Hello

Over the years, I have had the good fortune to learn from some of Cleveland's best chefs. One Chef in particular, Chef Parker Bosley, has become a good friend and long time mentor. His cooking is legendary, and it's based on a few simple principles - quality ingredients, patience, and rich stock.

Each year for Christmas, Parker regularly gifts me some of his finest "vintages" from the year - rich stocks made from everything from pheasant to pork bones. These bone stocks are the foundation of good flavor and nutrition.

Making stock - or as some call bone broth - is really quite easy. Read below for more instruction.

For me, stock is as essential in my refrigerator as milk and eggs. It is the base for soup, a delicious sauce, a rich braised meat dish, and so much more. It's the finishing touch that you get in a restaurant.

Just last night I opened the refrigerator and scratched my head. It was a mess and I started to go crazy pulling out random this and that. I quickly settled on the chicken drumsticks brining in the back corner. I pulled them out knowing we needed to eat them tonight.

I drained them, patted them dry, and tossed them with a little flour, salt, and pepper. I rendered off some bacon in a pan, removed the bacon and browned the chicken. I then removed that, sauted some onion in the remaining grease and deglazed it with red wine. I added back the chicken, a couple links of Italian sausage, the onion, some garlic, and rough chopped tomatoes. I added about a quarter bottle red wine and a pint of chicken stock. The chicken was almost covered. I placed it in the oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

I removed the chicken and sausage and placed on a platter. I ran the vegetables through a food mill to separate the solids (onion and tomato chunks) from the liquid. I quickly made a roux of butter and flour, added the cooking liquid, and brought up to a boil. With the broth having more body now, I arranged the chicken and sausage on a platter, topped it with the vegetable solids, and poured the pan sauce over top.

It was delicious and simple. We ate too much too quickly and that stack of bills to pay after dinner quickly got pushed to another day!

Enjoy
Trevor

Apple Pie Season
Every food has it's season in my mind. BLT season is August when fresh tomatoes are available. There is no reason at all to eat this combination in the winter. I eagerly wait each year for the big heirlooms then whip up a batch of thick, homemade mayo. I just keep the Vitamix container in the fridge for the week, scooping out mayo to slather on bread between pieces of juicy tomato, crisp bacon, and lettuce.

But that season is quickly passing and now apples are abundant.

It is, therefore, apple pie season.

This week Ashley is whipping of the first apple pies of the season. The staff starts with crisp fall apples and tosses them with fall spices and organic sugar. The apples are baked until tender under a crunchy oat crumb topping of all the best things - brown sugar, cinnamon, oats, whole wheat flour, and butter.

Enjoy it cold or place in the oven to warm up this taste of fall!
Making Chicken Stock
In years past, we hosted a lot of cooking classes. Anyone who has attended has heard Parker (left) profess the benefits of making stock. Below are his instructions.

If you wish to see Parker or talk more with him, he "holds court" Sundays and Mondays (10 AM to 7 PM) and Thursday (3 to 7) at Ohio City Provisions behind the deli counter. He'd love to help answer any of your cooking questions.

Why Chicken Backs? This year we listened to your feedback and offered cutup chickens in the CSA share. You've probably noticed the boneless breast, thighs, drums, etc. We've had a lot of chicken cutup and we cannot fathom throwing the bones away.

To a chef, the bones are as valuable as the breast. As a CSA member, it is further important that we not waste this component otherwise we'd never be able to afford to put breast or thighs in the CSA share.

Step 1: Don't even put your chicken backs in the freezer. Put them in a stockpot right away. If you aren't going to make stock tonight, put them in the stockpot in the fridge to thaw so you don't forget about them.

Repeat. The freezer is where food goes to die slowly. Just start cooking it now.

Another Note: There is no way to vacuum seal sharp bones. They will be loose packed and the bag is guaranteed to leak in your fridge. DO NOT THAW WITHOUT A BOWL OR POT UNDERNEATH THE BONES.

Step 2: Add to the stockpot (optional) a few branches of celery (or frozen celery leaves from the summer), a few peeled carrots, an onion, a few cloves of garlic, and (if you have it) a few sprigs of fresh thyme or about a teaspoon of dried thyme.

Step 3: Fill the stockpot with cold water until the bones are submerged by about an inch or more.

