Friday, Nov. 5, 2021
Tifton, Georgia
GrapeNew
TIFT WON'T APPEAL MOVE TO CLASS 6A FOR ATHLETICS
By FRANK SAYLES JR.
Tifton Grapevine
Tift County High School's athletic director says the school does not plan to appeal its reclassification to 6A, dropping a level below the state's largest classification for athletic competition.

When contacted Thursday, Tift County High Athletic Director Chris Martin told the Tifton Grapevine that "at this time, we do not plan any appeal. Until the numbers are finalized, we do not have any further comment."

The Georgia High School Association (GHSA) this week announced reclassifications of schools for the next two academic years, moving Tift County High to Class 6A; previously, Tift has been in the state's largest classification of 7A.

The move affects all team sports. The GHSA Reclassification Committee will hear appeals on Nov. 10 regarding placement and requests of schools to play in a higher classification. 

The classifications will be finalized following all appeals. Some schools could be moved to other regions based upon where everything stands after the appeals.

Thomas County Central moves up to 6A, joining Tift County. Valdosta High leaves 6A and is back up in Class 7A, where Lowndes and Colquitt County remain.

The schools are classified based upon their student populations with an added multiplier based upon their number of students from outside their districts.

The GHSA said the reclassifications are designed to maintain a competitive balance among schools throughout the state.
TIFTON AND ALCOHOL:
A LONG, STRANGE TRIP
By FRANK SAYLES JR.
Tifton Grapevine
Tifton has a complicated, controversial history with alcohol, so it was somewhat surprising that voters, without much public comment, on Tuesday approved the referendum allowing the city to issue licenses for the package sale of liquor.

”Never thought I'd see the day,” one person said on social media after the vote.

Tuesday's referendum was approved 661 to 258 with 10% of registered voters in the city casting ballots. Tifton officials say that the city has been losing revenue for decades as city residents have had to travel to other counties and communities in order to purchase distilled spirits from stores.

Tifton did not allow liquor by the drink in restaurants until 2004 and not on Sundays until 2013. There was organized opposition to both measures. In fact, proposals to allow liquor sales in Titon had previously faced fierce opposition and had been defeated for decades, including in 1996 and 1976.

When local regulations were eventually loosened allowing the consumption of some alcoholic beverages outdoors in controlled festival settings, one longtime businessman was overheard saying, "I can't believe that I'm standing here on the streets of Tifton drinking a beer."

There are legitimate reasons for Tifton's long issues with alcohol. It goes back to even before the city was incorporated. Tifton began as a rough and rowdy lumber mill community in the 1870s. Whiskey flowed freely, and inhabitants often got drunk and caused mayhem. Churches were routinely burned to the ground, until they began being built of brick rather than wood.

When the city was organized, City Council set an alcohol license fee of $10,000 – more than $300,000 in today's dollars – which halted all legitimate alcohol sales in Tifton and boarded up the saloons.

An article in The Tifton Gazette by Editor B.T. Allen in May 1891 recounted his conversation with a traveling businessman on a train who said he had been visiting Tifton since it was "an insignificant mill site on the Brunswick & Albany Railroad."

The businessman said that in the town's early days, "whiskey was sold, and Tifton had a very unsavory reputation – drunkenness, fightings, and murder were the rules. People were very shy about visiting the place, and when business called a man to go there, he invariably went on one train and left on the next and didn’t stay all night, if he could possibly avoid it."

He added that "With the exit of the grog shops, Tifton morals commenced to improve at once. ... The energy and thrift of her people – they are wide awake, quick of perception and willing to make use of every pointer which they can discover that will advance the city’s interest. They have pluck, and pluck will win success."

Times have changed immeasurably, Tifton's once "unsavory reputation" has long ago faded into the mists of history. Tifton is a progressive city where change comes following careful deliberation, preserving the city’s heritage while looking toward a brighter future.

Tiftonites still have pluck, and as that unknown businessman said 130 years ago, "pluck will win success."
Thomasville Pictures co-owners Ryan Donnell Smith, left, and Thomasville native Allen Cheney, at far right, with the director and stars of 'The Tiger Rising,' filmed partially in Tifton. The Thomasville producers are among those involved in the film 'Rust,' in which a cinematographer was killed by a live round in a prop gun fired by actor Alec Baldwin.
THOMASVILLE PICTURES AMONG 'RUST' PRODUCERS
COMPANY ALSO PRODUCED 'TIGER RISING,' 'BANDIT'
By FRANK SAYLES JR.
Tifton Grapevine
Thomasville Pictures, which helped produce the films “The Tiger Rising” and “Bandit” in Tifton and Thomasville, is one of the primary production companies involved in the film Rust," which shut down after a cinematographer was killed and the director injured by a gun discharged by actor Alec Baldwin.

Allen Cheney, a Thomasville native, co-owns Thomasville Pictures with Ryan Donnell Smith. Cheney is an executive producer of Rust," and Smith is a producer, according to IMDb, the Internet Movie Database.

