San Leandro Unified
Employee Wellness
Newsletter
Be Kind and Keep Smiling
Since our last edition, the world has become a radically different place for us all to try to stay well. Even though this forum has always focused on health and wellbeing, navigating the Spring of 2020 is pushing all of us to find a new kind of balance in unfamiliar waters.

Despite these challenges, SLUSD continues to be a place of positivity and hope. Thank you for your resilience, creativity, and dearly missed smiles. We see you and are so fortunate to be Zooming through this with you.
SPOTLIGHT ON SITE: Monroe Elementary
Monroe Elementary staff banded together to make a movement video to inspire their students and families to keep moving during their sheltering time. Watch out, 7 minute workout...Monroe has a 6:18 entry into the fitness world that will get you out from behind those desks!
Dependent Care Account Participants
American Fidelity recognizes many customers have a need to cancel/change their Dependent Care Account (DCA) elections. If you need to make a change to your status, the form can be located here:


Completed form must be submitted to Veronica Sanchez, Employee Benefits Specialist at vsanchez@slusd.us for approval.

Also, as a result of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), additional medical expenses are now eligible for reimbursement from your Health Savings Account (HSA), Flexible Spending Account (FSA), or Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA). The CARES Act allows HSA, FSA, and HRA participants to be reimbursed for over-the-counter drugs and medicine without a prescription from a physician. Additionally, menstrual products are now eligible for reimbursement.

Your Claremont Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
We all know there are many benefits to being an SLUSD employee. But did you know that you have access to FREE professional, confidential counseling? Here are some of the many ways the EAP can help:
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Counseling Visits

Free counseling for personal issues, including:
• Marital/Relationship issues
• Parenting/Family issues
• Depression
• Stress
• Substance abuse
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Work/Life Referrals

Referrals and information for:
• Child care
• Elder care
• Pet care
• Adoption assistance
• School/College assistance
• Health and wellness
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Legal Consultation

Assistance with legal issues such as:
• Divorce
• Child custody
• Real estate
• Personal injury
• Criminal law
• Free simple will kits
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Financial Consultation

Free consultation on issues such as:
• Debt management
• Tax planning
• Retirement
• Home buying strategies
• College planning
• Credit report coaching
If you have already accessed Claremont EAP services, please take this brief survey to help us evaluate the effectiveness of this resource.
SLUSD Pets of the Month
Ever wonder who is really in charge behind those administrators? Well now you know! Every cloud has a silver lining, and these pets have definitely found it with these powerful people home more often for walks, cuddles and kisses!
If you have a pet that is making sheltering at home more bearable, please forward a photo to communications@slusd.us and share the love!
Find Ways to Connect
Research  shows that people who have the richest social relationships are the happiest; the quality of relationships has even been linked to physical health and longevity. Let people know you care and especially contact those who may be isolated or lonely.
  • Each day, contact one person you haven't spoken to for some time.
  • Use technology like WhatsApp, Facetime, and Zoom to stay in touch.
  • Notice positive qualities in other people (e.g. perseverance, kindness, being hopeful etc) and compliment them on those.
Free Resources for Physical & Mental Health
Don't let cost stop you from keeping yourself engaged and recharged. These are a few of our favorite free classes and resources.
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Ergonomics for Home Work Stations
Your work is important but even more critical right now is the work space you create. Review these quick considerations for setting up a safe, supportive work space to ensure you are staying healthy AND efficient!
How to Contact TSA Consulting Group, Inc. (TSACG)
TSACG is our third party administrator for 403(b) and 457 plans. They help provide administrative, consulting, and IRS compliance services for retirement programs for our employees. If you are an employee and you have a question about your plan, contact TSA directly. Salary Reduction Agreements (SRA's) can be submitted online.  
Build-a-Grain Bowls
The most flexible way to compose a grain bowl is grain + sauce + roasted vegetables + protein + nuts/seeds + leafy greens + something creamy.

Cook 3 batches of whole grains. Favorites include brown rice blends, farro, and quinoa. Make these in the amount that’s right for the size of your household, either on the stove or in a rice cooker. (Or make more; cooked and cooled whole grains freeze well.) Whole grains have fiber, B vitamins, iron, and other minerals that refined grains such as white rice lack.

Make a sheet pan of roasted vegetables. This can be done at the same time you’re prepping your grains. Root vegetables, which keep for a long time, are particularly good for this. Some ideas: Sweet potatoes, parsnips, carrots, turnips, wedges of red onion. Cut into equal-sized chunks (about 2 inches) so they cook evenly, toss with olive oil, salt and pepper, and perhaps a favorite spice, and cook in a hot oven (400 to 425 F) and you’ll be set in 20 minutes.

Prepare your proteins . Most plant-based proteins are pantry staples — think beans, either dried, canned, or frozen; tempeh, tofu, and seitan. Cooking a pot of beans once a week will allow you to use them not only in grain bowls, but as a base for chili, soup, and more. You can also marinate and then pan-fry or bake tempeh or tofu in advance for added flavor and texture. Other healthy, non-plant-based proteins that work well in grain bowls include roasted salmon and grilled or baked chicken.

Nuts and seeds.  These little powerhouses of crunch and nutrition don’t really need to be prepared. However, toasting in a pan over medium heat or in a 350 F oven for 5 to 10 minutes will bring out their crunch and flavor.

Leafy greens.  Whether you eat them raw or cooked, leafy greens are a great way to add fiber, B vitamins, iron, and many minerals including potassium and calcium. You can also stir-fry or braise heartier greens like kale or collards if you prefer your greens cooked.

Something creamy.  This can be cashew cream, sliced avocado, a tahini- or peanut-based dressing, or cheese if you eat dairy. We need some fat in our diets to absorb vitamins A, D, E, and K.
Get Saucy
An important rule of healthy cooking: Never forget flavor! This is where these sauces come in. Make sauce once a week and keep it in the fridge. That's the finishing touch on your grain bowl or other healthy recipe.

Ingredients
Tahini dressing (Makes: 1 cup)
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • Juice of 1 large lemon (about 3 tablespoons juice)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • Water, as needed, to thin

Kale-walnut pesto (Makes: about 1 cup)
  • 1 cup packed kale leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup packed fresh basil leaves
  • 2 tablespoons toasted walnuts
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese or nutritional yeast

Soy-sesame vinaigrette (Makes: about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 chopped green onion
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon toasted white sesame seeds

Peanut sauce (Makes: 3/4 to 1 cup)
  • 4 tablespoons creamy natural peanut butter
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons water, to thin out the sauce, if necessary
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes

Cashew cream (Makes: 1 cup)
  • 1 cup raw cashews, soaked for at least 2 hours, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 to 1 cup water (just enough to almost cover cashews)

Classic vinaigrette (Makes: 3/4 cup)
  • 3 tablespoons vinegar or citrus juice
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional additions: fresh or dried herbs, spices, minced garlic, citrus zest
  • Note: You want a 3:1 ratio of oil to vinegar or acid. 

Directions
  • For Tahini dressing, soy-sesame vinaigrette, or peanut sauce: Whisk all ingredients together.
  • For kale-walnut pesto: Process all together in a food processor.
  • For cashew cream: Blend together in a high-speed blender until it is the consistency of whipped cream.
  • For classic vinaigrette: Shake together in a jar; adjust flavors to taste.
San Leandro Unified School District | communications@slusd.us | www.slusd.us