadrian's villa at Tivoli, we salute you.

BE IT RESOLVED that to the Lobo Organizing Committee, we will ululate eternal praise. We are grateful to the Veni, Vidi, Chile pack of turquoise-clad students for keeping us on the right track, to FLL and other departments at unm.edu who piled the Sandias on Ossa to give us a mythical experience, and to Provost Abdallah for bridging science and art. Who could dis-Agard Walter R. Agard after Laura McClure's timely presidential address?

IN ADDITION,  plaudite nostrum oratorem novum doctissimum et quoque cantorem, Davidum Album, qui dulcissime carmen a Familia Perdicum scriptum, "Ostende mihi viam ad Albam Quercum," cantavit . In so doing, let us not bypass Philip Barnes, Susan Shapiro, and Davina McClain, our recipients of ovationes; or Fernand LaBrunerie (University of Missouri), Evelyn Harris (University of New Mexico), and Donna Zuckerberg (Eidolon), winners of Distinguished Service Awards; or Del Chrol and Mary Pendergraft, honored at this time with SCS teaching awards because, unlike the U.S. Postal Service, snow kept aircraft from their appointed rounds in Boston. We look forward to our inaugural Ruebel Undergraduate Award on Saturday afternoon. And for all the rest, laudandae laudandique are too numerous to mention.

FINALLY, no one can equal the forethought and stamina of our Roadrunners: Emma Vanderpool, a.k.a, "Atalanta;" Jevanie Gillen, a.k.a, "Athena;" and Tom Sienkewicz, a.k.a, "Judah Ben Hur."

BE IT RESOLVED that we will leave Albuquerque with a McClure view of the mountains, to reconvene in 2019, Falconario consule, scilicet Andreio Felice, at the Cornhusker Marriott in Lincoln at the invitation of the University of Nebraska: from corn meal to corn.

April 14, 2018

Luke Gorton
Anne Groton
Kristin Lord
Anatole Mori
Robert White
awards2017-18 CAMWS AWARD WINNERS
CAMWS Orator, David J. White (Baylor University), with this year's recipients, Philip Barnes (left) and T. Davina McClain (right). Susan Shapiro (not pictured) received her award in absentia.

Susan O. Shapiro, Utah State University
Philip V. Barnes, John Burroughs School
T. Davina McClain, Northwestern State University

Audio and video of this year's Ovationes is available at: https://camws.org/awards/ovationes.php.




American School of Classical Studies at Athens Program
Award amounts will be applied toward and up to the program's cost of tuition, room, and board (airfare excluded).

Winner: Christopher Wood, University of Texas at Austin
Runner up: Anthony Parenti, University of Kentucky




American Academy in Rome Program
Award amounts will be applied toward and up to the program's cost of tuition, room, and board (airfare excluded).

Winner: Lindsey Hullinger, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Runner up: Kirk Halverson, Lake Forest High School




Award amounts will be applied toward and up to the program's cost of tuition, room, and board (airfare excluded).

Winner: Gabrielle Bouzigard, University of Texas at Austin, for the Paideia Living Latin Program, Rome
Runner up: Stephanie Dennie, University of Western Ontario




Jeanne Neumann of Davidson College

Since her graduation from Union College in 1976 (with Honors, Phi Beta Kappa), Jeanne Neumann has been teaching Latin. She taught in schools for over a decade, until she decided to pursue her doctorate at Harvard. From there she began teaching at Davidson in 1994, where she continues to be a life-changing teacher. "Dr. Neumann is the one professor who has most influenced my life and the reason that I am pursuing my PhD in Classics today," writes a former student. Another reports that after his first course with her, he decided that he too would write a dissertation on Horace's Epistles 1, despite the fact that he hadn't read them.

What kind of teaching leads to responses like these? A colleague describes Jeanne's contribution to a team-taught course in the western tradition:
She encouraged her audience to consider the possibility of a lifelong relationship with texts such as the Aeneid, and she told how she had been drawn to different parts of the poem at different stages of her life. Finally, Jeanne managed to address her audience as humans concerned with fundamental questions much like those dogging Aeneas, Virgil, and other figures. In contrasting Aeneas and Achilles, Jeanne referred to Aeneas's deep sense of duty, and she referred to him as "a good man trying to do good" -- a description that might separate him from Achilles but that links him to countless students at Davidson. Over the course of fifty minutes, Jeanne cast the Aeneid as essential to the course but also as potentially momentous for individual students in individual ways, long after "The Western Tradition" ends.
Students say that "Dr. Neumann is an excellent teacher in everything she teaches, but she shines most in those subjects that are slightly outside her comfort zone-her love of learning shows her students that learning doesn't stop when you have your degree in hand." They value her willingness to tackle new topics and to become a learner along with the rest of the class. That characteristic showed itself in Jeanne's two Classics Semesters Abroad, where (after making all the travel arrangements) she makes clear to her students that much of what they saw and experienced was new to her, too. Similarly she leads legendary Latin sight-reading groups on Fridays and, like her students, approaches the texts cold.

Her care for students leads her to develop reading lists for their summer months, and even to coach them on dress and comportment. She's the obvious mentor for new or visiting faculty members in her department. Many people know Jeanne best as a long-time advocate of living Latin, a Fellow of Academia Latinitati Fovendae in Rome, and a former member of the board of SALVI. To meet her students' needs and to encourage other instructors in the classroom use of Latin she has developed Companions for Hans Ørberg's first two volumes, works that in the words of a reviewer, do "everything necessary to adapt to present-day needs" a fifty-year-old textbook. Unexpectedly, they have made her famous in home-schooling communities. She has made presentations on this and similar topics to a host of student and teacher groups.

Her commitment to the good of her department has led this passionate Latinist to reimagine their introductory Greek sequence, and currently she is teaching the second iteration of a double class, covering the work of two semesters in one. Greek enrollments, shrinking everywhere, have begun to grow under her care. While her service to Davidson College and to our profession is significant, I single out her term as President of the North Carolina Classical Association, because that group's motto is docendo discimus -- through teaching, we learn. As her students and colleagues have made clear, Jeanne Neumann lives this truth.




Jessie Craft, Glenn High School, Winston-Salem, NC
  
Jessie Craft's first degree was in Italian. Soon he realized that his true vocation lay with us as a Latin teacher: He earned his second B. A. at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, this time in Latin with teacher certification, and he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.

Since 2013 he has taught full time, and currently serves two schools in Winston-Salem NC. To quote one of his colleagues, "Glenn is a disadvantaged high school with about 50% of its population receiving free or reduced lunch. Mt. Tabor serves a more diverse population ranging from the economically disadvantaged to the wealthy. Regardless of the population, Jessie takes into account every student that he teaches." At each of these very different schools he teaches LAT 1-4, sponsors a JCL chapter and a Latin honor society-and also one AP course. He began "meeting his students where they are" by designing Minecraft projects on Roman architecture-think Legos online. Jessie reflects, "Over the past five years I have lost four Latin students to suicide or gang violence. Statistically speaking, this is not the usual demographic to sign up for Latin. While Minecraft was bringing more students into my class, the language elements were still troublesome for me and my kids. To expose my kids to educated and reflective discourse, I looked to ancient philosophy, and thus was born the Quote of the Day." This short opportunity for reflection is what many former students cite as the most meaningful part of the class.

Jessie recognized that they were still not meeting his goal of learning Latin, and to remedy that lack he turned to research on second language learning and the use of comprehensible input. Because he persisted in the belief that he must meet all his students where they are, he individualized classroom materials. Says one student, "He faced yet another difficult scenario, having Latin III, Latin IV, and AP Latin students in a hybrid class, and again he took the time to evaluate each student and provide materials to best suit his or her ability level, some of which he had created himself, embedded with readings of authentic texts. I have never observed the same determination to ensure that each student is learning and being challenged according to their individual abilities in any other teacher." "He creates videos in Latin to both assist in Latin understanding and teach about various elements of Roman culture, which are both engaging and helpful as they again immerse students in actually hearing the language, not just reading it," writes another.

"Jessie's students are not the only beneficiaries," reports a colleague. "At our monthly Professional Learning Team (PLT) meetings, Jessie influences those of us with thirty years' experience as much as those with two months'. Members continually seek his advice. Our district has not adopted a new Latin text in more than twenty years; consequently, we find ourselves limited to stilted adapted passages. Jessie has begun writing level appropriate texts, which include embedded readings of authentic texts, for all levels of Latin."

Teachers and students far from North Carolina have access to many of these fine resources online, at MagisterCraft.com and on YouTube at DivusMagisterCraft.

For his passionate and unstinting efforts on behalf of students at all levels of Latin and all family backgrounds, and his generosity in sharing the fruits of his labor, we salute Jessie Craft.






