July 20, 2020
Provided by the American Dairy Science Association® (ADSA®) in cooperation with Feedstuffs. If you received this issue of ADSA Dair-e-news from a friend and would like to receive your personal copy in the future, please contact keolson@prodigy.net

Opinion and editorial content included in the Dair-e-news represent the views of the authors. Publication does not represent endorsement of any position by the ADSA. Depending on your email preview settings, all text may not be visible. If you find that to be the case, simply click to open the email or use the link at the top to open the web version. 

 Ken Olson, Ph: 630-237-4961,  keolson@prodigy.net
News
Final report for dietary guidelines issued
The U.S. Department of Agriculture posted the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s (DGAC) final scientific report, an objective review of the latest science available on specific nutrition topics. The report’s evidence-based findings will inform USDA and the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services as they co-develop the 2020-25 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which will provide recommendations on what to eat and drink to promote health and prevent chronic disease.
CubicFarms attracts $1.16m investment
CubicFarm Systems Corp. announced a non-brokered private placement with Harry DeWit and company insiders, for gross proceeds of up to $1.162 million.

Insiders participating in the offering include chairman Jeff Booth, chief operating officer Rodrigo Santana and chief financial officer Tim Fernback.

Dairy checkoff, Taco Bell launch new menu items
A partnership between the dairy checkoff and Taco Bell has once again paid off. The restaurant recently launched two new menu items that contain real dairy: the Grilled Cheese Burrito and a Pineapple Whip Freeze beverage.

ADSA News and Happenings


ADSA Elects Dairy Foods and Production Division Council Leadership
ADSA is pleased to share the election results of recent elections in its two divisions – the Production Division and the Dairy Foods Division. Thank you to all members who participated in the business meetings of the two divisions last week. If you are not a member, and wish to become involved, please  click here for information about membership .

The Production Division Council Elections results are:
  • Secretary/Treasurer: Pedram Rezamand, University of Idaho
  • Director: Robin White, Virginia Tech

The Dairy Foods Division Council Elections results are:
  • Secretary/Treasurer: Nicole Martin, Cornell University
  • Member-At-Large: Guillaume Brisson, Laval University

These new leaders join the ranks of the existing council members for the 2020-2021 year. The 2020-2021 council leadership is as follows:

2020-2021 Production Division Council
  • Chair: Trevor DeVries, University of Guelph
  • Vice Chair: Corwin Nelson, University of Florida
  • Secretary/Treasurer: Pedram Rezamand, University of Idaho
  • Director: Guillermo Schroeder, Cargill Animal Nutrition
  • Director: Mike Steele, University of Guelph
  • Director: Robin White, Virginia Tech
  • Board Liaison: Xin Zhao, McGill University

2020 – 2021 Dairy Foods Division Council
  • Chair: Rani Govindasamy-Lucey, Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research
  • Vice Chair: Sam Alcaine, Cornell University
  • Secretary/Treasurer: Nicole Martin, Cornell University
  • Member-At-Large: Rohit Kapoor, Dairy Management, Inc.
  • Member-At-Large: Haotian Zheng, Cal Poly State University
  • Member-At-Large: Guillaume Brisson, Laval University
  • Board Liaison: Rohit Kapoor, Dairy Management, Inc. 
Congratulations to the Council Leaders for the coming year!


ADSA® Develops the Next
Generation of Leaders        
Developing the next generation of leaders for the dairy industry is an important objective for the American Dairy Science Association® (ADSA). ADSA sponsors programs for challenging and developing youth for leadership responsibilities. To accomplish this objective, ADSA leans on its student divisions including the Graduate Student Division (GSD) and Student Affiliate Division (SAD).  Both focus on career development, professional growth and leadership development for their members.

In addition to organizational meetings and research presentations, several student activities were included in the recent ADSA Virtual Annual Meeting that encouraged networking and professional development for students.

Bethany Dado-Senn, 2019-2020 President of the GSD, and Jack Myers, 2019-2020 President of the SAD, provided some thoughts on these leadership development activities and networking opportunities that were available through ADSA.

