Top Legal Stories You Might Have Missed
In some recent articles, linked below for your ease of reference, we wrote about:

  • The three circumstances when you should use confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements;
  • Why joint venture partners are personally liable for claims against the joint venture;
  • What you need to know about upcoming CCPA data collection and use notices;
  • The importance of incorporating as a shield to potential liabilities; and
  • The use of no-shop provisions in M&A deals under California law.

Read all my articles at https://sdcorporatelaw.com/blog/

Please enjoy the articles below and feel free to contact me for a consultation when you require legal counsel.
Confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements are essential to any San Diego business. A confidentiality and nondisclosure agreement is an agreement that protects the confidentiality of your company’s data and trade secrets. These agreements are not just for inventors or for...

A recent case from the US District Court in San Francisco held that the partners of a joint venture agreement could be held liable for the debts and obligations of the joint venture and could be sued as part of the action against the joint venture. Under California law, joint ventures are treated the same legally speaking as general partnerships...

The California Consumer Protection Act (“CCPA”) is going into effect at the beginning of 2020. There are various statutes being proposed right now in the State Assembly intended to make the CCPA even more protective of consumers. It is...

One of the most important reasons for forming a corporation to run your business is obtaining a shield against potential personal liability. In general, once a corporation is formed, it becomes a separate legal entity. Thereafter, when the corporation signs a contract, then the corporation is a party to the contract and, with a few...

In a merger and/or acquisition agreement, often the parties agree to what is called a “no shop” clause. A typical “no shop” clause prohibits a seller from soliciting or considering new or alternative bids for the business for a set amount of time. A “no shop” clause can also be used in an asset sale/purchase where the seller agrees not...

(p) 858.483.9200 | (f) 858.605.6766 | leonard@sdcorporatelaw.com | www.sdcorporatelaw.com
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