Although Cheney is one of the film's five executive producers and Smith is one of six producers listed, the limited liability company created for the film lists its address as the same one listed in Georgia by Thomasville Pictures, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Producers of independent movies commonly create limited liability companies for business and legal reasons, the newspaper said.

In a statement to the LA Times, Thomasville's Cheney defended the producers of “Rust.” 

“The six credited producers on the independent film ‘Rust’ – Ryan Smith, Alec Baldwin, Nathan Klingher, Ryan Winterstern, Matt DelPiano and Anjul Nigam – collectively have more than 35 years’ experience producing small to mid-level film and television projects,” Cheney said.

“‘Rust’ is a union-certified production, in good standing with all of the major production unions and guilds, including IATSE, the Teamsters, SAG, and DGA. Consistent with financing partners across productions of all sizes, Streamline Global, Emily Salveson and I received executive producer credit on the film ‘Rust,’ having no involvement with the physical and day-to-day production.”

Thomasville Pictures also helped produce “Bandit,” which stars Josh Duhamel and Mel Gibson, and was filmed this past spring in Downtown Tifton and Thomasville. The company’s first project, "The Tiger Rising," starring Queen Latifah and Dennis Quaid, was filmed partly at Tifton's Town Terrace "Pink" Motel in 2019. No official release date has been issued, but the latest word is that the film is expected to come out in January.
TIFTON SETS ANNUAL VETERANS DAY TRIBUTE
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Tifton's annual Veterans Day Tribute will be at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 11, in Veterans Park downtown.

The ceremony is dedicated to those who serve and have served in the U.S. military.

This year's speaker will be Chaplain John Jacobs. The Tifton Fire Department will handle the presentation of colors, and local singer Brenda Saunders will once again sing the National Anthem.

As always, an empty chair will be placed on stage during the ceremony in honor of the late state Rep. Henry Bostick, who was a Tifton attorney, a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, a former VFW commander and a tireless supporter of military veterans.
TIFT SEES 11 CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES, 1 DEATH
IN PAST WEEK, DPH SAYS
By FRANK SAYLES JR.
Tifton Grapevine
Tift County reports 11 new confirmed COVID-19 cases and one related death during the past week, according to data Thursday from the Ga. Department of Public Health (DPH).

During the past two weeks, Tift County recorded 17 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 37 total cases when rapid Antigen positive cases are added, the DPH said.

Tift County’s confirmed cases in the past two weeks represent 42 cases per 100,000 population, and 91 cases with Antigen positives. Tift's testing positivity rate for the virus was 2% during the two-week period, the DPH reported.

There have been a total of 4,868 confirmed cases and 136 deaths in Tift since the pandemic began, according to DPH data.

On Thursday, the DPH reported 907 new confirmed cases within 24 hours in Georgia, along with 459 new Antigen cases, 68 additional related deaths, and 164 new hospitalizations. The state has recorded a total of 1,267,762 cases with 25,042 deaths, the DPH reported.

According to DPH data, as of Thursday afternoon, 40% of eligible Tift countians were fully vaccinated against the virus, while statewide the number was 50%.
TIFTAREA ACADEMY WINS REGION ONE-ACT PLAY COMPETITION
Tiftarea Academy's One-Act Play team won the GISA Region 3-AAA competition Thursday in Americus.

The team won with the play "And Scene! under the direction of Marlee Cox and Assistant Director Allison Carteru.

Outstanding Performer awards were presented to Tiftarea students Sarah Hutto and Reid Phillips, holding the awards in the above photo.
 
State competition will be on Thursday, Nov. 11, in Vidalia. 
TIFTON
2012 Pineview Ave., Tifton, Ga 31793
AZALEA WINDS CONCERT TO
HONOR PEARL HARBOR DAY
The Azalea Winds will provide a special tribute for the 80th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at a concert set for 7 p.m. Nov. 16 in ABAC's Howard Auditorium.

The performance is part of the annual fall band concert at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. The concert is free and open to the public.

ABAC Band Director Deborah Bradley said if weather permits, the ABAC Jazz Ensemble will open the evening with a few selections in the Howard Auditorium Rotunda at 6:30 p.m. The ABAC Concert Band will perform at 7 p.m. on stage in Howard. Several members of the ABAC group will also perform with the popular South Georgia Classic Community Band.

The Azalea Winds portion of the event is titled “Let’s Remember,” a nod to the 80th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. Christina Huss and Alan Carter from Valdosta have composed an original composition that reflects the scene and horror of the event.

Several Christmas pieces will also be featured in the concert. Area musicians from Tifton are among those performing.
'GLOW RUN' TO GLOW NOV. 19
The Tifton Junior Woman's Club's annual Glow Run, a 5K and one-mile fun run, begins at 6 p.m. Nov. 19 at Northside Baptist Church.

The night-time run is for the whole family, casual walkers, and avid runners. There will be music, black lights, glow-in-the-dark face painting, and more.

Proceeds benefit the club's scholarship fund and other community service projects.