Bethany Dado-Senn shared:
“The Graduate Student Division advisory council was very pleased with student participation in all aspects of the meeting, particularly in research dissemination through virtual abstracts as well as engagement in our career development opportunities. Over 140 students interacted with professional members through two Mix and Mingle sessions and a Career Insights Panel, where we gained valuable insights on areas such as career preparedness, professional and personal commitments, time and team management, and job seeking during a pandemic. Our attendees enjoyed interacting and learning from these professional members, while student-to-student conversations were also facilitated via the chat feature.

The GSD would like to acknowledge the continuous support of ADSA professional members in graduate student endeavors. It was apparent in both the planning and execution of this virtual meeting that student research and professional development were key priorities for ADSA leadership. We also thank professional members who contributed to our GSD events for their time and advice. We hope we can continue to foster these virtual relationships and eventually continue our in-person networking when possible.”

Jack Myers shared:
“SAD Mentoring Sessions: The move to virtual for the SAD mentoring sessions, still provided the same experience and networking opportunities as if we were on site. Professional ADSA members were still able to meet with SAD members and provide valuable advice ranging from graduate school, analyzing posters, and providing specific science based knowledge.

SAD Career Roundtable: While taking a different form this year, the SAD career roundtable featured four panelists consisting of a nutritionist, dairy consultant, extension agent, and a graduate student. Members were able to ask questions in the zoom chat feature and discussion was moderated by SAD officers. SAD members were provided with valuable advice regarding careers in the dairy industry and how the dairy industry is coping with the covid pandemic.

SAD members were also able to enjoy a social night where three small groups of students interacted with virtual game hosts to play a wide variety of games, all while networking with other students.
Overall, SAD members were still able to enjoy nearly all of their typical programming, with only a few minor virtual hiccups. ADSA was yet again able to provide key programming for SAD members, giving them opportunities to network with fellow members and the science presented at the annual meeting. All aiding SAD members as they pursue graduate school or careers in the industry.”
ADSA looks forward to the next generation of scientists and industry leaders present in the GSD and SAD membership and to supporting students in their careers as Professional Members of ADSA in the future.


Heat stress in gestating dairy cows impairs performance of future generations

Research in the Journal of Dairy Science ® studies lasting effects of heat stress on dairy cows

It is estimated that in the United States, environmental heat stress in cows costs the dairy industry more than $1.5 billion annually due to decreased milk production, impaired reproductive performance, increased rates of illness, and shortened lifespans. But what effects do heat stress in pregnant cows have on the productivity and health of their female offspring in the future, and how much might this affect dairy producers’ costs? In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science , scientists from the University of Florida and the University of California, Davis investigated the performance and profitability of two future generations of cows born to mothers exposed to heat stress during pregnancy.

According to senior author Jimena Laporta, PhD, of the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA, previous research has found that heifers born to cows that are heat-stressed during late gestation grow to be smaller and produce on average five kilograms per day less milk in their first lactation, compared with heifers born to dams that were cooled during the hottest days of the year.

“This suggests a permanent effect of fetal environment on genetic expression in adulthood,” said Laporta. “We hypothesized that exposure of pregnant cows to heat stress during late gestation will impair daughters’ and granddaughters’ lifetime performances.”

The authors’ first objective was to measure the carryover effects of maternal exposure to heat stress during late gestation on milk yield, reproductive performance, and survival rates of daughters and granddaughters. Their second was to estimate the economic losses related to those outcomes across the United States. Laporta and colleagues pooled and analyzed data collected over a 10-year period on performance of Holstein cows in Florida, the state with the greatest number of heat stress days per year. This gave them information on the lifespans, productivity, and reproductive performance of two successive generations of cows born to dams exposed to heat stress during pregnancy and those born to dams that were provided active cooling during heat stress periods.

The authors found that, as expected, daughters and granddaughters of heat-stressed cows showed negative effects in rates of survival from birth to first calving, length of productive lifespan, and milk performance, including milk yields and nutrient contents through the first three lactations. The team calculated that these impairments translate to considerable annual costs to dairy producers in the United States, with nationwide losses, based on the US average milk price from 2010 to 2015, of up to $595 million annually.

