Thursday, April 2, 2020

 

 
Palm Sunday, 2020

On Palm Sunday, at 9:00 AM you can "join in" on Facebook live for the Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday worship service, which will include the Liturgy of the Palms and Liturgy of the Word with the reading of The Passion according to Matthew.  

Palms were sent through the mail to our regular parishioners.  If you did not receive a palm, or would like to have another, you are invited to cut your own palm frond or living branch from a tree/bush in your yard.

Attached is the worship booklet so that you can follow along on Palm Sunday:


In preparation for our service, I invite you to pray this hymn text aloud or sing along with the recording noted below
Ride on, ride on in majesty!
Hark! all the tribes hosanna cry;
O Savior meek, pursue your road
with palms and scattered garments strowed.
 
Ride on, ride on in majesty!
In lowly pomp ride on to die:
O Christ, your triumphs now begin
o'er captive death and conquered sin.
 
Ride on, ride on in majesty!
The winged squadrons of the sky
look down with sad and wond'ring eyes
to see th'approaching sacrifice.
 
Ride on, ride on in majesty!
Your last and fiercest strife is nigh;
the Father on his sapphire throne
expects his own anointed Son.
 
Ride on, ride on in majesty!
In lowly pomp ride on to die;
bow your meek head to mortal pain,
then take, O God, your pow'r and reign.
 
The Choir of King's College Cambridge sings the hymn here:

Ride On ! Ride On In Majesty - King's College, Cambridge.
Ride On ! Ride On In Majesty - King's College, Cambridge.


Holy Week and Easter
The Heart of the Christian Year

Holy Week begins on the Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday, as Jesus enters Jerusalem and is welcomed as king. The week progresses to the Last Supper when Jesus washes the feet of his disciples and his betrayal and arrest on Thursday evening; his trial and crucifixion on Friday; and his conquering death and resurrection on Holy Saturday/Easter Sunday. These services provide a liturgical experience of the last days of Jesus' earthly life.

Holy Week culminates with the Paschal Triduum (sacred three days): starting the evening of  Maundy Thursday, through the evenings of Good Friday and Holy Saturday (with the Great Vigil of Easter,)  and ending the evening of Easter; all celebrating the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. The Paschal Triduum is experienced as one liturgy: having remembered the institution of the Holy Eucharist at the Last Supper, we wait and pray (vigil) at the altar of repose on Maundy Thursday; then we continue with the reading of the Passion along with the veneration and prayer (vigil) at the cross of Christ on Good Friday; leading us to the Easter Vigil where we gather and pray (vigil) around the new fire to hear the stories of salvation after which we celebrate the resurrection of Christ in the Holy Eucharist; a celebration that continues into Easter day.  "Stay with me, keep watch with me.  Watch and pray."

Sunday of the Passion - Palm Sunday:  April 5 th
9:00AM   (Facebook Live or recorded version on our website)
Liturgy of the Palms and Liturgy of the Word with a reading of The Passion According to Matthew

Maundy Thursday:  April 9 th
7:00PM   (Facebook Live or recorded version on our website)
Liturgy of the Word with commemoration of Foot Washing and service to our neighbors in need, prayers and blessing of bread and wine at the family dining table and then silent Stripping of the Altar (dining table).  The worship of this day has no dismissal.

Good Friday:  April 10th 
12:00pm   (Facebook Live or recorded version on our website)
Noon day prayer with the Stations of the Cross

7:00PM   (Facebook Live or recorded version on our website)
Liturgy of the Word including hearing the Passion of Christ, solemn prayers and the veneration of the cross with time for individual prayer at the cross of Christ

Holy Saturday - The Great Vigil of Easter:  April 11th 
(postponed at St. John's; you may join the 2019 recorded celebration from St. Paul's Cathedral with a current sermon from the Dean at: https://www.stpaulcathedral.org/connect/videos1/ )
We gather (vigil) in prayer as we light the new fire and Paschal Candle and we hear again the stories of salvation; renew our faith with the reaffirmation of our Baptismal vows, followed by the Celebration of Holy Eucharist and the receiving of Easter Communion.

