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"Let Food Be Thy Medicine"
Hippocrates

October  2019

Jean Varney
Jeannie Varney
 Nutrition Consultant
 HC, AADP
703.505.0505

 

  
Welcome to the Eat Right Be Fit Live Well monthly link roundup.
 
Each week I read many interesting articles relating to nutrition, fitness and wellness. Here are some of my favorites from the past month. While every article may not be relevant to your personal circumstance, I hope at least one will spark your interest and provide you with a healthy tip you can incorporate into your daily routine.  
 

Best,
 
Jeannie




 

October
Does It Matter How Much Meat You Eat?   Before subscribing to the "bacon of the month" club or indulging in a steak, read this. The recent, sensational headlines suggesting consuming meat is fine, is misleading. Shocker! What we know based on massive amounts of research ... "a diet low in red and processed meat is associated with a 14 percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, an 11 percent lower risk of death from cancer, and a 24 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes." Fish, chicken, eggs or legumes anyone? (Consumer Reports)

Breakfast With a Dose of Roundup?  How much Roundup (toxic weed killer) are you consuming in your cereal, oatmeal, granola and snack bars? If you're not buying organic varieties, then you're ingesting far too much. 160pp is the limit. (Environmental Working Group)

Dirty Dozen™ EWG's 2019 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce™   Here is EWG's list of produce that contains the most pesticides. When consuming these fruits and veggies, buy organic varieties to avoid toxic chemicals. (Environmental Working Group)

A Review of Ketchup with a Blend of Veggies from Heinz:  A perfect example of how food manufacturers mislead us. You're not fooled, right? Enjoy whole carrots dipped in hummus and roasted butternut squash sprinkled with salt straight from the oven not from a processed condiment. (Fooducate)

Changing Your Diet Can Help Tamp Down Depression, Boost Mood:  Feeling gloomy too often? Consider changing your diet. Your mood, energy, heart, brain and waistline will benefit. (NPR.org)

Heart Disease may Accelerate Cognitive Decline:  As I've said before, what's good for the heart is good for the brain. The foods most damaging to these organs are saturated fat laden red meat, palm and coconut oils and full-fat dairy and refined carbohydrates (foods containing added sugar or foods made with refined grains such as white, wheat, rice or other refined flour.) (Harvard Health) 

Is Himalayan or Unrefined Salt a Good Source of Minerals?  Misleading marketing claims may have you spending more money on salt than you need to. I do enjoy Real Salt sparingly. Not because it contains more minerals but because, in my opinion, it has a stronger flavor which means I use less of it. For most of us, less salt is better. (Nutrition Action newsletter)

How to Boil the Perfect Egg:  Yes, steaming eggs seems to keep yolks moist, whites tender and peeling easy. (NY Times)

How Accurate are Calorie Counts From Gym Equipment?  Fitness trackers don't accurately estimate the number of calories you burn during exercise but you can still use them. (Nutrition Action) 


About Jean Varney 
 
Jean Varney is the founder and president of Eat Right, Be Fit, Live Well LLC, a health and nutrition consulting firm committed to empowering men and women to improve their health through sustainable changes to their diet and lifestyle.  Based in the Washington DC metropolitan area, Jean coaches clients nationwide by phone and in person.  She focuses on helping individuals make smart choices about the foods they eat in order to maintain high energy levels, avoid unwanted weight gain and decrease their risk of heart disease, cancer, type II diabetes and other chronic illnesses.  Jean received her training at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York City.  To learn more about her practice, please visit her website at: www.EatRightBeFitLiveWell.com.