Laporta notes that lactating cows tend to be the focus of heat reduction strategies, possibly because the effects of overheating are more immediately evident among them than among nonlactating pregnant cows, for which the damage may become apparent only later, when they resume milking. But considering the hidden costs that carry over to future generations of cows and the likelihood of increased heat stress due to ongoing climate change, Laporta and colleagues consider cooling techniques for dry cows—such as the use of fans and sprinkler systems—crucial to the continued success of the US dairy industry.

Cheese making relies on milk
proteins to form structure

Protein composition of milk affects coagulation and consequently cheese yield according to a study in the Journal of Dairy Science ®

Cheese production relies on coagulation of milk proteins into a gel matrix after addition of rennet. Milk that does not coagulate (NC) under optimal conditions affects the manufacturing process, requiring a longer processing time and lowering the cheese yield, which, in turn, has economic impact. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science , scientists from Lund University studied the protein composition of milk samples with different coagulation properties to learn more about why only some milk coagulates with rennet.

The authors of this study analyzed protein composition in NC and coagulating milk samples from 616 Swedish Red cows. They reported that the relative concentrations, genetic variants, and posttranslational modifications of the proteins all contribute to whether rennet could induce coagulation in each sample. The NC milk had higher relative concentrations of α-lactalbumin and ß-casein and lower relative concentrations of ß-lactoglobulin and κ-casein when compared with coagulating milk.
 
“The non-coagulating characteristics of milk relate to protein composition and genetic variants of the milk proteins,” said first author Kajsa Nilsson, PhD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. “Roughly 18 percent of Swedish Red cows produce noncoagulating milk, which is a high prevalence. Cheese-producing dairies would benefit from eliminating the NC milk from their processes, and breeding could reduce or remove this milk trait,” said Nilsson.

These results can be used to further understand the mechanisms behind NC milk, develop breeding strategies to reduce this milk trait, and limit use of NC milk for cheese processing.

One more reminder from the 2020 ADSA Virtual Annual Meeting , as an added benefit to the meeting everyone who registered for the meeting has received 90 days of complementary access to S-PAC. If you were not a subscriber prior to the meeting simply go to https://spac.adsa.org/ ., use the same login and password that you did to register for the meeting and you will have access to S-PAC. .Please note, the abstracts from the 2020 meeting are now posted and available on S-PAC. It is one more great reason to check out the power of S-PAC.
The Transition Period
– From Physiology to Management October 26-29, 2020
Eaglewood Resort & Spa

The 39th ADSA Discover Conference will focus on scientific advancements made in the last 10 years and feature discussion of unanswered questions and controversies about the transition period. Small group discussions will be woven into the program, including focused discussions with the speakers. The program will bridge from the fundamental science to its application.

Conference Topics include:
• Physiology
• Inflammation and Immune Function
• Management and Feeding
• Monitoring and Analysis
• Health

Registration postmarked by September 28, 2020 is $375 for ADSAARPAS members and $425 for non-members, which includes sessions and most meals. After September 28, the registration fee will be $475 member/$525 non-member. Registration will be accepted on an availability basis. Your registration includes 90 days free access to the Searchable Proceedings of Animal Conferences (S-PA C). 

NASEM Nutrient Requirements
of Dairy Cattle
June 1-4, 2021
Eaglewood Resort & Spa

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM, previously known as NRC) anticipates the 2021 release the 8th revised edition of the “Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle”, the world’s most highly cited reference on dairy cattle feeding.

This  40 th  Discover Conference  will focus on the scientific advancements in dairy cattle feeding used in revising the 2001 edition. NASEM subcommittee members will address the substantive changes in the nutrient requirements and the conceptual approaches used to make those changes. They will report on areas with significant knowledge gaps that still prevent more accurate prediction of the nutrient requirements. We will emphasize the interactive spirit of Discover conferences with structured small group discussions woven into the program, including a demonstration of the software and focused discussions with the speakers. The program will bridge from the fundamental science to applied dairy cattle feeding:

Conference Topics Include:
·        Feed Intake, Fats, Carbohydrates and Energy
·        Proteins and Amino Acids
·        Minerals, Vitamins and Water
·        Dry Cows, Calves and Replacement Heifers
·        Application of the New Requirements

Registration postmarked by April 30, 2021 is $375 for ADSA-ARPAS members and $425 for non-members, which includes sessions and most meals. After April 30, the registration fee will be $475 member/$525 non-member. Registration will be accepted on an availability basis. Your registration includes 90 days free access to the Searchable Proceedings of Animal Conferences (S-PAC). .