Sunday of the Resurrection - Easter Day:  April 12 th
10:30AM   (Website and/or internet link will be communicated)
Please join the diocesan-wide festive celebration of Easter scripture and hymns represented by many parishes of the diocese including St. John's.


We are not alone -
Reflection for Palm Sunday
 
 
The Antonine Plague of 165, the Plague of Justinian in 541, and the Bubonic Plague of 1348 found priests and deacons ministering among the sick and dying - and then contracting the disease and dying. Rather than gather in community centers and, later, in parish churches or cathedrals, the Christian people worshiped in their homes. Some believed, sadly, that God sent disease as punishment for human immorality. We have heard this line of thought voiced in the past weeks by a number of prominent evangelical preachers in the U.S. In this view, Christ appears as the judge who separates sheep ("good Christians") from goats ("immoral people").  Others, however, viewed the plague as the opportunity to act with charity toward those who suffer. For them, the image of the suffering Christ and the image of Mary holding her dead son in loving embrace were prominent. 
We are a church, a people that holds to the second view. For us, discovering the origin and appropriate treatment of disease is the province of medical professionals, not preachers. We hold that God does not "punish" G
od's creatures with sickness but rather loves them and desires that they flourish. Medicine can thus be an agent of grace. Christian faith in Jesus and his healing work, his self-giving in life and in death, invite us into an ethic of care for anyone who suffers in this world. Leave judgment to cranky old preachers: it is its own reward.
It was the English mystic, Julian of Norwich, alive during the P lague of 1348, who called Christ our " Mother" - the mother who feeds her children with life, not death. Jean Janzen's paraphrase of Julian's writing offers this image as we keep Palm Sunday and the proclamation of Matthew's Passion: "Mothering Christ, you took my form, offering me your food of light, grain of new life and grape of love, your very body for my peace." We are keeping a fast from communion and yet we know as a sacramental people that the Holy Three are with us in this time of trial, offering us the gift of light, life, love, and peace. Let us hold to these gifts in the days ahead.  

(Rev. Samuel Torvend, Christ Episcopal Church, Tacoma)



Stewardship
 
As we continue in this time of separation, please know that the operations of the parish continue with our staff working from home and in the office.  Even though we can't gather in person on Sundays, it is important - as you are able - to remain faithful stewards of our time, talent and treasure.  In a time when people are losing their jobs and income, I can imagine the difficulty of trying to make ends meet.  The church is no different - as we have financial obligations that the parish must continue to meet. 

As you are able, I offer 4 ways to continue giving your pledge: 
1)  US mail

2)  the secured lock box next to the parish office door on Wednesdays and Thursdays between 9:00am and 3:00pm

3)  Sally can add an automatic credit or debit payment by providing to her in writing the necessary information (bank name, account number, expiration date and amount to be withdrawn, 

4)  you can go to your bank (physically or on line) to set up an automatic payment to St. John's by bank check once a month.


 

If you need help with any of these options, please contact Sally via email ( sally@saint-johns.org) or phone call to the office on Thursdays for assistance.

I hope that you will be able to join us in worship either live on Facebook or "on demand" with the recorded worship service posted on our website.  We all look forward to the day when we will once again gather in person as a family of faith to worship our God. Blessings and Peace

Staying Connected in Isolation

Parishioners at St. John's have been divided into nine groups of 12-14 families/individuals each.  If you haven't been sent a list of the members of your group, you will soon.  One member of each group will have sent the list to the others, but there is no leader. All group members are asked to contact all the others on the list, perhaps in a two-week period. This means that ideally each of us will make one call per day. Those with ecard subscriptions are encouraged to send cards as well.

Let us all encourage one another until the day that we can meet in our beautiful sanctuary, hug and shake hands, and thank our God.
 
Scripture Readings For This Sunday

Readings for Sunday, April 5, 2020

Matthew 21:1-11
Isaiah 50:4-9a
Psalm 31:9-16
Philippians 2:5-11
Matthew 26:14-27:66

Lent 2020

We are completing our Lenten journey
with the Way of the Cross


The Way of the Cross - prayer and reflections for the 14 Stations of the Cross
As we make our way through Lent, the weekly newsletter will include two or three Stations with questions of reflection for you to use in your prayer and meditation.  By the end of Lent, you will have "walked" all 14 Stations. This week we continue with the final two stations:

Lent:  Week 6

Thirteenth Station
 
The body of Jesus is placed in the arms of his mother
 














We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you:
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.
 
