Hi there!

If you follow the Ohio City Provisions newsletter, you probably have gotten to know Ron by now. Ron is my dad and well known for his affection for spicy foods and his homemade pickled hot peppers and dehydrated pepper flakes (which he keeps in a plastic bag in the glove compartment for emergency pizza stops). 

But Ron also has a sweet tooth, and he has always talked about how good my grandmother's chocolate pie was. I remember it, but I honestly was never a fan. It was a texture thing. It was shiny and wiggly and just tasted like pudding. Well, apparently that's all it was. Chocolate instant pudding in a pie crust. 

I was so disappointed to learn this. I knew we could do better. Well last month when planning the menu for my wedding, Chef Ashley and I were talking about dessert options. I told her the story of the pie and she got right to work.

So for my wedding we offered a lot of desserts, and one of them was a Mexican Chocolate Pie with Toasted Meringue topping. The smooth, rich chocolate custard was infused with some of Ron's famous pepper flakes for a subtle heat. On top, Ashley added an Italian meringue topping, toasted of course.  

The pie was a big hit. I gave my dad one to take home with him. He took it to work to share with his friends. Dale proclaimed, "Ron, this pie has a kick. He should market this. It's awesome!". Dale, enough said. It's for sale now.  

So this week we are excited to introduce the latest farm-made baked goodness - Chocolate Meringue Pie. We know 90% of you aren't into spicy foods, so we are offering the basic version - chocolate, unadulterated by any pepper flakes. For those wanting the full experience, the Mexican chocolate pies will be arriving soon.

-Trevor 

Notes from the Office: Halloween
Next Thursday we will not have our Avon and Mayfield Heights deliveries. If you pick up at either of these locations please plan to pick up your bag at another stop. You are welcome to pick up at the Beachwood or Westlake stops earlier in the evening. Special orders for these stops will be on the Beachwood or Westlake trucks unless otherwise specified.
Down on the Farm
With frost upon us, grazers must be careful. Frost causes certain forages to change their chemical structure. Sorghum and sorghum-sudan grasses, which aren't very prominent around here, are notoriously dangerous for producing prussic acid - a form of cyanide - which can kill cattle within minutes. The grazer must wait for the grass to dry out, a week or two, or harvest it for hay before giving it to cattle. 

Legumes like white clover, red clover, and alfalfa are much more common in pasture mixes and hay fields. However, pastures too rich in legumes are always at risk for what is called "bloat." Bloat in layman's terms is a stomach ache where the cow can't burp or fart. The gasses then build up in the rumen - the bovine fermentation tank - eventually making the animal swell up, putting pressure on the lungs. Eventually, the cow can't breath and dies.  

Yeah, it's scary stuff. Generally, bloat is of greatest concern in the spring when the beef cows go from poorer quality winter forage to extremely rich spring grasses. As the summer progresses, their bodies become used to this diet and the risk is minimized. 

But by fall, the grasses and legumes don't grow back as fast, and as we try to stretch the grazing season the cattle are grazing younger and more tender forage. This is also the highest protein forage. Then, a frost will change the way the plant is digested. The cell walls break or weaken, making certain minerals more rapidly available. Minerals like potassium and calcium and manganese, all which in excess can contribute to bloat. 

Each day as we move the beef we cross our fingers. They want to eat the very rich stuff. So what else can we do? We add dry hay and give them very little fresh pasture in the morning. By lunch, the frost has burnt off and hopefully their bellies are full of roughage. They can then more safely graze the rich, young growth in the pasture.  
WINTER SHARE COUNTDOWN:2 WEEKS
The Winter Share starts the week after Summer ends -- first pickup is November 6 - 9.

More information available on our website
Winter Share Bag Contents Over The Years

BAG CONTENTS
THE MINI
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Acorn Squash
Spinach
Broccoli 
Apples  






SMALL OMNIVORE
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Acorn Squash
Spinach
Broccoli 
Apples
Ground Chicken
 





LARGE OMNIVORE
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Acorn Squash
Spinach
Broccoli 
Apples
Ground Chicken
Chicken Stock
Celery
Chicken Thighs


SMALL VEGETARIAN
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Acorn Squash
Spinach
Broccoli 
Apples
Carrots
Brussel Sprouts

LARGE VEGETARIAN
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Acorn Squash
Spinach
Broccoli 
Apples
Carrots
Brussel Sprouts
Celery
Eggs
Cheese

VEGAN
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Acorn Squash
Spinach
Broccoli 
Apples
Carrots
Brussel Sprouts

RECIPES
OUR FAMILY OF COMPANIES