Health Management of Calves: From Intrauterine Life to Successful Weaning

Start making plans to attend the 41ST ADSA DISCOVER CONFERENCE SM  ON FOOD ANIMAL AGRICULTURE - Health Management of Calves: From Intrauterine Life to Successful Weaning. This conference will explore the many changes in dairy calf management practices, and research conducted over the last decade. A poster session will be included to allow participants to share and discuss research findings. Details will be posted on the meeting site as they are finalized. 
ADSA® on Linked In continues to Grow – Are you included?
Our ADSA Linked In group now includes 1,754 members from around the world, are you one of them? It’s a great place to get information about ADSA and industry activities as well as to network with other dairy professionals from around the world.  Check it out here.

While on “Linked In” check out the ADSA Graduate Student Division (GSD) as well. You can find their page at https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12059336/profile
Calendar
IN LIGHT OF THE COVID-19 SITUATION PLEASE CHECK DIRECTLY WITH CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS ON STATUS OF ANY CONFERENCE YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ATTENDING.

July 20-23, 2020  Certified Milk Inspectors School, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

July 27-31, 2020 ADPI/ABI Joint Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Downtown, Chicago, IL. For complete event information and registration, click here https://www.eventsquid.com/event/8724  - WILL NOW BE A VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

Aug 4-5, 2020 Mid-South Ruminant Nutrition Conference, Embassy Suites DFW North-Outdoor World, Grapevine, TX. Click here for more information and registration. 
Aug 11-12, 2020  The Science of Yogurt (Basic Level), Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Aug 12-14-, 2020 Membrane Technology Forum, Marriott City Center, Minneapolis, Minn. Click here for more information
Aug 17-18, 2020  Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP), Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Aug 19-20, 2020  Implementing SQF Systems, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Aug 21, 2020     SQF Quality Systems, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration 
    
Aug 26-27, 2020 Dairy Science and Sanitation, Ithaca, NY. Click here for Registration.
Aug 31 - Sept 4, 2020   71 st  Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP), Porto, Portugal, for registration and more information click here .

Sept 1-2, 2020  Fluid Milk Processing for Quality and Safety, Ithaca, NY. Click here for Registraction.
Sept 1-3, 2020  Preventive Controls for Human Food, Brooklyn, NY, Click here for Registration

Sept 2, 2020 1:00-5:00 PM CDT  CDR Certificate in Dairy Processing online course. Click here for information and registration
Sept 3-4, 2020  Leadership Skills for Success, Ithaca, NY. Click here for Registration.
Sept 10, 2020 2:00 PM CDT NMC webinar: "Milking Procedures for Optimal Milk Quality and Milk Harvest." Click here to register.

Sept 15-17, 2020  Preventive Controls for Human Foods - Dairy Foods Processing, Penn State University, Room 252, Erickson Food Science Building, University Park, PA. For registration and more information click here .

Sept 22-24, 2020   Cultured Dairy Products Short Course, Erickson Food Science Building, Penn State University Park Campus, For information and registration visit :  https://agsci.psu.edu/cultured-dairy

Sept 29-30, 2020  Membrane Filtration, Drying, and Evaporation, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Sept 29-Oct 3, 2020     World Dairy Expo, Alliant Energy Center - Madison, WI, For more information click here .-  CANCELED

October 11 - 13, 2020 22 nd  Dairy Ingredients Technical Symposium, Hilton Beachfront Resort Hotel, Santa Barbara, CA. For more information, visit  www.adpi.org

Oct 13-15, 2020  High Temperature Short Time Pasteurizer, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Oct 13-15, 2020  17th International Annual Symposium on Milk Science and Health University of California Davis, Davis CA. Click here for details

Oct 20, 2020     Vat Pasteurizer, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Oct 20 - 22, 2020   2020 Cornell Nutrition Conference*, Syracuse, NY, For more information click here

Oct 21-22, 2020  The Science of Cheese (Basic Level), Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration 
 
Oct 26-29, 2020   39th ADSA Discover Conference -The Transition Period - From Physiology to Management, Eaglewood Resort & Spa, for registration and nore information click here

Oct 27-28, 2020  The Science of Cheese (Advanced Level), Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  

Oct 27-29, 2020   Pasteurizer Operations Workshop, Erickson Food Science Building, Penn State University, Click here for more information

Nov. 1-4, 2020  Symposium on Gut Health in Production of Food Animals, St. Louis, MO, Click here for details.