To register, Click Here!
WALK THIS WAY FOR COOKIES...
Peace Lutheran Church in Tifton will have its annual Cookie Walk from 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, Nov. 20

The event features cookies for $2 per six-cookie pack, homemade cakes, breads, peanut brittle, candies, homemade German pastries, and many holiday baked treats. Among cookies to be found are the popular Cardamom Cuties, Cappuccino Royals, German Gems, Ginger Snaps, and Lemon Crackles.
           
Proceeds will be sent to the USO for Operation Phone Home for soldiers and for Peace Lutheran Church Mission. Additional funds will be provided by Thrivent Financial.

Peace Lutheran Church is located at 604 Tennessee Drive in Tifton.
SHORT & PAULK NAMES PRESIDENT
Short & Paulk Supply Co. has promoted Chris Graddy to company president. The announcement was made by company CEO J.P. “Jay" Short V.

Graddy joined the Short & Paulk team in 2005 at the Sylvester location. He worked his way up to his most recent position as chief operations officer, directing the company’s sales and operations. As COO, Graddy also played an instrumental role in building Short & Paulk’s current leadership team. 

Short & Paulk has experienced unparalleled growth over the past few years. We now operate six locations and ship materials in three states. Since starting with us in 2005, Chris has worked in every single phase of our business. He is dedicated, hardworking, and takes ownership of everything he touches. Chris has the experience and the drive to lead our team into the future.” said Jay Short.

Short & Paulk is family owned; CEO Short is a third-generation family member. The company was founded in 1941 by J.P. Short III and H.M. Paulk in an old warehouse along the railroad tracks on South Main Street in Tifton.

Short & Paulk always sold building materials, but in the early days was also heavily involved in the agricultural supply business, selling tractors, farm implements, feeds, seeds, and fertilizers. Short & Paulk currently operates six lumberyards-home centers in Tifton, Sylvester, Albany, Dawson, Cuthbert, Thomasville, and a door manufacturing plant in Tifton.

Employing more than 90 full- and part-time employees, Short & Paulk ships building products to job sites throughout South Georgia, North Florida, and Southeast Alabama. 
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YOUR GUIDE TO ACTIVITIES THIS WEEKEND IN THE TIFTAREA

Daylight Savings Time ends at 2 a.m. this Sunday, Nov. 7. Set your clocks back one hour, returning to standard time. This means that the sunrise will be earlier, and sunset will also come at an earlier time. Can winter be far behind?
FRIDAY, NOV. 5
  • First Friday, 5 p.m., Downtown Tifton
  • Tiftarea Academy Panthers football @ Valwood Valiants, 7:30 p.m., Valdosta

SATURDAY, NOV. 6
  • Wiregrass Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-Noon, Ga. Museum of Agriculture, Tifton
  • 11th Annual Run for Your Lungs, 9 a.m., Lake Blackshear Resort, Cordele
  • Fall Festival, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fulwood Park, Tifton
  • Irwinville Re-enactment Weekend, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Jefferson Davis Memorial Historic Site, Irwinville

SUNDAY, NOV. 7
  • Irwinville Re-enactment Weekend, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Jefferson Davis Memorial Historic Site, Irwinville
TIFTON GRAPEVINE'S DOG OF THE WEEK
“Betty," a female pooch, is available for adoption. If you're interested in adopting this happy dog and providing her a good home, visit the Tift County Animal Shelter on Highway 125 South between 1-6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. For more information, call 229-382-PETS (7387).
Pets of the Week are sponsored by:
Branch’s Veterinary Clinic
205 Belmont Ave., Tifton, 229-382-6055  
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OCTOBER 28
Memzie Holmes, 83, Ashburn
Donald Bennett, 64, Enigma
 
OCTOBER 29
Alexis Lynn Harper, 3, Nashville
Frances D. Smith, 86, 
Fitzgerald
Leonardo Coronel-Mejia, 39, Fitzgerald
 
OCTOBER 30
L. Edwin Massey, 90, Worth County
Judy Darlene Jackson Funderburk, 69, Tifton
Elizabeth "Libby" Jane Meeler, 69, Sparks
William C. “Bill” Sowell, 95, Fitzgerald
 
OCTOBER 31
Patricia “Lynn” Wood Herebia, 50, Tifton
 
NOVEMBER 1
Terrill “Terry” Randall Spivey, 53, Bartow, Fla.
 
NOVEMBER 2
Josephine Elizabeth Harris Barfield Wiggins, 93, Bainbridge
John David Nelson, 75, Ashburn
Kenneth "Kenny" Jackson Cowart, 63, Adel
NOVEMBER 3
Bobbie Hasty Summers, 94, 
Tift County
Doris Wilkerson Hardin, 89, Ashburn
Charles R. Thurmond, 78, Sylvester
Tifton Grapevine
e-published every Tuesday and Friday

Frank Sayles Jr.
Editor & Publisher
Bonnie Sayles
Managing Editor
A Service of Sayles Unlimited Marketing LLC, Tifton, Georgia