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JUNE 8, 2018
Tifton, Georgia

478-227-7126
2 TIFTON DISHES
AMONG GEORGIA'S '100 PLATES 
LOCALS LOVE'

Dishes at  two Tifton eateries have been selected as among  " 100 Plates Locals Love" in Georgia.


The Local's Duck Gumbo was also named one of the Top 10 locally sourced dishes in Georgia this  year by  Chef Holly Wulfing Chute, executive chef of Georgia Grown, an economic development program of the Georgia Department of Agriculture.

The "100 Plates" list begins with Chef Chute's Top 10 "of her must-try locally sourced dishes in Georgia." She writes of The Local's Duck Gumbo that "Chef David Scarbrough takes duck, which a lot of people are afraid to try, and makes it approachable yet very unique. This dish says ... more."

The remaining Top 10 dishes are at restaurants in  Atlanta, Alpharetta, Roswell, Rome, Blue Ridge, Brunswick and Savannah.
The Tourism Division also noted that " Shady Lane (Drive Inn) is a Tifton institution. The chili dogs are must haves."

The popular "100 Plates Locals Love" list is in the 2018 state culinary guide "Georgia Eats," published by the state economic development department's Tourism Division.

"There is no better way to immerse yourself in Georgia's history and culture than through our unique food and dining offerings," said Kevin Langston, deputy commissioner for tourism at the Ga. Department of Economic Development. "Whether you're looking for local favorites or finding the best food festival for a weekend away, 'Georgia Eats' is the perfect guide to delicious experiences you can't find anywhere else."

The "Georgia Eats" culinary guide is available at the state's 12 visitor information centers across the state and on the state's consumer tourism website  ExploreGeorgia.org


GA TAX COLLECTIONS
RISE DURING MAY

Georgia's net tax collections for May totaled almost $1.76 billion, an increase of $31.5 million, or 1.8 percent, compared to last year when net tax collections totaled nearly $1.73 billion, Gov. Nathan Deal said Wednesday.

Year-to-date, net tax collections total $20.73 billion, for an increase of $940.8 million, or 4.8 percent, compared to May 2017, when net tax revenues totaled roughly $19.79 billion.
DEAL


The changes within the following tax categories contributed to the overall net tax revenue increase:
  • Individual Income Tax: Collections increased by $12.4 million, or 1.4 percent, compared to last year.
  • Sales and Use Tax: Collections totaled almost $975.8 million, for an increase of $65.5 million, or 7.2 percent, over last year. Net sales and use tax increased by nearly $15.6 million, or 3.3 percent.
  • Corporate Income Tax: Collections for May increased by $5.3 million, or 15.8 percent.
  • Motor Fuel Taxes: Collections during the month totaled almost $151.7 million, for an increase of $4.9 million, or 3.3 percent, compared to May 2017.
  • Motor Vehicle Tag & Title Fees: For the month, totaled $32.1 million, for an increase of $2.4 million, or 8.2 percent, over last year.


WE HAVE MOVED!
JOIN US FOR OUR RIBBON CUTTING 
& DROP-IN OPEN HOUSE

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony ~ Friday, June 8 at 10 a.m.
Drop-In Open House until 2 p.m. 
911 Main Street South

Yoga Mat drawing when you sign up for a class or buy a punch card.
 Drawing at the Open House! 

We now offer Yoga classes.  Space is limited; get to class a few  minutes early!

Email yoga.wts@outlook.com to sign up.  We have yoga mats or bring your own! 

During June only: $12 drop-in per class. Packages available!

For more information, call (229) 560-1355


EX TCHS VALEDICTORIAN NAMED ABAC AMBASSADORS PRESIDENT

Kaycee Aultman has been selected as the 2018-19 president of the ABAC Ambassadors, one of the most prestigious student leadership organizations at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College.  

Aultman, daughter of Stacy and Jerri Kaye Aultman, is a junior writing and communication major
AULTMAN
from Tifton who always knew she wanted to attend ABAC. During her years in the Tift County School System, she had multiple opportunities to visit the campus. 

"ABAC is in my blood," Aultman said. "Both my parents are ABAC alumni, and my mom was an ambassador during her time at ABAC. Around the time I was born, my grandfather retired from ABAC as a maintenance supervisor. I have many reasons to love our green and gold."

