May 14, 2021
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After a year of working from home, journalists and communicators around the country are hitting reset on their routines as they consider life after vaccination. Add “Pro Tips: Writing refresh” to your toolkit as you reset.

In this 3-hour workshop, we’ll get you motivated with:
  • Tips on energizing tired writing
  • Structuring stories with inclusivity at their core
  • Writing killer headlines that attract, rather than distract

Registration is open for this program, which will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. ET Friday, June 4, on Zoom. Tickets are $50 for general participants and $40 for National Press Club members.

Session spotlight: Re-energize your writing ... and your love for it (1-2 p.m., Steve Padilla)

If the circumstances of 2020 — and the year to date — have left your creative reserves drained, you’re not alone. Re-energize how you view writing — and the way you do it — in this session for nonfiction writers.

Writing coach and Los Angeles Times Column One Editor Steve Padilla will guide you out of your writing ruts with sentence-level, achievable techniques to invigorate your writing. Designed for professional nonfiction writers, Padilla’s workshop will give you fresh ways to:
  • Craft descriptions
  • Construct anecdotes
  • Trim and squeeze your copy
  • Troubleshoot your writing
  • Collaborate with editors

Strengthen your technique while gaining practical tips that work for long-form stories as well as quick dailies.

Steve Padilla, who taught standing-room-only participants during the Institute’s Pro Tips writing workshop at the Press Club in 2019, is editor of Column One, the L.A. Times’ showcase for storytelling. He tweets about writing technique at @StevePadilla2.
You’ve assembled a good team. So ... why aren’t they getting along? Good teams are made up of talented individuals with unique experiences, work habits, and needs. A great team, though, is driven by a leader that celebrates each team member for who they are while nudging all toward the collective goals.

When personalities seem like they are polar opposites, good leaders rely on clear, consistent communication about the expectations, collaboration, and values that anchor the important work being done. Often, bringing your team back to the “why” and “what” can help them look past the “how.”

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago, Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership

Journalists believe that more facts get us closer to the truth, and that the way to make society stronger is by spotlighting what’s wrong. Many Americans disagree. New research shows us how to adjust our mix of stories, reframe our coverage, and write headlines to reach people who don’t fully embrace journalism values.

Join us Tuesday, May 25 from 1 to 2 p.m. ET for a National Press Club Headliners virtual event to learn new ways to build trust with the communities your journalism is failing to reach. 

Speakers include:
  • Jennifer Benz, vice president, NORC at the University of Chicago
  • Tom Huang, assistant managing editor for journalism initiatives, The Dallas Morning News
  • Tom Rosenstiel, executive director, American Press Institute
  • Emily Swanson, director of public opinion research, The Associated Press

Lisa Nicole Matthews, assignment manager of U.S. video for the Associated Press and the 114th president of the National Press Club, will moderate the panel.

Registration is open for this one-hour program, jointly produced by the National Press Club Journalism Institute and the National Press Club. The program will stream live on the websites of the Institute and Press Club, and on the Press Club’s YouTube Channel. It is accessible to the press and public at no cost, but registration is required.

Viewers can email their questions in advance or during the live program to Headliners@press.org, with “Trust” in the subject line.
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This newsletter is written & edited by the National Press Club Journalism Institute staff: Beth Francesco, Holly Butcher Grant and Julie Moos. Send us your questions and suggestions for topics to cover.

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