Nov 9-12, 2020 7:45 AM-3:00 PM The Science and Art of Cheese Making Short Course, Rodney A. Erickson Food Science Building, PSU, University Park, PA. Click here for registration and more information.
Nov 10-11, 2020  Pathogen Environmental Monitoring, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration 
 
Nov. 11-12, 2020.   Penn State Dairy Cattle Nutrition Workshop*, Hershey, PA., Click here for more information

Dec 1-2, 2020 Introduction to Artisan Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts *NEW DATES*, Ithaca, NY. Click here for Registration
Dec 8-10, 2020  Preventive Controls for Human Food, Ithaca, NY, Click here for Registration  
Jan. 25-28, 2021 NMC 60th Annual Meeting, Town & Country Resort & Convention Center, San Diego, CA Click here for regisration.

April 19-21, 2021 Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Conference, Grand Wayne Center, Ft. Wayne, IN. Click here for more information

June 1-4, 2021 40th ADSA Discover Conference - 2021 Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cows, Eaglewood Resort & Spa. For Registration and more information, click here .

June 9-10, 2021 Four-State Dairy Nutrition & Management Conference Grand River Center, Dubuque, IA. Click here for more information.

July 11-14, 2021 ADSA Annual Meeting, Louisville, KY. Click here for more information.

Aug 30 - Sept 3, 2021  72nd Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP). Davos, Switzerland, For registration and more information click here,

Sept. 28-Oct. 2, 2021 World Dairy Expo World Dairy Expo, Alliant Energy Center - Madison, WI.

*An S-PAC Partner Conference

If your organization's conference isn't among the ever growing list that contribute proceedings and presentations to S-PAC®, ask your conference organizer to contact Ken Olson for more information about the benefits of participation.

If you would like to have an event included in the "Dates to Note," please contact Ken Olson .
Thanks to our Corporate Sustaining Members
We appreciate your ongoing support of ADSA and the  Journal of Dairy Science ®

Ag Processing Inc.
ANDHIL LLC
Arm & Hammer Animal Nutrition & Food Production
Darling Ingredients Inc.
Diamond V
Elanco Animal Health
Global Agri-Trade Corporation
Grande Cheese Company
Lallemand Animal Nutrition
Pioneer
Quali Tech, Inc.
Renaissance Nutrition Inc.
Zinpro
Zoetis
Zook Nutrition & Management Inc.
ADSA Membership Benefits
          
Did you know that your ADSA Professional Membership, which is the least expensive of all national animal-related professional societies, includes all of the following benefits with no additional fees, charges or suggested donations?

*        Electronic access to the Journal of Dairy Science®
*     ADSA Annual Meeting registration at reduced member rates
*        Discover Conference registration at reduced member rates
*   Large Dairy Herd Management 3rd edition e-book at reduced member rates
*        S-PAC: Free access to ADSA Annual Meeting, past JAM and ADSA divisional abstracts
*        S-PAC subscription at reduced member rates
*   A strong voice of advocacy for the animal sciences, animal agriculture and research
*        Access to ADSA's large and growing recorded symposia library    
*        ADSA News (semi-annual association newsletter)
*        ADSA Dair e-news (ADSA weekly industry newsletter)
*        Access to member directory
*        Peer recognition through ADSA, Foundation and Sponsored Award Program
*        Discounted page charges in Journal of Dairy Science®
*        Broad author recognition through ADSA/Elsevier press release program
*        Linked In and You Tube sites for ADSA
*        Quality networking with academic, government and industry professionals
*        Travel awards for all graduate students attending Discover Conferences
*        Opportunity to serve peers via committee and officer positions
 
For more information on your benefits, please visit: http://www.adsa.org/join.asp
To join now and gain these member benefits, visit: http://www.adsa.org/join.asp
American Dairy Science Association
1800 South Oak St., Suite 100, Champaign, IL 61820