Lauren Donovan Ginsberg, University of Cincinnati: Staging Memory, Staging Strife. Empire and Civil War in the Octavia (Oxford University Press, 2016)

J. Alison Rosenblitt, University of Oxford: E. E. Cummings' Modernism and the Classics (Oxford University Press, 2016).
It is a pleasure to present the two CAMWS First Book awards this year to Lauren Donovan Ginsberg (University of Cincinnati) for her book Staging Memory, Staging Strife. Empire and Civil War in the Octavia (Oxford University Press, 2016) and to J. Alison Rosenblitt (University of Oxford) for her book E. E. Cummings' Modernism and the Classics (Oxford University Press, 2016).
The criteria for this award include excellent quality, wide significance within a scholarly domain, and demonstrated awareness of international trends. We are especially interested in books which shift the conversation substantially in the relevant field of research.
Committee members lauded Ginsberg's book as a "compelling and beautifully written study" of intertextuality and cultural memory in the Octavia, which will surely have a broad impact on the scholarship of this play and its reception in the theatre world. The book "provides for the first time a full conceptual framework within which to approach the Octavia's intertextuality." One committee member praised Ginsberg's "sensitive and meticulous" readings, while another noted that she "admirably and convincingly deals with the thorny issue of stagecraft."
Rosenblitt's book was commended as a "groundbreaking" and "innovative" work with "truly remarkable research," which defines E. E. Cummings' place within the Classical tradition and presents newly edited writings from the poet's years at Harvard. According to one member of the committee, Rosenblitt "demonstrates a wide knowledge of Classical literature and gives particularly sensitive readings of his engagement with Vergil and Horace. Another member wrote that "Rosenblitt [builds] an overwhelming case that we should hear a streak of classical influence and adaptation throughout Cummings' poetry."
Congratulations to Drs. Ginsberg and Rosenblitt.






Erin K. Moodie, Purdue University:  Plautus' Poenulus: A Student Commentary (University of Michigan, 2015)
Erin K. Moodie's Plautus' Poenulus: A Student Commentary (University of Michican Press, 2015) is an excellent addition to the available intermediate Latin commentaries, observing that more are needed, and particularly ones like Plautus' Poenulus, which does not do all the work for the student. One member summarized well the excellent features of this commentary: "The rich introduction to Plautus' meters and manuscript tradition, the general background to Roman drama and the specific background of the Poenulus, one of the most complicated of all Plautus' plays, and the enviable command of scholarship on Plautus make this commentary an excellent choice as a scholarly ... but accessible treatment of the play. The grammar references are useful as is the layout of the references and notes."
Judith M. Barringer, University of Edinburgh: The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (Cambridge University, 2014)
Judith M. Barringer's The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (Cambridge University Press 2015) is a "lovely" introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, with its many beautiful illustrations and fine layout. One member noted that "the writing is clear and engaging, communicating a wide range of issues in the study of art and archaeology, including how the excavation history of a site often shapes later interpretations, questions of repatriation and provenance," while another commented that the book was "innovative" and would be "appealing to today's students." It was agreed that Barringer's textbook is an outstanding introduction for students who possess little or no background in ancient Greek art.  



"The Living Odyssey Project: Greek Myth in 21st Century American Folklore"
Krishni Burns and Samantha Lindgren, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

"Chrysis: A New Editon of Enea Silvio Piccolomini's Comedy"
Alden Smith and Cynthia Liu, Baylor University




Winners:
Ashley Choo-Hen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Liliana Talwatte, University of Michigan
Mark Krause, Ripon College
Jamie Wheeler, Baylor University
Eva Buchanan-Cates, Kenyon College
Abigail Breuker, Agnes Scott College

Honorable Mention:
Monique Vera, Washington University in St. Louis 




Committee Chair, Lorenzo Garcia Jr. (far right), with award recipients. 

TEACHER TRAINING AWARDS

Rebecca Pomeroy, University of Massachusetts
Abby L. Lease, St. Ambrose Academy
Micheal A Posey, The Episcopal School of Baton Rouge

TRAVEL AWARDS (left to right in photo)

Spencer Kyle Smith, Fort Worth Country Day
Timothy Brannelly, Longview High School
Samuel L. Kindick, University of Colorado Boulder
Eryn Pritchett, University of Notre Dame
Amy Leonard, Grady High School
Nicholas Cross, Queens College, CUNY
Samuel Hahn, University of Colorado Boulder



RUEBEL UNDERGRADUATE TRAVEL AWARDS

Mrs. Ruebel (left) and President-Elect, Andrew Faulkner (back row, right), with
 this year's recipients (left to right below).

Austin Aozora Hattori, University of Georgia
Jamie Wheeler, Baylor University
Chad Michael Uhl, University of Kansas
Kirby Schoephoerster, St. Olaf College
Stephanie Wong, Loyola University, Chicago
Katherine Aberle, University of Mississippi (not in picture)







Evelyn Harris, University of New Mexico (top, with Local Committee members)
Fernand LaBrunerie, University of Missouri (bottom left, with David Schenker)
Donna Zuckerberg, Eidolon (bottom right, with Laura McClure)

Audio of the award presentations is available at https://camws.org/awards/service.php.




Grace Funsten, University of Washington: "A Learned Dog: Roman Elegy and the Epitaph for Margarita"

Runners-Up:
Isabella Reinhart, University of Pennsylvania, "Sound in Ennius Annales"
Brian McPhee, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, "Weird Pathos: Stesichorus’ Geryoneis and the Sympathetic Monsters of Apollonius’ Argonautica"



CPL AWARD FOR THE OUTSTANDING STATE VICE-PRESIDENT

Garrett Jacobsen, Ohio



CPL AWARD FOR THE OUTSTANDING REGIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT

Marcia Lindgren, Plains Region




K-12

David Withun, Savannah Classical Academy
Benjamin Payne, Savannah Classical Academy
Michele Valerie Ronnick, Wayne State University

College/University

Laury Ward, Hillsdale College 




Peter Knox Award: Alex Lee, Florida State University

Devon Lawson, Coe College
Molly Schaub, University of Michigan
Caitlin Pallas, University of Georgia, Athens




Susanna McClellan, University of Georgia - Teacher: Dr. Benjamin M. Wolkow
Jacob Gerber, Grinnell College - Teacher: Dustin Dixon
William Thompson, Tufts University - Teacher: Anne Mahoney
Peter Rachofsky, Colombia University - Teacher: Katherina Volk



CAMWS ADVANCED GREEK PRIZE

Yanxin Li, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
latin_contest2017-18 Latin Translation Contest
HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS

Summas gratias to the many volunteers who made this year's competition possible:

Contest Committee Members:

Jason Nethercut, University of South Florida (FL); Debbie Felton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (MA); Sarah Ellery, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN); Chris Ann Matteo, Washington Latin Charter Public School (DC); William Duffy, Alamo College (TX); Nick Fletcher, Hawken School (OH); Krishni Burns, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (IL); Katie James, Vanguard College Preparatory School (TX); Co-Chair Margaret Musgrove, University of Central Oklahoma (OK); Co-Chair Ryan Sellers, Memphis University School (TN).

Contest Graders:

Latin Two: Kate Hattemer, Flint Hill School (VA); Nora Murphy, Shaker Heights High School (OH); Pierre Habel, D'Evelyn Junior / Senior High School (CO); Randall Nichols, Westminster Schools of Augusta (GA); Christine Conklin, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA); Tom Cirillo, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN); Ryan Sellers, Memphis University School (TN)

Latin Three: Trey Suddarth, Memphis University School (TN); Thomas Marier, Marist School (GA); Deanna Solomon, Classical Cottage School (VA); Marilyn Reinhardt, Memphis University School (TN); Marni Dillard, John Burroughs School (MO); Matthew Moore, Eleanor Roosevelt High School (MD); Meredith Kendall, The Bolles School (FL); Ryan Sellers, Memphis University School (TN)

Latin Four: Tom Garvey, The Meadows School (NV); Alan Farnsworth, Walton High School (GA); Alleyne Rogers, TMI - The Episcopal School of Texas (TX); Brandtly Jones, St. Anne's-Belfield School (VA); A.W. Saunders, Marist School (GA); Karl Frerichs, University School (OH); Kelly Ryan, The Lovett School (GA)

Latin Five: Nicoletta Villa-Sella, The Linsly School (WV); Keely Lake, Wayland Academy (WI); Heather Paff, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ); Jennifer Luongo, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (TX); Ryan Sellers, Memphis University School (TN)

Standby: Patrick McFadden, St. Mary's Episcopal School (TN)
  • 56 schools in 19 states (and one European country) participated in the contest. Georgia (9 schools) and Virginia (8 schools) were the states with the greatest representation.
  • Official submission numbers: 557 Intermediate and 479 Advanced (1036 total). Compared to last year, this marks a 5% increase in the total number of submissions.
  • 28 schools submitted their exams via traditional US mail; 28 schools submitted their exams electronically.
  • Awards were distributed proportionally according to the level of Latin. (For example, since about 60% of the Intermediate exams were from Latin Three, 60% of the awards in this level went to Latin Three.)
  • In order to make the contest as fair and objective as possible, all of the grading was blind, and all of the papers were evaluated according to AP-style translation "chunks."
  • In determining the top awards, ties did not cause substantial problems. When ties were a factor, awards were distributed to achieve a balance between the different graders.
  • In some cases, the number of Certificates of Commendation may be a little lower or higher than the stated 20% threshold, depending on how the ties worked out.
  • Names of winners are listed in descending order of performance. 

