This week we are diving into resources about water . This week's email is the final installment of Thinking in Place. Thank you for exploring digital humanities resources with us for the past 14 weeks! Our monthly e-newsletters will be reformatted to include some elements from Thinking in Place so stay tuned.

SC Humanities, in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum on Main Street program, is pleased to present the traveling Smithsonian exhibit  Water/Ways  in South Carolina . Thanks to support from Dominion Energy, Water/Ways  will tour six small communities in South Carolina from June 2020 to April 2021. The exhibit will have i ts public opening in South Carolina at  Hickory Knob State Park , hosted by the McCormick County Chamber of Commerce, on Saturday, June 27. 

Pamela L. Martin , the state scholar for Water/Ways , joins us this week to offer a book recommendation. Pamela is a Professor in the Department of Politics at Coastal Carolina University and the Executive Director for Georgetown RISE, a United Nations RCE for Sustainable Development.
Book Drop with Pam Martin
Somerville, Margaret. 2020. Riverlands of the Anthropocene: Walking our Waterways as Places of Becoming . London and New York: Routledge.
Margaret Somerville’s walk along the riverlands of Western Sydney, Australia connects us all to the timelessness of the river’s edge and the mixing of old and new worlds we confront when we venture onto riparian shores. Just as the river changes the soil and rock beds, Somerville reminds us that we too “become” when we sit in stillness to notice the waterways around us. And, as the rivers change, they also offer a stillness and peace within the chaos of our Earth, particularly during times of COVID and social unrest. With a mix of the science of rivers and how humanity is part of that fluid system, the reader becomes enmeshed by the rivers and their connections well beyond ourselves to the greater planet around us.

South Carolina waterways offer many of us peace and release during our current challenges, but also speak to us of the heritage and past from Native American tribes to the vast changes to their banks by the hands of slaves for rice production. Rivers are the subjects of our culture, our music, the source of our foods, a means of transportation, and a respite for many today. Rivers and their wetlands provide buffers from flooding during storms and hurricanes, and they alert us to the impacts of new development to their/our health. 

Riverlands of the Anthropocene is the perfect read to encourage us all to get lost in the flow of the river and experience its boundless sense of time. Through personal experiences, poetry, and ecological analysis, Somerville weaves the story of rivers into something deeper: a search for hope amidst the time of the Anthropocene, when so much seems to be changing, and a reminder that we are all connected to something larger. As you visit the Waterways exhibit this summer and throughout the next year, bring along a copy of Riverlands and get lost in the waters edge. 

Pamela L. Martin, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Politics at Coastal Carolina University and the Executive Director for Georgetown RISE, a United Nations RCE for Sustainable Development. Martin is serving as the State Scholar for Water/Ways , a Smithsonian exhibit touring 6 small communities in South Carolina from 2020-2021.
The Smithsonian’s  Water/Ways  exhibition dives into water–an essential component of life on our planet, environmentally, culturally, and historically. 

Water/Ways  will tour six small communities in South Carolina from June 2020 to April 2021. The exhibit will have its public opening in South Carolina at  Hickory Knob State Park , hosted by the McCormick County Chamber of Commerce, on Saturday, June 27 .
Water/Ways  is a part of  Museum on Main Street , a unique collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), state humanities councils across the nation, and local host institutions. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the U.S. Congress. Support for the South Carolina tour of  Water/Ways  has been provided by Dominion Energy
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