Aultman learned of the ambassador program through her mother. She also had friends in the program who encouraged her to apply after she graduated from Tift County High School as the valedictorian of the Class of 2016. Aultman served as ambassadors secretary during her freshman year and vice president in her sophomore year. She received the Distinguished Ambassador Award this spring.

Aultman will travel to Cebu, Philippines, this summer for a week-long mission trip where she will work with Samaritan's Purse and distribute shoe boxes filled with gifts for children as a part of the Operation Christmas Child ministry.



SRTC STUDENTS GIVE TO RUTH'S COTTAGE

Ruth's Cottage emergency domestic violence shelter received a donation of paper supplies from Southern Regional Technical College (SRTC) students on Tuesday

Ruth's Cottage Director Nancy Bryan had recently talked to several classes at the school about Ruth's Cottage and the Patticake House. Students say they were inspired to give back.

Pictured from left are Bryan, Shelter Manager Holly Tyson and Carolyn West, SRTC transition program specialist.









RAINS CAN BRING MOSQUITOES

Recent storms are leaving behind more than downed limbs; the rains are also bringing mosquitoes.

Every possible container around our homes, yards and neighborhoods that hold water can be a mosquito breeding site.

Mosquitoes in their larval and pupal stages require standing water, and the most efficient, effective technique to reduce the adult mosquito population is to eliminate standing water. But this can be trickier than it appears.
  This year's mosquito season has had a relatively slow start . Despite a warm February , a cool March slowed development, and winter was dry across Middle and South Georgia , where many of Georgia's natural mosquito habitats occur. The recent rains have made the state relatively wet and left water standing in low-lying areas. 

These temporary habitats can be productive for mosquitoes.  All mosquitoes need moisture, either standing water or boggy soil, to develop from eggs to adults. Only adult mosquitoes bite

The most common larval habitats around homes and gardens are dishes and trays associated with potted plants. Other habitats include tarps, downspouts, underground drainage systems and boats. Anything that can hold water can become a breeding ground for mosquitoes. 

Used tires are a particularly problematic habitat for container-breeding mosquitoes.  In addition to containers, some low-lying areas will hold water, allowing flood-water species of mosquitoes to emerge.

While local transmission of the Zika virus was never observed in Georgia during a recent outbreak, the risk of being exposed to the West Nile virus continues to be a threat. Last year, the Ga. Department of Public Health recorded 64 human cases of the virus and seven deaths.


IT'S A REAL 'BEAUTY'

The Keep Tift Beautiful board congratulates the University of Georgia Tifton Campus as this month's Commercial Beauty Spot of the Month.

Pictured is Dr. Joe West, assistant dean of the campus, which recently added new signage, new landscaping and completed facility renovations.


FERTILIZER-HERBICIDE DISTRIBUTOR
PROMOTES TIFT COUNTY NATIVE 

Chula native  Kevin Branch has been appointed  horticulture sales director at e mployee-owned  Harrell's, one of the nation's largest distributors of branded fungicides, herbicides and insecticides, and producer of custom-blended fertilizer .

Branch has been with Harrell's for 16 years, initially as a territory manager of the Central Florida
BRANCH
region and for the past six years as a key account manager. He has more than 20 years in the industry, but his initial experience began in agriculture having been raised on his family's peanut, cotton and tobacco farm.

From there he earned his associates of science degree in forest technology from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College before attending the University of Georgia, earning his bachelor's degree in agriculture and his master's degree in plant protection and pest management. 

"Kevin has been integral in managing the needs of some of the largest nurseries in the country, most with multiple locations in geographic and agronomically distributed areas," says Rick Helpingstine, vice president of horticulture. "We are looking forward to his assistance in our Western region as we continue to expand west of the Rockies."


FAMILY PROMISE TO MEET MONDAY

Family Promise of Tift Area will have its regular monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June
11, at Dayspring Inspirational Church, 620 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Tifton.

Michael Norman, student services director for Tift County Schools, will share information and statistics on homelessness and unaccompanied youth in Tift County.

The meeting is open to all interested local residents .

Family Promise of the Tift Area is dedicated to helping local homeless families achieve  sustainable independence.


SENIOR DANCE SET JUNE 15

The local "SELF" organization -- "Seniors Enjoying Life Forever" -- will hold its monthly dance on Friday, June 15.

Doors open at 6 p.m. at Tifton's Leroy Rogers Senior Center on Second Street. All participants are asked to bring a dish of food to share.