Intermediate Contest - Level Two

 

Total Number of Exams Submitted: 237

Average Score: 16 / 43

 

I. Cash Award Winners (top 2%), Average Score: 37 / 43

 

Student, School, Teacher

Ali Warraich, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

Sarah Park, North Gwinnett High School (GA), Jeremy Martin

Mishaal Omer, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

Ethan Robertson, Classical Cottage School (VA), Deanna Solomon

 

II. Book Award Winners (top 3%) Average Score: 32 / 43

 

Student, School, Teacher

Anya AitSahlia, Oak Hall School (FL), Generosa Sangco-Jackson

Isabel Tanco, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Cooper Grinspun, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Alex Niederer, University School (OH), Karl Frerichs

 

III. Certificates of Commendation (top 20%) Average Score: 26 / 43

 

Student, School, Teacher

Anna Smith, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Alma Gamper, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Margaret Anne Coleman, The Lovett School (GA), Conway Brackett

Ona Munoz, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Max Shackelford, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Charlotte Aexel, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

Major Glenn, Houston High School (TN), Abigail Simone

Kethan Sareen, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Stephanie Hutchings

Isaac In, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Stephanie Hutchings

Chiara Kremer, The Lovett School (GA), Conway Brackett

Amanda Thomas, The Linsly School (WV), Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Hunter Smith, The Linsly School (WV), Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Chiara Stocco, Classical Cottage School, Deanna Solomon

Jackson Wilds, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

Emmalyn Hoover, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Katie Yokoyama, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Heather Paff

Fawwaz Omer, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Aina Casassas, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Alesya Dewland, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Samuel Brown

Caitlin Filep, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

Warren Barry, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Alexandria Carson, The Linsly School (WV), Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Grace Yan, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Teresa Baciero, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Maya Chande, North Gwinnett High School (GA), Jeremy Martin

Mike Agler, Sequoyah High School (GA), Greg Ross

Hart Gowen, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Shaurik Deshpande, Ravenscroft School (NC), James Martin

Ethan Albertson, Classical Cottage School, Deanna Solomon

Paula Gil, Aula Escola Europea (Spain), Montse Bastons

Mae Shippen, Pace Academy (GA), Elizabeth Kann

Shreya Akula, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Stephanie Hutchings

Will Schuessler, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Watts Miller, Memphis University School (TN), Marilyn Reinhardt

Sheena Lai, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Riley Reynolds, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

Natalie Fleshman, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Shiva Rudra, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Heather Paff

Akshay Saluja, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

Gloria Sung, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Samuel Brown

Mika Kretzmann-Clough, Eleanor Roosevelt High School (MD), Matthew Moore

Elizabeth Pierce, Houston High School (TN), Abigail Simone

Maddie Behnke, Thales Academy APEX Junior High / High School (NC), Angela Tuminno

Astra Burke, Girls Preparatory School (TN), Ralph Covino

Jay Robertson, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Heather Paff

 

Intermediate Contest - Level Three

 

Total Number of Exams Submitted: 320

Average Score: 22 / 43

 

I. Cash Award Winners (top 2%), Average Score: 40 / 43

 

Student, School, Teacher

Rob McFadden*, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Arjun Puri, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Reid Chandler, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Eleanor Campbell, Ravenscroft School (NC), Jonathan Avery

Zach Brown, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Tom Cirillo

Vincent Chen, University School (OH), Peter Millett

* = perfect score!

 

II. Book Award Winners (top 4%), Average Score: 37 / 43

 

Student, School, Teacher

Kyle Koester, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Matt Schiavone, Shaker Heights High School (OH), Nora Murphy

Lily Darnell, Covington Latin School (KY), Kelly Kusch

Andrew DeWeese, Charlotte Latin School (NC), Michael Johnson

Jay Cunningham, St. Stephen's and St. Agnes School (VA), Ian Hochberg

Arvind Saligrama, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

 

III. Certificates of Commendation (top 20%), Average Score: 32 / 43

 

Student, School, Teacher

Zoe Kane, Wayland Academy (WI), Keely Lake

Cole Burton, Sequoyah High School (GA), Greg Ross

Evelyn McCrady, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Thomas Zeuthen, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Tom Cirillo

Christiana Albrecht, St. Mary's Episcopal School (TN), Patrick McFadden

May Feinleib, Shaker Heights High School (OH), Nora Murphy

Will Snider, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (TX), Jennifer Luongo

Jared Stone, The Meadows School (NV), Kris Lorenzo

Will Portera, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Duncan Crowder, Westminster Schools of Augusta (GA), Randall Nichols

Vivi Lu, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Paul Grajzl, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Theodora Bowne, Shaker Heights High School (OH), Nora Murphy

Sarah White, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Justin Novellas, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Ben Codell, Covington Latin School (KY), Kelly Kusch

Madeline Zhang, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Katie Hieb, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

Victoria Ouyang, St. Mary's Episcopal School (TN), Patrick McFadden

Sarah Baxter, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Stephanie Morgan, Fort Worth Country Day (TX), Bryan Carlson

Michael Gayoso, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Charlie Eason, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Thomas Coyne, University School (OH), Peter Millett

Walker Byrd, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Tom Cirillo

Taya Lorenz, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX), John Rocklin

Pranav Rajbhandari, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Madison Hesse, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

Lenae Joe, The Meadows School (NV), Kris Lorenzo

Ryan Burns, Summit Country Day School (OH), Larry Dean

Lucas Prado, TMI - The Episcopal School of Texas (TX), Alleyne Rogers

Garrett Greiner, TMI - The Episcopal School of Texas (TX), Alleyne Rogers

Jack Wellford, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Jonathan Huang, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Gregory Guo, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Ethan Zhang, Charlotte Latin School (NC), Michael Johnson

Ryan Garuccio, Covington Latin School (KY), Kelly Kusch

Mary Margaret Lehmkuhler, St. Stephen's and St. Agnes School (VA), Ian Hochberg

Ingrid Sukow, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Cailin Semro, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Stephanie Hutchings

Elizabeth Brady, Sequoyah High School (GA), Greg Ross

Stewart Moore, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Tom Cirillo

Gabriella Couloubaritsis, St. Mary's Episcopal School (TN), Patrick McFadden

Seth Richey, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Brian Scherer, Flint Hill School (VA), Ken Andino

Alyssa Higgins, Houston High School (TN), Abigail Simone

Dylan Marler, Houston High School (TN), Abigail Simone

Neeraj Raja, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Holly McCann, Ravenscroft School (NC), Jonathan Avery

Sinead de Cleir, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Alex Beckham, Covington Latin School (KY), Kelly Kusch

Marko Patrovic, Sequoyah High School (GA), Greg Ross

Aemelia Westmoreland, Sequoyah High School (GA), Greg Ross

Eliana Yuke, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Stephanie Hutchings 

 

Advanced Contest - Level Four

 

Total Number of Exams Submitted: 293

Average Score: 11 / 44

 

I. Cash Award Winners (top 2%), Average Score: 38 / 44

 

Student, School, Teacher

Minyoung Huang, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Alan Zhang, Walnut Hills High School (OH), Michelle Martinez

Michael Ambrosius, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Sarah Ellery

Elisabeth Rabjohns, Loudoun STEM and Classical School (VA), John Siman

John Kim, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Vineet Gangireddy, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

 

II. Book Award Winners (top 6%), Average Score: 29 / 44

 

Student, School, Teacher

Loyd Templeton, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Calvin Lucido, Flint Hill School (VA), Ken Andino

Julianne Cuevo, Flint Hill School (VA), Ken Andino

Campbell Rosener, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Travis Hill

Kevin Reidy, Covington Latin School (KY), Kelly Kusch

Peter Hattemer, Walnut Hills High School (OH), Michelle Martinez

Ty Williams, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Sean Longbrake, Covington Latin School (KY), Kelly Kusch

Harry Sage, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX), Evan Rap

Paul Lee, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Sarah Ellery

Jacob Sloman, Pace Academy (GA), Elizabeth Kann

Victoria Toledo, Brookfield Academy (WI), Ruth Osier

 

III. Certificates of Commendation (top 20%), Average Score: 21 / 44

 

Student, School, Teacher

Ashleigh Witherington, home school (FL), Mark Buzbee

Joshua Nkenchor, Flint Hill School (VA), Ken Andino

Robert Hegler, University School (OH), Karl Frerichs

Ethan Lam, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Victoria Ayres-Ibarra, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

James Mohn, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX), Evan Rap

Isabella Hay, Marist School (GA), Thomas Marier / A.W. Saunders

Henry Wood, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Alex Pilloff, Flint Hill School (VA), Ken Andino

Kevin Le, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Henna Nam, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Lillian Bishop, The Linsly School (WV), Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Elliana Laton, BASIS Tucscon North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

Laurel Humphreys, BASIS Tucscon North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

Anne Ruperto, The Bolles School (FL), Meredith Kendall

Jacob Leung, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Tyler Fertel, University School (OH), Karl Frerichs

Knox Massey, The Lovett School (GA), Kelly Ryan

Robbie Lammens, Sequoyah High School (GA), Greg Ross

Brandan Roachell, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Warren Turner, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Riley Rosener, Scottsdale Preparatory Academy (AZ), Travis Hill

Ethan Hurst, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Zuhair Somjee, Memphis University School (TN), Ryan Sellers

Pooja Talati, St. Mary's Episcopal School (TN), Patrick McFadden

Atticus Glen, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN), Sarah Ellery

Somasundari Hannon, The Linsly School (WV), Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Jack Googe, The Lovett School (GA), Kelly Ryan

Sarah Pincus, Oak Hall School (FL), Generosa Sangco-Jackson

Almira Arnold, John Burroughs School (MO), Avery Springer

Aru Mahendrakar, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Varun Krishnaswamy, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

James Harrison, The Lovett School (GA), Kelly Ryan

Julia Howell, The Lovett School (GA), Kelly Ryan

Kaitlyn Catapano, Mountain View High School (GA), Jaime Claymore

Sam Mehdi, The Meadows School (NV), Tom Garvey

Eamon McKeever, Durham Academy (NC), Edith Keene

Meenakshi Balan, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Lillian Scott, BASIS Tucson North (AZ), Patrick Yaggy

Mohammed Hyder, Houston High School (TN), Abigail Simone

Brandon Harris, Summit Country Day School (OH), Larry Dean

Johanna Kohleisen, The Bolles School (FL), Meredith Kendall

Gabrielle Li, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

 