Step 4: Bring the water to a simmer - just barely a boil - and let it simmer for at least 4 hours. I often find the perfect setting and let it roll overnight (be careful not to evaporate the water and scorch your pan).

Step 5: Strain out the bones and solids while the stock is hot. Pass it first through a colander to remove the large pieces, then a second time through a fine sieve (like a chinois) or a damp kitchen towel. Refrigerate overnight.

Step 6: The fat will solidify on the top after it is cold. Remove the fat. If the stock is not "rich" enough for you, simply reduce it down at a boil. Some like lighter stock that is more of a broth, while other applications call for a rich stock that is thick in gelatin.

That's all there is to it. If you don't want to do it on the stovetop, you can also do the same thing in a crock pot. The fastest way to make stock is with a pressure cooker or Instapot - same process, just less time.

I made the stock, now what do I do with it?
You've probably heard all the buzz around bone broth, right? Same thing. Drink it for it's health benefits. If you do drink it, don't forget to season it some with salt and pepper.

Stock is also an important component of cooking. Use it to braise a pork roast or as the base for a soup. It also can be used to make gravy or to add flavor to a ragout of kohlrabi (or insert whatever root veg) or even a risotto. The applications of stock are endless. It has become one of the "staples" in my refrigerator that is in my toolbox for any meal that might arise.
Thanksgiving Packages
We have had a lot of emails and phone calls lately about Thanksgiving. This fall has been flying by and we are a bit behind on releasing the materials.

Expect a separate email from us later this week with details about our Thanksgiving offerings and an order form.

Sorry for the delay on this but we want to make sure everything is right for Thanksgiving.
Bag Contents
Cantaloupe: this is very late in the season for cantaloupe but I was in a field in Homerville last week and saw some very nice ones that just needed some time to ripen. With the warm weekend the goal is they ripened. The grower has no phone and we'll find out when we pick them up fresh this afternoon and again Thursday and Friday if we get enough. There is no way to tell until they are picked.
Small Omnivore
Chicken Backs/Bones
Carrots
Apples
Kale
Cabbage
Sweet Bell Peppers
Beets
Butternut Squash

Small Vegetarian
Carrots
Apples
Kale
Cabbage
Sweet Bell Peppers
Beets
Butternut Squash
Kohlrabi
Brussel Sprouts

Mini
Carrots
Apples
Kale
Butternut
Sweet Bell Peppers





Large Omnivore
Chicken Backs/Bones
Carrots
Apples
Kale
Cabbage
Sweet Bell Peppers
Beets
Butternut Squash
Chicken Thighs
Brussel Sprouts
Celery
Parsley
Cantaloupe (?)
Large Vegetarian
Carrots
Apples
Kale
Cabbage
Sweet Bell Peppers
Beets
Butternut Squash
Brussel Sprouts
Celery
Parsley
Cantaloupe (?)
Kohlrabi
Cauliflower








Small Vegan
Carrots
Apples
Kale
Cabbage
Sweet Bell Peppers
Beets
Butternut Squash
Kohlrabi
Brussel Sprouts









Reminder: Carnivore Share bags are every-other-week based on pick-up location. You will be randomly assigned to a group (A, B, C). Check for the assignment in your last name. By the end of the season, all groups will have received the same amount of all products.

Week 18 Carnivore Schedule
Avon, Brecksville, Lakewood, Middleburg Heights, North Olmsted, Ohio City Provisions, Strongsville, Tremont, Westlake



**Carnivore share bags are only available at the first "dropoff location" listed on the location tab of your account as of 6/1. Carnivore shares cannot be transferred. We pack for the exact number based on location.**
RECIPES
For more recipes, visit our archive at https://freshforkmarket.com/recipes/
SPECIAL ORDER
Location Details
Your special order will only be delivered only to your primary location as selected in your profile (see below). Please review this BEFORE placing your order (adjust + save as needed). Please do not email or call to change the location of your special order. It sounds easier said than done. Our software prints a pick list per location for what products we must take along. If we attempt to move it manually there is a high probability that we'll mess it up and no one will be happy.


Please leave the "new" location set in your profile until after you pick up your special order. You will have to log back into your account to change it back to your usual stop BEFORE you place your next order the following week.

When you get to your check-in, please let the greeter know you also have a special order to pick-up. The order is packed separate from the regular share.
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