For information, contact   dashers@windstream.net


GSP REPORTS 54 CRASHES, 3 FATALITIES IN MAY

The  Georgia State Patrol (GSP) issued 375 traffic citations and  investigated 54 traffic accidents in Tift County during May.

GSP Post 13 in Tifton reported that the traffic accidents involved 24 injuries and three fatalities.
 
The traffic citations include 10 arrests for driving under the influence, 189 citations for speeding, 38 seatbelt violations and six child-restraint violations. 

State troopers also issued 398 warnings in Tift County during the month.

Rotary President Shaundra Clark, from left, Downtown Development Director Lequrica Gaskins and City Councilman/Downtown Development Authority member Frank Sayles Jr..

TIFTON ROTARY HEARS ABOUT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT

From 2004 to 2016, more than $35 million has been invested in downtown Tifton, with 959 jobs created, Lequrica Gaskins, downtown development director for the City of Tifton, told the Tifton Rotary Club on Wednesday

"We are working to create a synergy and a sense of place," she said. 

More than 12,000 promotional events were held in 2017, including such large events as the Hometown Holiday Christmas Celebration and Rock the Block. She said 88,000 people attended events, and more than 1,000 people volunteered. 

Rotary member Wayne Jones applauded Gaskins' ability to write and obtain grants for economic development of the downtown area.

2 BRIDGES IN WORTH COUNTY TO BE REPLACED

Several bridges i n  Worth and Terrell counties are going to be replaced as part of the state's Low Impact Bridge Program.

The Georgia Department of Transportation recently awarded construction contracts totaling $2.7 million to replace three structurally deficient bridges on county roads.

Two Worth County bridges will be replaced: The Whiddon Mill Road bridge over Ty Ty Creek is about one mile northeast of Sumner and was built in 1965; and the County Road 318/old SR 50 bridge over Little Piney Woods Creek located four miles west of Sylvester. It was built in 1925

The construction contracts for the Worth County bridges were awarded to Underground Excavating Inc. of Patterson.

In Terrell County, the John Fox Road bridge over Walk-Ikey Creek will be replaced. It is about six miles southwest of Dawson and was built in 1955. The contract was awarded to Southern Concrete Construction Co. of Albany.


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YOUR WEEKEND 
         . ..at a Glance


SATURDAY, JUNE 9
  • "Taste of the Market," Wiregrass Farmers Market, 9 a.m,-Noon, Georgia Museum of Agriculture, Tifton
  • Potters on the Porch, 10 a.m., Plough Gallery, Tifton
  • Community Health & Wellness Expo and Fun Fair, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Beulah Hill Family Life Center, 321 Tifton Eldorado Road, Tifton

SUNDAY, JUNE 10
  • Motown Tribute Concertp.m., Tift Theatre for the Performing Arts, Tifton

In Memoriam
BowenDonaldson

MAY 31
Velva Faye Bledsoe, 97, Tifton
Ricky Noel Sanders, 63, Tifton
Linda Marie Owens, 61, Sparks
Kenneth Edward "Wisey" Wise, 75, Ocilla

JUNE 1
Peggy Ann Miller Tucker, 82, Tifton
Bobbie Luke McGrady, 74, Kenneth City, Fla.
Carol Cooley, 67, Ray City
Virgil Joseph Strange, 84, Atlantic Beach, Fla.

JUNE 2
Carolyn Robinette, 73, Nashville

JUNE 3
Cleon Clifford Tankersley, 90, Ocilla

JUNE 4
Carl Thomas "Tommy" Mullis, 81, Tifton
Barbara Ann Williams Franklin, 59, Ty Ty
Geneva Doris Tucker Collins, 91, Tifton
John Thomas Burns Jr., 90, McDonough

JUNE 5
Bobby Willis, 82, Sylvester
Dorothy "Dottie" Hester Duren, 83, Adel
Kenneth Gadjen, 63, Nashville

JUNE 6
Frankie Butler King, Sylvester

JUNE 7
Roger Stanford, 61, Fitzgerald
Cortez Brown Milam, 91, Sycamore



645 Whatley Drive, Ashburn
MLS#  128222

This 1,500-square-foot brick home has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, a paved drive, a shop and a fenced back yard.  


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FRANK SAYLES JR.
Editor & Publisher

iheardit@tiftongrapevine.com

A Service of Sayles Unlimited Marketing LLC

478-227-7126