Advanced Contest - Level Five

 

Total Number of Exams Submitted: 186

Average Score: 13 / 44

 

I. Cash Award Winners (top 2%), Average Score: 41 / 44

 

Student, School, Teacher

Simon Van Der Wide, Flint Hill School (VA), Howard Chang

Emma Ellis, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Noah Harris, Oak Hall School (FL), Generosa Sangco-Jackson

Margot Armbrusta, Brookfield Academy (WI), Cynthia Twetten

 

II. Book Award Winners (top 6%), Average Score: 35 / 44

 

Student, School, Teacher

Jocelyn Robertson, Classical Cottage School (VA), Deanna Solomon

Celia Anderson, The Meadows School (NV), Kris Lorenzo

Matteo Stocco, Classical Cottage School (VA), Deanna Solomon

Anna Miele, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Sayeed Akhtar, Flint Hill School (VA), Ken Andino

Elizabeth Li, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Sophia Dort, Oakcrest School (FL), Ellen Payne

Zoe Boggs, Durham Academy (NC), Edith Keene

 

III. Certificates of Commendation (top 20%), Average Score: 28 / 44

 

Student, School, Teacher

Kyle Neary, Marist School (GA), Thomas Marier / A.W. Saunders

Henrike Schmalfuss, Oak Hall School (FL), Generosa Sangco-Jackson

Charles Mayock-Bradley, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Daniel Rhodes, Classical Cottage School (VA), Deanna Solomon

Adithi Ramakrishnan, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Charlotte Fontham, St. Stephen's and St. Agnes School (VA), Ian Hochberg

Militsa Sotirova, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Chang Yu, Memphis University School (TN), Trey Suddarth

Joseph Delamerced, Summit Country Day School (OH), Larry Dean

Davis DeFoor, Summit Country Day School (OH), Larry Dean

Connor Merritt, University School (OH), Karl Frerichs

Anna Miele, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Elizabeth Beveridge, The Lovett School (GA), Ken Rau

Hunter Sigmun, John Burroughs School (MO), Marni Dillard

Luanna Summer, John Burroughs School (MO), Marni Dillard

Medhini Rachamallu, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Alex Harrison, Charlotte Latin School (NC), Karen McQuaid

Emily Hetzel, D'Evelyn Jr. / Sr. High School (CO), Pierre Habel

John Erskine, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Wendy Yao, Walton High School (GA), Alan Farnsworth

Gautam Apte, Shaker Heights High School (OH), Nora Murphy

Claire Cofield, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Margaret Lee, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

Natalie Chin, Thomas Jefferson High School (VA), Christine Conklin

Austen Dellinger, Durham Academy (NC), Edith Keene

Charlotte Abry, Rockbridge County High School (VA), Patrick Bradley

 

COLLEGIATE RESULTS

 

Many thanks to the committee members for their efforts this year:

 

Contest Committee Members:

 

Jason Nethercut, University of South Florida (FL); Debbie Felton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (MA); Sarah Ellery, Montgomery Bell Academy (TN); Chris Ann Matteo, Washington Latin Charter Public School (DC); William Duffy, Alamo College (TX); Nick Fletcher, Hawken School (OH); Krishni Burns, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (IL); Katie James, Vanguard College Preparatory School (TX); Co-Chair Margaret Musgrove, University of Central Oklahoma (OK); Co-Chair Ryan Sellers, Memphis University School (TN)

 

The committee members served as graders for the college contest.

  • 33 schools in 18 states and 1 Canadian province participated. Virginia, Michigan, Texas, North Carolina, and Florida had the most schools entered.
  • A total of 407 students entered (241 intermediate, 196 advanced), a slight decrease from last year's 417. However, only 308 papers (155 intermediate, 153 advanced) were submitted and graded.
  • All but 3 schools submitted their results electronically rather than by traditional US mail.
  • In order to make the contest as fair and objective as possible, all of the grading was blind, and all of the papers were evaluated according to AP-style translation "chunks."
  • In determining the top awards, ties did not cause substantial problems. When ties were a factor, awards were distributed to achieve a balance between the different graders.
  • In some cases, the number of Certificates of Commendation may be a little lower or higher than the stated threshold, depending on how the ties worked out.
  • Names of winners are listed in descending order of performance.

Intermediate Contest

 

I. Cash Award Winners (top 3%)

 

Student, School, Teacher

1. Sanji Bhavsar, Washington Univ. St. Louis, Timothy Moore

2. Max Rohleder, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Andrea Pittard

3. Sarah Reynolds, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Elizabeth Adams

4. Joe Ferrara, Purdue Univ., Erin Moodie

5. Elizabeth Green, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Andrea Pittard

 

II. Book Award Winners (top 10%)

 

Student, School, Teacher

1. Mary Margaret Ryland, Hillsdale College, Laury Ward

2. Joey Bricker, Univ. of St. Thomas, Lorina Quartarone

3. Teresa Henderson, Ave Maria Univ., Joseph W. Yarbrough

4. Natasha di Virgilio, Hillsdale College, Laury Ward

5. John Bogert, Franklin & Marshall Coll., Gretchen Meyers

6. Somiyah Mughni, Univ. of South Florida, Robert Hedrick

7. Eric Carson, Univ. of South Florida, Robert Hedrick

8. Vivian Guyton, Washington & Lee Univ., Adrienne Hagen

9. Nate Johnson, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Margaret Clark

10. Noah Kontur, Washington Univ.-St. Louis, Timothy Moore

 

III. Certificates of Commendation (top 25%)

 

Student, School, Teacher

1. Matthew McShurley, Christendom College, Kevin Tracy

2. Derek Seifert, Xavier Univ., Shannon Hogue

3. Rebecca Atwood, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Andrea Pittard

4. Cole Curtiss, Grand Valley State Univ., Quinn Griffin

5. Casey Hamlet, Washington & Lee Univ., Adrienne Hagen

6. Carson McKoon, Washington & Lee Univ., Adrienne Hagen

7. Lijun Cao, Purdue Univ., Antonia Syson

8. Brendan Labbe, Univ. of Illinois-Urb.Cham., J. Stanull

9. Patton Hpone Myint Tu, Sewanee: Univ. of the South, Kyle Mahoney

10. Caroline Deloren, Washington & Lee Univ., Adrienne Hagen

11. Kaitlyn Bultemeier, Purdue Univ., Erin Moodie

12. Pano Kostouros, Purdue Univ., Antonia Syson

13. Iris Puryear, College of William & Mary, M. Swetnam-Burland

14. Robert Yancy, College of William & Mary, M. Swetnam-Burland

15. Jennie L. De Paul, College of William & Mary, M. Swetnam-Burland

16. Michael Bell, Univ. N. Carolina-Greensboro, Susan Shelmerdine

17. Kevin Hitchings, George Washington Univ., Wayne Millan

18. Michael Mortellaro, Univ. of S. Florida, Robert Hedrick

19. Rebecca Pimentel, Brigham Young Univ., Karen Macfarlane

20. Rachel Reese, College of William & Mary, M. Swetnam-Burland

21. Jessica Kosek, Kenyon College, Zoe Kontes

22. Ely Peteet, Kenyon College, Zoe Kontes

23. Aubrey Bourret, Brigham Young Univ., Karen Macfarlane

24. Elliot Sherren, Brigham Young Univ., Karen Macfarlane

25. Melanie Trump, Univ. of S. Florida, Robert Hedrick

26. Braxton Wall, Washington & Lee Univ., Adrienne Hagen

27. Madison Hoaglund, Washington & Lee Univ., Adrienne Hagen

 

Advanced Contest

 

I. Cash Award Winners (top 3%)

 

Student, School, Teacher

1. Catherine Johnson, Davidson College, Keyne Cheshire

2. Parker DiPaolo, Univ. of Virginia, Gregory Hays

3. Bramwell Atkins, Sewanee: Univ. of the South, Stephanie McCarter

4. Ryan Yeazell, Xavier Univ., Thomas Strunk

5. Kelsie Stewart, Brigham Young Univ., Roger Macfarlane

 

II. Book Award Winners (top 10%)

 

Student, School, Teacher

1. Irene Carriker, Univ. of Dallas, David Sweet

2. Jamie Wheeler, Baylor Univ., M. DiLuzio/A. Smith

3. Thomas Hogan, Univ. of Dallas, David Sweet

4. Emma Clifton, Hillsdale College, David Jones

5. Kathleen Kelly, Ave Maria Univ., Joseph W. Yarbrough

6. Stephen Bothwell, Xavier Univ., Thomas Strunk

7. James Will Koster, Univ. of Illinois-Urb.Cham., B. Walters

8. Jacob Hornecker, Univ. of St. Thomas, Lorina Quartarone

9. Patrick Callahan, Univ. of Dallas, David Sweet

10. Michael Sloman, Univ. of Georgia, John Nicholson

 

III. Certificates of Commendation (top 25%)

 

