VOLUME 11 | ISSUE 73
USTAR ANNOUNCES NEWEST TAP AWARDS
USTAR’s Governing Authority approved grant funding for 14 Utah companies through the Technology Acceleration Program (TAP). Companies represent Box Elder, Davis, Salt Lake, Utah, and Wasatch counties, and feature several industry sectors including Aerospace, Automation and Robotics, Big Data, Energy, and Life Science.

“We received many strong proposals and recognize the competitiveness of this funding,” said Ivy Estabrooke, Ph.D., executive director of USTAR. “This group represents the top projects in this round as evaluated by expert panels.”...

USTAR INNOVATION CENTER NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
The USTAR Innovation Center is accepting applications from entrepreneurs and startup companies interested in participating in the incubation program. The program provides office and co-working space, access to high-tech equipment, grant programs, mentors, and tailored services. Memberships are also available to companies needing access to specialized equipment and tools to assist in the design, build, and testing of prototype development. The space includes 21,000 square feet of office, co-working space, conference rooms and prototype lab with specialized equipment and tools including 3D printers, a laser cutter, OMAX Waterjet, CNC mill and CNC lathe. 

The USTAR Innovation Center is located in Clearfield, adjacent to Hill Air Force Base.  

For more information or to request a tour, visit ustarinnovationcenter.com or contact Wayne Bradshaw at waynebradshaw@utah.gov or phone 385.602.6385.  
USU PROFESSOR WORKS TO IMPROVE BATTERY EFFICIENCY FOR APPLICATIONS
Originally appeared in The Herald Journal

Tianbiao “Leo” Liu has been interested in battery chemistry for years.

“Battery chemistry is pretty practical — you find battery applications everywhere,” said Liu, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Utah State University. “I think we have become like a heart for society.”

With the idea that battery chemistry can be used to improve daily life, Liu and his colleagues set out to study neutral aqueous organic redox flow batteries, known as AORFBs, to see if they could make them more efficient.

The studies Liu headed up were made possible by a Utah Science Technology and Research grant. The findings were published into two journals, “Chem” and “Journals of Material Chemistry A.” ...

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