• Oregon Health Authority's most recent weekly report, published December 9, details our ongoing Covid-19 surge
  • OHA recorded 10,355 new cases of COVID-19 infection—a 14% increase over last week’s tally and the 7th consecutive week of record highs
  • Rising case counts are outrunning the ability of Oregon’s local public health authorities to investigate and identify sources of infection
  • Four hundred ninety-four patients with COVID-19 were hospitalized last week—an average of 70 per day; and 133 Oregonians died in association with COVID-19—up from 86 the previous week and an average of 19 per day.

  • By month’s end, Oregon should be receiving 147,000 Covid-19 vaccine doses — enough to vaccinate about 73,000 people (each person requires two doses). One hundred thousand Oregonians should be receiving their first dose by the end of 2020. Frontline healthcare workers, those living in long-term care facilities, essential workers like janitors and food service workers, and those in outpatient medical facilities will be in the first wave of people receiving vaccines.

  • Oregon Health Authority's director cautions that ending the pandemic will still take time. “This is truly an historic moment that we should celebrate,” said Patrick Allen, OHA director. “But we’re far from being out of the woods in this pandemic. For most of us, getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is several months away, and in that time we will see more cases and, tragically, more deaths. Everyone should have the opportunity to get the vaccine when it becomes available, so we need to keep doing our part to protect our families, our neighbors and ourselves by doubling down on the basic actions that keep the virus from spreading.”

  • During the governor’s December 11 press briefing, Dr. Dean Sidelinger pointed out that Oregon saw a decrease in people’s movement before Thanksgiving. A national survey showed that Oregon had a high percentage of people who reported they were going to spend the holiday with only members of their household. These decisions likely slowed the increase in cases, he said. If Oregonians continue to limit their risks and steer clear of gatherings, we may reduce the expected rapid rise in cases this holiday season.