Student, School, Teacher

1. Laura Cermak, Christendom College, Kevin Tracy

2. Allison Moller, East Carolina Univ., Lisa Ellison

3. Sarah Adison Phillips, Mississippi St. Univ., Salvador Bartera

4. Jacquelyn Lee, Univ. of Dallas, David Sweet

5. Vinayak Eranezhath, Univ. of Georgia, Christine Albright

6. Elijah Mears, Univ. N. Carolina-Greensboro, David Wharton

7. Laura E. Graham, Univ. of Illinois-Urb.Cham., B. Walters

8. Emma Frank, Hillsdale College, Gavin Weaire

9. Maxwell Wood, Ave Maria Univ., Joseph W. Yarbrough

10. Sean Mangan, Univ. of Dallas, David Sweet

11. Elizabeth Hamm, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Andrew Riggsby

12. Beth Eidem, Dickinson College, Marc Mastrangelo

13. Harrison Dinsbeer, Davidson College, Keyne Cheshire

14. Cynthia Liu, Baylor University, M. DiLuzio/A.Smith

15. Josef Chlachula, Univ. of St. Thomas, Lorina Quartarone

16. Hanna Searic, Brigham Young Univ., Roger Macfarlane

17. Seth Levin, Dickinson College, Marc Mastrangelo

18. Justin Blair, Univ. of Tennessee, Christopher Craig

19. Ian Myers, Univ. of Texas-Austin, Kevin Pluta

20. Harper Hansen, George Washington Univ., Katherine Wasdin

21. Patrick Merkle, Brigham Young Univ., Roger Macfarlane

22. Mary Clare Kelly, Christendom College, Andrew Beer

23. Peter Liffrig, Ave Maria Univ., Joseph W. Yarbrough

24. Daniel M. Stelzer, Univ. of Illinois-Urb.Cham., B. Walters

25. Matthew Manno, Kenyon College, Evelyn Adkins

26. Russell Clark, Washington Univ.St.Louis, Timothy Moore

27. Sneha Adusumilli, Univ. of Illinois-Urb. Cham., B. Walters

cplCPL FUNDING IN ACTION
UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HOSTS FIRST ANNUAL
LATIN TEACHERS DAY!

On Saturday, April 7, the Department of Religious Studies and Classics hosted its first annual Classics Teachers Day on campus. Nineteen K-12 teachers from the Tucson and Greater Phoenix areas, thirteen University of Arizona Classics M.A. students, and seven Classics faculty attended the gathering together with workshop speaker Justin Slocum Bailey. Funding was provided by the Department of Religious Studies and Classics and by a Bridge Initiative grant from the Classical Association of the Middle West and South.

After attendees had enjoyed a catered al fresco lunch at the Learning Services Building, the program began with a warm welcome to all participants from Classics faculty. Next, Dr. Marilyn Skinner, Legate for Arizona from the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), Dr. Arum Park, State Vice-President for the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), and Dr. Cynthia White, a member of the Executive Board of the American Classical League (ACL), spoke on the advantages of belonging to their respective professional organizations. Dr. White also discussed the ACL Placement Service and brought promotional items in the form of ACL pens, sticky notes, and coasters, which were eagerly received. Junior Classical League representative Sarah Palumbo talked informally about JCL participation and distributed T-shirts. Finally, Dr. Rob Groves summarized the many enrichment benefits available to Classics majors and minors at the University of Arizona, particularly through study abroad programs, and urged teachers to bring that information back to students thinking about college.

Participants then adjourned to the Modern Languages Building, where Justin Slocum Bailey conducted a riveting 2.5-hour workshop based upon his "Indwelling Language" methods of second-language instruction. While the primary focus involved getting a class of introductory Latin students to feel comfortable speaking and comprehending oral Latin, Mr. Bailey also demonstrated applied techniques for helping listeners grasp and recall many kinds of material presented in a classroom setting. Enthusiastic conversations after the event indicated that attendees had found this workshop quite valuable.

The event as a whole was well received and the organizers are already discussing preparations for next year!

For more photos from the event, please see our facebook page here!
2017-18 Bridge Initiative Grants
  • CANES High School Visit Day 2018 - Department of Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies, University of Wisconson in Madison, William Brockliss
  • 6th Grade Summer Blitz - Glasgow Middle School, Baton Rouge, LA, Nathalie Roy
  • Greek and Roman Comedy at the North Carolina Junior Classical League Convention
    Wake Forest University, T. H. M. Gellar-Goad
  • Homerathon - University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Mike Lippman and Matthew Loar
  • Nevada Junior Classical League State Convention - American Preparatory Academy, Neoma Williams
  • Classics Teacher Day - University of Arizona, Department of Religious Studies and Classics, Arum Park
  • Where Greece, Rome, and Egypt Collide: Cleopatra VII; Humor and Politics in the Art of the New Kingdom - Northwestern State University, T. Davina McClain
  • Rising 9th Grade Night Promotion - Grady High School, Amy Leonard
  • Wisconsin Classics Day UW-Madison - Beloit College, and Lawrence University, Adriana Brook
  • West Virginia Junior Classical League - The Linsly School, Nicoletta Villa-Sella
  • Philologia Perennis: A Latin Podcast - Tom Keeline
  • SNAP! (Southern Nevada Amici Pratis) - Meadows School, Tom Garvey
  • Virginia Junior Classical Convention - Rockbridge County High School, Patrick Bradley
  • Savannah Symposium on African American History and Liberal Education - Savannah Classical Academy, David Withun
  • Lunch with Students and Guest Speaker, Hunter Gardner, Associate Professor & Classics Program Director at USC - Wake Forest University, Ted Gellar-Goad
  • Texas Tech Classics Day - Texas Tech University, William Tortorelli
  • Certamen Buzzers - Desert Springs Christian Academy, Karen Caroe

2018 Caristia Grants

  • Southern Nevada Certamen, David Fisher
  • The Colosseum's Awning: A Reassessment of the Theories, Michelle Ronnick
  • Secret Saturnalia Celebration, Tom Garvey

Travel Grants

  • Fairview High School, Lynn LiCalsi
  • St. Michael's Academy, Sr. Therese Marie
CJNEW IN THE CLASSICAL JOURNAL
VOL. 113 / NO. 4


IF YOU'LL BE MY BODYGUARD: SIMONIDES THE MERCENARY IN XENOPHON'S HIERON

by Mitchell H. Parks

Abstract: All of Xenophon's works contemplate the nature of leadership, but the Hieron is unique in how rigorously it engages with the problem of the leader's self-interest. Hieron dwells on his personal finances and mistrust in the loyalty of others, which spoil his security and happiness. These problems are exemplified and exacerbated by his reliance on a mercenary bodyguard. Xenophon's choice of Simonides as Hieron's interlocutor can be explained through Simonides' reputation for self-interest, parallel to that of the bodyguard and of Hieron himself. Simonides' traditional characterization as one who combined avarice with wisdom renders him a sympathetic and useful advisor.

VERGIL, OCTAVIAN AND ERIGONE: ADMIRATION AND ADMONITION IN THE PROEM TO GEORGICS 1

by Katheryn Whitcomb

Abstract: In the proem to Book 1 of his Georgics, Vergil discusses the catasterism of Octavian, placing his new star between the constellations Erigone and Chelas. The prologue and the catasterism have both been widely discussed by scholars, but surprisingly Vergil's uncommon identification of Erigone as the Maiden constellation (rather than the more common Virgo, or even Iustitia) has largely avoided comment. This paper will argue that Vergil deliberately identifies the Maiden as Erigone in order to create a multi-layered allusion which both praises Octavian while at the same time calling into question the kind of "justice" practiced by the princeps.

THE SPECTACLE OF GAZES: SEEING AND BEING SEEN IN THE FIRST BOOK OF HORACE'S EPISTLES

by Silvia Speriani

Abstract: In ancient Rome, city-life unfolded in a spectacular exchange of social gazes. My paper focuses on the visual dynamics in the social life of Rome through the approach shown by Horace in Epistles 1: from his first letter, the poet programmatically declares himself "watched enough," dramatizing his claim for independence through a visual motif. I demonstrate that Horace shows a heightened sensitivity to the visual experience: on the one hand, he lays bare the disturbing role that visual ties play in city life; on the other hand, he himself relies on visual interactions in redefining his social role and, above all, his relationship with Maecenas.

CAPUT MUNDI: FEMALE HAIR AS SYMBOLIC VEHICLE OF DOMINATION IN OVIDIAN LOVE ELEGY

by Nandini B. Pandey

Abstract: This paper suggests some far-reaching symbolic implications for women's hair in Latin love elegy. Hairdressing, hairdressers and hair loss provided a metaphorical vehicle by which Tibullus (1.8), Propertius (2.18), and above all Ovid (Ars Amatoria 3; Amores 1.11-12, 2.7-8, 1.7, and 1.14) interrogate the power relationships that underpin Roman society: between master and slave, women and men, Rome and her provinces. In my analysis, elegiac hair becomes an index to the socioeconomic realities of urban self-fashioning as well as a locus of anxiety about Rome's increasing reliance on imported labor and consumer goods.
TCLNEW IN  TEACHING CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

RECENT AND FORTHCOMING ARTICLES
Special Issue:
  • "Perspectives on the Revised Standards for Classical Language Learning"
    Articles from teachers, methods course instructors, and authors of the Standards (coming soon)
Teaching Classical Languages welcomes articles offering innovative practice and methods, advocating new theoretical approaches, or reporting on empirical research in teaching and learning Latin and Greek. Contact John Gruber-Miller, Editor, Teaching Classical Languages , Cornell College, Mount Vernon, IA 52314, jgruber-miller@cornellcollege.edu .
camws_newsCAMWS NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
CAMWS Member Save with Oxford!

Oxford University Press is offering a 25% discount on its entire Classics list to all CAMWS members. Go to https://camws.org/oup-promotion to take advantage of this promotion. Please note that only CAMWS members can access this page with their personal email address and a password which has been sent to all current members.
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR CAMWS 2019

The 115th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South will be held Wednesday-Saturday, April 3-6, 2019, at the The Cornhusker hotel in Lincoln, Nebraska at the invitation of the University of Nebraska. Proposals for panels, workshops, individual papers and round-table discussions on any aspect of Graeco-Roman antiquity are now being accepted. Especially welcome are submissions likely to be of broad interest, including those on pedagogy. Teachers and students at any level (K-12, college, or university) may submit proposals, but papers written by undergraduates will be evaluated separately and assigned to sessions designated for them.

