Department of Youth Services' Newsletter
January 2021 Edition |
DYS FY20 Annual Report DYS Advisory Committee
The Department of Youth Services has recently published their Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Report. Please click on the picture to see the full report.
The Department of Youth Services’ Advisory Committee held its inaugural meeting on December 15, 2020. Click on image to view what the committee will be working on and DYS Advisory Members.
DYS 2020 Recidivism Report
The Department of Youth Services' has released the 2020 Recidivism Report. In this report, DYS Research staff analyzed the criminal histories of 349 youth, formerly committed to the DYS custody and discharged from the agency during 2016. The chart pictured to the right, shows a breakdown of the one year reconviction rates based on Gender, Ethnicity, DYS Committing Offense Type, and by Grid Level. Recidivism as used in the Report is defined as a conviction in the adult system for an offense committed within one year of discharge from DYS' custody.

The report indicated that there were 11 key findings:
  1. In the current study, the overall one-year reconviction rate was 25%
  2. The recidivism rate for males was 29% while the rate for females was 2%.
  3. Youth whose first arraignment was before age 14 had a recidivism rate of 27% while those whose first arraignment was at 14 or older had a rate of 24%.
  4. Youth with fewer than 5 juvenile arraignments had a recidivism rate of 18%. Those with 10 or more juvenile arraignments had a rate of 39%.
  5. Youth committing 3 or more assaults while in juvenile facilities had a recidivism rate of 41%. Those committing no assaults had a rate of only 20%.
  6. Youth earning a high school diploma or equivalency prior to DYS discharge had a recidivism rate of 23%. Youth without a diploma or equivalency had a rate of 26%.
  7. Youth whose DYS committing offenses were felonies had a recidivism rate of 29% while those committed on misdemeanors had a rate of 21%.
  8. Youth who opted for YES services following DYS discharge had a recidivism rate of 21% while youth not opting for those services had a rate of 29%.
  9. On the PTSD Screen, youth strongly agreeing with the statement ‘If someone pushes me too far, I am likely to become violent’ were convicted at a 30% rate. All others had a rate of 24%. Youth strongly agreeing with the statement ‘I have trouble concentrating on tasks’ were convicted at a 34% rate. All others had a rate of 24%. Youth agreeing with the statement ‘I enjoy the company of others’ were convicted at a 24% rate. All others had a rate of 32%.
  10. Eight protective factors were identified that were associated with lower recidivism: (1) First arraignment at age 14 or older; (2) Less than 5 juvenile arraignments; (3) No assaults in residential facilities while committed; (4) More than 6 months of YES services; (5) Earning a high school diploma or equivalency prior to discharge; (6) Scoring in the low to middle ranges on the Level of Service Inventory (see page 21); (7) Disagreeing with the statement ‘If someone pushes me too far, I am likely to become violent’ on the PTSD Screen; and (8) Agreeing with the statement ‘I enjoy the company of others’ on the PTSD Screen.
  11. The number of protective factors was calculated for each youth in the sample. Those with less than 2 protective factors had a 46% recidivism rate. As more protective factors were added on, recidivism rates decreased. Youth with 6 or more protective factors had a recidivism rate of only 13%.

The recidivism literature identified 8 protective factors, listed above, which are associated with lower juvenile recidivism. Among them are low institutional misconduct; constructive use of leisure time; current employment; little or no use of alcohol or drugs; and involvement in school (Baglivio et al.). The number of protective factors was calculated for each youth in the sample. Those with less than 2 protective factors had a 46% recidivism rate. As more protective factors were added on, recidivism rates decreased. Youth with 6 or more protective factors had a recidivism rate of only 13%. 
Data Matters:
A further dive into the Recidivism Report Data
Figure 1 and Figure 9 were taken directly from the Recidivism Report (linked above). Figure 1 compared the one-year recidivism rates from 2007 to 2016 based on whether the youth were arraigned, convicted, or incarcerated. Figure 9 gives a breakdown of the 2016 recidivism results by region.
Highlighted Articles
A Healthier You in 2021 - A Brand-New Start, But Not the Same Old Resolution

Please click on image below for the full article on nutrition written by WaiLing Balsley
A Community Operations Update throughout the regions
by Becki Moore, DYS Director of Community Operations

Happy New Year! I hope all of you reading this are holding up okay. I thank you for all that you are doing for DYS youth and their families as we manage through this pandemic – both professionally and personally. 

Since the onset of this crisis back in March, I have regularly (not surprisingly) been impressed with the innovative and creative ways community teams have been supporting and engaging with youth and families. Here are just a few highlights from all of the amazing work our staff in the community – both state and provider – have been up to!....
The Department of Youth Service Mourns the Loss of a Valued Employee
It is with great sadness that we inform our DYS community that Eliot Treatment Program Supervisor Terrance Talley passed away on January 1st, 2021 while working the 1st shift.

January 1st was the start of a new year and hopes for a new beginning. Staff at the Connelly Building were working with the youth in the programs when a co-worker, Terrance Talley, Program Supervisor, unexpectedly collapsed on the floor. Youth and staff instinctively jumped into action, including Ivair who applied CPR. Regrettably, Mr. Talley did not make it.

This loss is devastating for our DYS family. We encourage our staff and youth to keep Mr. Talley’s memory alive. And we want to thank the staff and youth for their heroic efforts in the face of this extremely traumatizing event.