All panel abstracts and workshop proposals (with accompanying abstracts) must be received by 11:59 p.m. on Monday, August 20, 2018. All individual paper proposals must be received by 11:59 p.m. on Monday, September 24, 2018. Round table discussion proposals must be received by 11:59 p.m. on Monday, November 5, 2018.

All panel and individual abstract submissions will be judged anonymously by the Program Committee, chaired by CAMWS President Andrew Faulkner of the University of Waterloo in Ontario.

An individual may deliver no more than one paper or workshop at the meeting and may submit no more than one abstract. A person is free to organize a panel, or a workshop, or a round-table discussion in addition to presenting a paper (whether in his/her own panel or in another session). No one whose paper has already been accepted for a panel or a workshop may submit an individual abstract. An organizer may submit no more than one proposal for a panel or a workshop. A panel must have a minimum of three, and no more than six, papers. Workshops must have at least one presenter and one presider and include significant activities for audience participation.

Papers delivered at CAMWS should present new ideas to the audience, not repeating work already presented in a similar venue. Members are welcome to present work delivered at the author's home institution, at a specialized conference, or at a meeting outside North America, especially if it is work-in-progress that would benefit from wider discussion. However, if an abstract has been accepted for a meeting of a regional or national classical organization in the United States or Canada, it must not be submitted for the CAMWS meeting, unless it has been substantially changed.

Authors of abstracts and organizers of panels/workshops are not to be identified by name anywhere in their proposals. The panel or workshop organizer will submit a description of the panel or workshop along with the abstracts of the panelists or workshop participants. All submissions must follow these Formatting Guidelines for CAMWS Submissions. Submissions which do not follow these guidelines will be returned to the author for revision.

The maximum time for an individual paper is 15 minutes.  Papers in panels with fewer than six participants may exceed this time limit, but no panel may last longer than 100 minutes. Workshops will typically last one hour. Requests for audio-visual equipment must be made at the time the abstract is submitted. CAMWS welcomes papers on material culture and reception; however, because LCD projectors are expensive to rent, please request them for textually-based papers only when necessary. Individuals must provide their own laptop computers and adapter/sound cables. CAMWS cannot provide internet access during presentations.

Please submit all proposals electronically at Individual Abstract Submission Form, Panel Submission Form, Workshop Proposal Form or Round Table Discussion Proposal Form. If, for some reason, electronic submission is not possible, please contact the CAMWS office at the address below.

All presenters and organizers are required to be members of CAMWS for the 2018-2019 fiscal year (July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019) at the time the proposal is submitted. No proposal can be accepted if the author's membership is not current.

Membership can be renewed using this on-line membership form: http://camws.org/ membership/memberinfo.php. Dues can be paid on-line by credit card via PayPal ($3.00 processing fee) or by mailing a check along with a copy of the membership form to CAMWS, Department of Classics, Monmouth College, 700 E. Broadway, Monmouth, IL 61462 (office 309-457-2284; fax 815-346-2565; camws@camws.org).

The Program Committee will reach its decision about proposed panels and workshops by September 14, 2018 and individual abstracts by November 14, 2018.

Individuals whose papers have been accepted are expected to register for the CAMWS meeting by December 31, 2018. The cost of registration increases significantly after that date.

Please be aware that submission of an abstract implies a commitment to present the paper in person in Lincoln. In the rare instance that a paper must be read in absentia due to extenuating circumstances, the author is expected to arrange for a reader at the appropriate session and also to register for at least one day of the meeting.

RECEIPT DEADLINES
Monday, August 20, 2018 for Panels / Workshops
Monday, September 24, 2018 for Individual Abstracts
Monday, November 5, 2018 for Round Table Discussions



MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL

It is time to renew your membership for the coming year. Please use the Individual Membership Form or, for institutions, the Institutional Membership Form on the CAMWS website.



ILLINOIS CLASSICAL STUDIES

A reduced rate subscription to Illinois Classical Studies is now available for CAMWS members:
  • $42 for print (regular rate $55)
  • $50 for electronic (regular rate $65)
  • $70 for print + electronic (regular rate $91)

Subscribe with your annual membership renewal or go to this order form.


 

 



DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS AT CAMWS

This year, the CAMWS annual conference hosted its first ever Dungeons and Dragons session. 22 attendees helped teams of little known Argonauts make the perilous trip from Mysia to Colchis after they were left behind by Jason. After overcoming angry river spirits, clashing rocks, and roving bronze bulls, our heroes successfully rejoined their compatriots at Aietes' palace. In proper mythical fashion, our first session ended with two different stories of heroes' adventure, with the river spirits being either mollified or boiled depending on the table. Join us for a new adventure in Lincoln, Nebraska!
institutional_membersFROM OUR INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS


LIVING GREECE IN GREECE
August 4-19, 2018


Course Description

Living Greek in Greece is an intensive introduction to spoken Attic Greek. In two seminar-style meetings every day, participants read and discuss ancient Greek literature and philosophy in Attic Greek. Each year, readings are organized around a theme; the theme for 2018 is Fury, and attendees will read Euripides' Orestes. Program participants will also stage and perform the play in the original Greek (abridged), with original (modern) music. The Orestes was the most popular of Euripides' plays in antiquity and is one of his most controversial today. In addition to the daily seminar sessions, Living Greek in Greece includes a variety of optional programing designed to build students' facility in speaking and understanding Greek, as well as lectures both in English and (ancient) Greek on topics relating to classical as well as modern Greek culture. Every year Living Greek in Greece also features a trip to important sites that are relevant to the year's theme. In 2018, the course will go to Mycenae to visit the fabled palace of Agamemnon and Orestes, as well as Epidaurus to see a modern production of classical theater on the ancient stage.

Prerequisites

Participants should have a basic reading knowledge of Attic Greek. This is usually the equivalent of at least one year of Greek at the university level.

Classroom and Housing

Living Greek in Greece is held at the Hellenikon Idyllion, a hotel and Hellenic cultural center located in the charming seaside village of Selianitika on the north coast of the Peloponnese. Classes take place outdoors in a lush garden, just a few meters from the beach. Accommodation at the Idyllion in shared bungalow apartments is included in the cost of the course. All apartments have a full bath, kitchens or kitchen access, and air conditioning. Groceries can be purchased in the village and there are numerous seaside tavernas within walking distance. The garden also has fruit trees available to the program's participants.

Living Greek in Greece Staff
Claire Catenaccio, Joseph Conlon, Anna Conser, Richard Hutchins,  Darrel Janzen, Catherine Lambert, Jason Pedicone, Alex Petkas

Tuition and Fees

The cost of Living Greek in Greece is $2750. This amount includes tuition, housing, course materials, and site visits. Airfare and transport to and from the airport is not included. The Paideia Institute is able to offer a number of full and partial scholarship to students with financial need. Please visit our scholarships page to learn more.

Academic Credit

Starting in 2015, academic credit will be available for Living Greek in Greece on an optional basis through Brooklyn College. Students taking Living Greek in Greece for credit enroll as students at Brooklyn College, take a final exam and pay an additional Brooklyn College tuition of $2400 ($800 / credit) for non-residents of New York State and $1140 ($380 / credit) for New York residents directly to Brooklyn College. All students seeking credit for should indicate this on their application. The Paideia Institute will support students admitted to Living Greek in Greece through the Brooklyn College application and enrollment process.




LIVING GREEK IN GREECE HIGH SCHOOL
July 18-August 1, 2018


Course Description

Living Greek in Greece High School offers an intensive introduction to the Ancient Greek language in the rich cultural setting of modern Greece. It is specifically designed for high school students. The program accommodates a range of levels of preparation: we welcome beginner participants who have not even learned the Greek alphabet, but we also offer specialized instruction for students who have had the equivalent of a year or more of college Greek. Students will encounter Ancient Greek texts from a wide range of times, places, and intellectual traditions, including the works of Homer, Plato, the New Testament, and the Byzantines.

Learning Ancient Greek can also help us understand and connect with other modern cultures, especially with Greeks today. For that reason, this program is committed to balancing time spent reading and in class with exploring that common ground through learning about and enjoying modern Greek food, music, and dance.

Our itinerary will include many places and sites of ancient and modern significance: Athens, Corinth, Nafplio, Epidaurus, Olympia, Delphi, and the island of Zakynthos.

Prerequisites

Students of all high school grade levels are encouraged to apply. No prior knowledge of Ancient Greek is necessary.

Classroom and Housing

For the duration of the course, students and teachers live together in the center of Athens, and then in hotels in each Greek city they visit. Classes will take place in high quality facilities on or near the premises of residence. Program participants eat together daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. They will be provided these meals either at our housing facility or at local restaurants.

Living Greek in Greece Staff

Joseph Conlon, Eugene Cunningham, Amy Garland, Alex Petkas

Transportation

The Institute will coordinate a group flight accompanied by a Paideia staff member, from New York City's John F. Kennedy Airport to and from Athens. Students may also travel directly to Athens, where they will be met at the airport by Paideia staff.

Chaperoned transportation to Living Greek in Greece High School will also be arranged for students attending Living Latin in Rome High School just prior to the program's start.

Tuition and Fees

The cost of Living Greek in Greece (High School) is $3850. This amount includes tuition, housing, meals, site visits, course materials, and transportation to and from Athens International airport. Airfare is not included.

The Paideia Institute is able to offer a number of full and partial scholarship to students with financial need. Please visit our scholarships page to learn more.

other_organizationsNOTICES FROM OTHER CLASSICAL ORGANIZATIONS

FIEC CALL FOR PAPERS AND POSTERS - LONDON 2019

The 15th annual conference of the Fédération Internationale des Associations d'Études Classiques (FIEC) will take place in conjunction with the 2019 Classical Association Annual conference on 4th-8th July 2019 in the Institute of Education (UCL) in Bloomsbury, London. FIEC business meetings will take place on 4th July, and the conference proper will begin on 5th.

We expect hundreds of classicists from all over the world and at any stage in their career to attend, to hear plenary lectures from international leaders in our field, to present and hear papers, to participate in debates and discussions and to take part in cultural activities and workshops.

The Programme Committee is now inviting proposals for panels and posters.

Each panel will be of 2 hours duration. We anticipate that many panels will consist of 4 short papers united by a common theme. We also invite proposals for panels and workshops in different formats, but within a 2 hour block.

We aim to select a range of panels that reflects the breadth of traditional and non-traditional classics, including but not limited to Greek and Latin literatures of all periods, linguistics, ancient history in its widest sense, philosophy and religion, art and archaeology, Neo-Latin and Byzantine studies, and the past and current reception of the classics in all media and in different cultures and traditions. We also welcome panels drawing on comparative and interdisciplinary studies. We anticipate there will be panels discussing national traditions in classical research and that some panels will deal with non-Greek peoples such as Etruscans, Persians and Phoenicians. We especially encourage panels dealing with pedagogy and outreach.

It is the tradition of both FIEC and the Classical Association to represent as wide a range of speakers as possible. Panels are more likely to be selected if they include speakers from more than one country, and if they include junior as well as senior speakers. Panels consisting only of men or only of women are unlikely to be selected unless a powerful case is made for an exception. Each panel proposal should include a title for the session, the names and affiliations of all speakers, and a 150 word abstract for each paper and for the panel as a whole. The deadline for proposals is 1st September 2018. They should be sent to fiec2019@ucl.ac.uk. One named person should be the proposer and should provide a contact e-mail. It is not necessary that she or he be the chair of the panel, but if not then the name of the chair should be indicated in the proposal. If the proposal is for a very different format to a multi-speaker panel, the proposer is strongly encouraged to contact the Programme Committee as far in advance as possible. The Programme Committee expects to make its selections over the course of the summer and by the end of September at the latest. Its decisions will be final.

The Programme Committee also invites proposals for posters. Posters may present individual or collaborative projects, and scholars of all career stages are encouraged to apply. Proposals for posters should also be sent to fiec2019@ucl.ac.uk by the 1st September 2018 and selection will take place on the same time scale as for panels. Proposals for posters should include a 150 word description of the subject and the name and contact details of the poster presenter.

Please note that we are not inviting proposals for individual papers.

Further details of the conference will appear in due course on a dedicated website linked from both the FIEC and Classical Association websites. Details of any student bursaries will also be published in due course, along with suggestions for accommodation. Attendees, including those giving papers in panels, and/or presenting posters, will need to pay their own travel and accommodation costs given the large number of delegates and speakers expected.

We look forward very much to welcoming you in London next year.

contributors2017-18 FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS TO CAMWS
Awards & Scholarships

John Breuker, Jr.
Joel P. Christensen
Christopher P. Craig
Rickie E. Crown
G. Edward Gaffney
Katherine A. Geffcken
Charles A. George
Nicolas P. Gross
Rebecca R. Harrison
Liane Houghtalin
Eleanor W. Leach
Jacob E. Nyenhuis
Stephanie M. Pope
Osman S. Umurhan

Benario Fund

Lynne McClendon

Bolchazy Fund

Helena R. Dettmer
Charles A. George
Anne H. Groton
Stanley A. Iverson
Eddie R. Lowry, Jr.
Martha J. Payne
Stephen Pilewski

CPL

Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association

Excavation/Fieldschool Prize

Monessa F. Cummins
Laura Gawlinski
Charles A. George
Peter E. Knox and Sandra L. Blakely
Martha J. Payne
Tyler Jo Smith

General Fund

Anonymous
Marie C. Bolchazy, in loving memory of Ladislaus J. Bolchazy, Ph.D.
Joel P. Christensen
Jenny S. Clay
Ann Raia Colaneri
Paolo Custodi
James H. Dee
Lisa Ellison
Stephen C. Fineberg and Brenda Fineberg
Kristopher F. B. Fletcher
Alison Futrell
Charles A. George
Jevanie A. Gillen
Peter M. Green
Rebecca R. Harrison
Sharon L. James
Matthew G. Katsenes
James G. Keenan
Dennis P. Kehoe
Joy K. King
Sherwin D. Little
Alexander C. Loney
Stephanie A. McCarter and Daniel S. Holmes
Laura K. McClure
Thomas McGinn
Jon D. Mikalson
Sophie Mills
Matthew Murphy
Christopher Nappa
Stephen A. Nimis
Jacob E. Nyenhuis
Martha J. Payne
Christine G. Perkell
R. G. Peterson
John R. Porter
Thomas J. Sienkewicz
Kathryn A. Simonsen
Niall W. Slater
Zoe Stamatopoulou
Marcia M. Stille
David W. Tandy
Theodore A. Tarkow
Margaret M. Toscano
Knudsvig Fund

Stanley A. Iverson

Other

Charles A. George

Ruebel Fund

Mark Morford
Connie Ruebel
Thomas J. Sienkewicz

Teacher Training Initiative Fund


Patrick Abel
Emily E. Baragwanath
Herbert W. Benario and Janice M. Benario
Mary T. Boatwright
Clara Bosak-Schroeder
Ward W. Briggs
Ruth R. Caston
Howard W. Chang
Jenny S. Clay
Christopher P. Craig
Owen C. Cramer
Monica S. Cyrino
Michael Gagarin
Karl Galinsky
Anne H. Groton
Richard J. Hebein
Julia D. Hejduk
Sharon L. James
Cynthia A. King
James M. May
Laura K. McClure
Jon D. Mikalson
John F. Miller
Martha J. Payne
Stephen Pilewski
William H. Race
Teresa R. Ramsby
Michele Valerie Ronnick
Gareth L Schmeling
Ruth Scodel
Adam Serfass
Carl A. Shaw
Thomas J. Sienkewicz
Marilyn B. Skinner
Niall W. Slater
John Svarlien and Diane Arnson Svarlien
Theodore A. Tarkow
Bonnie Tinsley
Ariana E. Traill
Robert W. Ulery, Jr.
Henry Upton
Susan F. Wiltshire

Total Donation Amount: $19856.00
IMsINSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS 2017-18
There was a record number of 130 institutional members this year!

* CAMWS would like to welcome 1st-time Institutional Members

Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN
Ave Maria University, Ave Maria, FL
Ball State University, Muncie, IN
Baylor University, Waco, TX
Beaumont School, Cleveland, OH
*Bolles School, Jacksonville, FL
*Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA
Brock University, St. Catharines, ON
Brown University, Providence, RI
Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI
Carleton College, Northfield, MN
Charlotte Latin School, Charlotte, NC
Christendom College, Front Royal, VA
College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO
Concordia College, Moorhead, MN
Covington Latin School, Covington, KY
Davidson College, Davidson, NC
Denison University, Granville, OH
DePauw University, Greencastle, IN
Duke University, Durham, NC
*Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
*East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Eta Sigma Phi, Memphis, TN
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Fort Worth Country Day, Fort Worth, TX
Furman University, Greenville, SC
Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI
Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, MI
Hollins University, Roanoke, VA
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
John Burroughs School, St. Louis, MO
John Carroll University, University, OH
Kenyon College, Gambier, OH
Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
Loyola University, Chicago, IL
Loyola University, New Orleans, LA
Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA
Marshall University, Huntington, WV
Miami University, Oxford, OH
Millsaps College, Jackson MS
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL
Montgomery Bell Academy, Nashville, TN
National Latin Exam, Fredericksburg, VA
*Oakcrest School, Vienna, VA
Ohio University, Athens, OH
*Pacifica Christian High School, Newport Beach, CA
Paideia Institute, Brooklyn, NY
Philology Institute, Wilmore, KY
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Randolph College, Lynchburg, VA
Rice University, Houston, TX
Ripon College, Ripon, WI
*Scholé Academy, Camp Hill, PA
St. Catherine University, Saint Paul, MN
St. Olaf College, Northfield, MN
Samford University, Birmingham, AL
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX
Trent University, Peterborough, ON
Trinity University, San Antonio, TX
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO
Tufts University, Medford, MA
University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
*University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
University of Dallas, Irving, TX
University of Georgia, Athens, GA
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD
University of Maryland, College Park, MD
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
University of Mississippi, University, MS
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul, MN
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
University of Texas, Austin, TX
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC
Wayland Academy, Beaver Dam, WI
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH 
membershipMEMBERSHIP
INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP

Individual membership in CAMWS for the fiscal year July 1 through June 30 may be purchased for $65 ($30 for student, retiree, first-time teacher, or new CAMWS member; $45 for contingent faculty). Joint spouse/partner membership is available for $90, retired spouse/partner membership for $50. A life membership costs $1200 for an individual and $1600 for joint spouse/partner.

A membership includes a one-year subscription to The Classical Journal as well as on-line access to the Loeb Classical Library. Please indicate on the membership form whether you would prefer to receive CJ electronically (via JSTOR) or in print. For an extra $5 you may receive the journal in both formats. Please note that membership in CAMWS provides electronic subscription only to the current volume of CJ. CAMWS members wishing to have access to back issues of the journal can do so at a special rate through JStor. Please contact Tom Sienkewicz at stcamws@camws.org for additional information.

The CAMWS Newsletter is sent electronically to all members with e-mail addresses. If you would like to receive a print version in addition, you may indicate that on the membership form.

As part of your CAMWS membership, you are automatically subscribed to Classical Journal On-Line from which you will received frequent reviews of new books in the classical field, unless you indicate on the membership form that you opt out of this subscription. 

Membership in CAMWS also includes on-line access to the Loeb Classical Library. (Please note that it may take two or more weeks following payment to process this on-line access.) CAMWS members can also request a complimentary subscription to Greek Keys.

Please note: Individual memberships or subscriptions to CJ sent to an address outside the United States or Canada are subject to a $20 postage surcharge. Individual subscriptions automatically include membership in CAMWS.

You may use the CAMWS membership form to join ACL or SALVI, subscribe to any of eight other scholarly journals, order a copy of Herbert Benario's CAMWS: A History of the First Eighty Years, purchase various CAMWS merchandise (including 6-inch 'Roman' rulers, a CAMWS YoYo, shot glasses or koozies) and/or make a tax-deductible contribution to CAMWS.

An individual must be a current member of CAMWS in order to 1.) submit panel, workshop or individual paper proposals for the annual meeting, 2.) register for the annual meeting; 3.) apply for any CAMWS awards or scholarships, including CPL awards; or 4.) hold a CAMWS office or serve on a CAMWS committee. If you are already a CAMWS member and wish to order CAMWS memorabilia or subscribe to other journals, please use this Miscellaneous Order Form.

How to Join or Renew Your Membership

Please use this electronic membership form: www.camws.org/membership/memberinfo. Payment by credit card is possible through the CAMWS web site (A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.) or you can print out this membership form and mail it to CAMWS with a check or money order drawn on a U.S. bank or a bank that uses U.S. routing codes to:

CAMWS
Monmouth College
700 E. Broadway
Monmouth, IL 61462


INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP

If your institution or organization becomes a member of CAMWS, it receives the following benefits:
  • One CAMWS award for an outstanding student to be chosen by your institution. The student receives a congratulatory certificate stating that your school has designated the student as a recipient of a CAMWS Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies for the current academic year, plus a free membership in CAMWS for the following academic year. As CAMWS members, these students would have full access to the on-line Loeb Classical Library. To designate your student honoree(s), please complete the on-line award designation form and submit it no later than May 1st for each academic year. For a list of previous recipients, see CAMWS Award For Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies.
  • The option to choose up to two additional student award recipients ($30 each). Payment required by May 1st of each academic year.
  • A certificate stating your institution's support of CAMWS
  • Eligibility for your students to compete in the CAMWS Sight Translation Contests (required for colleges and universities)
  • Publication of institutional announcements free of charge in the CAMWS Newsletter and on the CAMWS website.
  • 20% discount on ads in the annual meeting program and in The Classical Journal.
  • For K-12 Institutional Members, one complimentary registration at the CAMWS Annual Meeting (not including the banquet)
  • Inclusion on the list of CAMWS Member Institutions, which will be
    • printed in the program of the CAMWS Annual Meeting (if membership is received prior to the printing of the meeting program)
    • printed in the CAMWS Newsletter (if membership is received by May 1st)
    • posted on the CAMWS Website (with hotlinks to the websites of institutional members)

Institutional membership also supports CAMWS awards and scholarships and efforts to promotion Classics in the CAMWS region.

 

Becoming an Institutional Member

 

Any educational institution or organization can become a member of CAMWS by paying an annual fee of either $60 (for a K-12 school or a college or university offering a B.A. in Classics), $75 (for a college or university offering a M.A. only in Classics) or $110 (for a university offering a Ph.D. in Classics). The cost of additional student honorees is $30 per student (maximum two).

 

To become an institutional member (and/or to order up to two additional student honorees), you can use this on-line form: camws.org/membership/institutionform.php.

 

Payment can be made by check via groundmail or online by credit card or Paypal account A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.

 

You many also become an institutional membership of CAMWS by printing this Institutional Membership Form and sending a check or money order to:

 

CAMWS

Monmouth College

700 E. Broadway

Monmouth, IL 61462

 

If your institution requires an invoice to pay by check, please send an email to stcamws@camws.org to request an invoice.
members_in_the_newsCAMWS MEMBERS IN THE NEWS
COLOSSEUM RECUPERATUM:
Norma Goldman's Model Rediscovered

by Michele Valerie Ronnick, aa3276@wayne.edu

Norma and Bernard in front of the Erechtheum c. 1960
Last November at Wayne State University in Detroit a message came in from academic staff officer Douglass Davis in the Department of Africana Studies to his counterpart, Amanda Donigian, in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures saying that a large cache of items once belonging to Norma Goldman (1922-2011) had been found in an unused office on the ninth floor of the historic Maccabees Building designed by one of Norma's favorite architects, Albert Kahn, in 1927. These included photographs, inventories of ancient oil lamps, computer disks and slides, many books and an array of other artifacts. The question was, were we interested in picking them up? You bet we were. Norma had been part of Wayne State University since her matriculation at Wayne State in 1939 until her death just two weeks before her last book was published. This was My Dura Europos: The Letters of Susan M. Hopkins, 1927-1935 (Wayne State University Press, 2011), a book she had worked on with her husband Dr. Bernard Goldman who had been a student of Dr. Clark Hopkins, (Mary's husband) at the University of Michigan.

Nick Young looking over the model.
To have some of her things reappear six years after her death was both mysterious and thrilling. I made a quick reconnaissance trip over to the Maccabees building to assess the situation and knew at once that more hands than my own would be needed. I immediately called Nick Young, master Latin teacher with almost twenty-eight years of service at the University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy, to ask if he would be willing to help sort through and identify the items. Nick had known Norma and Bernard for decades beginning in the mid-1960s when he had enrolled in Wayne State's Department of Greek and Latin and later earned his B.A. in 1969 and his M.A. in 1972.

On the appointed day Nick arrived with Steven Krepp, a beginning Latin teacher at UDJHS and I brought along two of my own students, Sean Oberc and Greg Urbeil. As we sorted through Norma's things and our memories of her, we discussed what should be done with the most amazing find -- Norma's scale model of the Colosseum. She had devoted considerable time to her study of this building publishing "Reconstructing the Roman Colosseum Awning," Archaeology 35.2 (1982): 57-65 and later worked on a NOVA documentary with Bernard titled "Secrets of Lost Empires: Colosseum" which was aired by PBS on February 12, 1997. Her scale model had helped her think through various theories about the design of the Colosseum, but it was now showing signs of age and some damage. We decided that Nick should take it back with him to UDJHS for restoration. 

Jack's statue.
Since then his students have been making repairs and have even made some additions. Jack Chekal used a 3-D printer to create a statue of Apollo/Nero, and Connor Hicks, following the advice of his art teacher Michele Mooney, has been working to find the appropriate paint colors. Both Nick Young and Claudia Foerg, chair of the Science Department at UDJHS, see it as a perfect union between the ancient and the modern, and one that brings classical engineering and design to bear upon principals of modern technology. Principal Anthony Trudel has endorsed their efforts and when the project is finished plans are in the works to put the model on display in one of the public areas of the brand new state-of-the-art Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Center at UDJHS. In January 2018 we decided to celebrate the progress that had been made. With the support of a Caristia Grant, Nick Young came back to his alma mater to give a public lecture on the construction of the Colosseum to students at WSU whose audience included the members of our Classics Club.



SHARE YOUR NEWS

Do you have recent professional news? Promotion? Book or article award? Major grant? Send it to CAMWS. We love to feature success stories from our members.
classics_newsCLASSICS IN THE NEWS
In June, the Guardian highlighted recent work on the lives and contributions of African-American Classicists, including the work of CAMWS' own Michele Ronnick:  Hidden figures: the importance of remembering black classicists.

Although a slow month for Classics news overall, May closed with an NPR story on recent finds from the ongoing excavations at Pompeii.

Sadly, April brought news of proposed program cuts at Henry Clay High School in Lexington, KY and at the University of Montana, Missoula.

In March, the Associated Press covered the growth of programs in which veterans explore the struggles of war and homecoming through reading the Iliad and Odyssey: " 'Homer can help you': War veterans use ancient epics to cope".

In February, the New Yorker explored the topic of " Reading Ovid in the Age of #MeToo".
obitus_recentesOBITUS RECENTES
Abierunt Ad Maiores
Listed here are those individuals whose deaths have come to the attention of CAMWS since the last Business Meeting. A full listing of deceased members may be found on our Necrology of CAMWS Members page. You are invited to leave comments, anecdotes, and other loving remembrances of these CAMWS members on the CAMWS Necrology Blog.
submissionsSUBMISSIONS
The CAMWS Newsletter is published three times per year, in the fall, winter, and spring/summer. The deadline for the fall edition will be October 15, 2018. Send submissions by email:  Timothy_Heckenlively@baylor.edu or newsletter@camws.org. Send submissions by regular mail to:

Dr. Timothy Heckenlively
CAMWS Newsletter Editor
Department of Classics
Baylor University
One Bear Place #97352
Waco, TX 76798

If you have questions, email or call 254-710-1399.
Follow CAMWS on Facebook and Twitter!