All you who pass by, behold and see if there is any sorrow like my sorrow.
My eyes are spent with weeping; my soul is in tumult;
my heart is poured out in grief because of the downfall of my people.
"Do not call me Naomi (which means Pleasant), call me Mara (which means Bitter);
for the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me."
 
V.             Her tears run down her cheeks:
R.             And she has none to comfort her.
 
Let us pray. (Silence)
 
Lord Jesus Christ, by your death you took away the sting of death:
Grant to us your servants so to follow in faith where you have led the way,  that we may at length fall asleep peacefully in you and wake up in your likeness;  for your tender mercies' sake.   Amen.
 
Holy God,
Holy and Mighty,
Holy Immortal One,
Have mercy upon us.
 
Reflection:
Can you place yourself in Mary's position?
How have you grieved the loss of a love one?

 
Fourteenth Station
 
Jesus is laid in the tomb















We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you:
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.
 
When it was evening, there came a rich man from Arimathea, named Joseph,
who also was a disciple of Jesus.
He went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus.
Then Pilate ordered it to be given to him.
And Joseph took the body, and wrapped it in a clean linen shroud,
and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock;
and he rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb.
 
V. You will not abandon me to the grave:
R. Nor let your holy One see corruption.
 
Let us pray. (Silence)
 
O God, your blessed Son was laid in a tomb in a garden, and
rested on the Sabbath day: Grant that we who have been buried
with him in the waters of baptism may find our perfect rest in
his eternal and glorious kingdom; where he lives and reigns
for ever and ever.   Amen.
 
Holy God,
Holy and Mighty,
Holy Immortal One,
Have mercy upon us.
 
Reflection:
Is death the end of everything?
Is it the end of all you hope for as well?
Or is it true what Christians believe, that God raised Jesus from the dead and that he is still with us?
Because if that is true, then all the suffering and all the world's pain finds its answer in the power of God's love.
Is it true?

Concluding Prayers
 
Savior of the world, by your cross and precious blood you have redeemed us:
Save us, and help us, we humbly beseech you, O Lord.
 
Let us pray. (Silence)
 
We thank you, heavenly Father,
that you have delivered us from the dominion of sin and death
and brought us into the kingdom of your Son;
and we pray that, as by his death he has recalled us to life,
so by his love he may raise us to eternal joys;
who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.   Amen.
 
To Christ our Lord who loves us, and washed us in his own blood,
and made us a kingdom of priests to serve his God and Father,
to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever.   Amen.


Artwork by students from St. John's Episcopal School

For the complete Way of the Cross, please click here.


Year of Discipleship

The Episcopal Diocese of San Diego invites you to  Turn  as part of
The Year of Discipleship 2020  in this holy season of Lent.

The season of Lent is the perfect opportunity to turn and reorient yourself toward Jesus.

On the Way of Love, we don't only practice turning away from destructive things, but also turning ourselves toward God - like a flower setting its face toward the sun. In our daily lives, we are called to reorient ourselves to Jesus and his loving, liberating, life-giving Way.

Find a video message from Bishop Susan here and other resources for the Turn area of The Way of Love, as well as rules of life in this season of Lent here.




Current office hours are 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, Wednesday and Thursday.
If you need assistance, please email Maria Love: 


Prayers

We Are Available in Your Time of Need

If you have a pastoral emergency when the parish offices are closed, 
please call 619-301-0724 or email  revroger@saint-johns.org

Prayer List
 
Today and every day include some time for prayer, for yourself,
for your church family, and for those in need.  

For our Military
 
Matt, Drew, Cody,  Cameron,  Chariti, 
Mark,  Sean, Jonathan,  TK,   Christopher, 
Timothy,  Jeremy,  David,  Jonathan,  Nick, 
Jamal,  Matt, Daniel,  Jocelyn, Devon, 
Taylor, Jorge, Katherine, Sebastian and Richie.

  For Strength in Time of Need

Scott, Betty, Rob, Bill, Brian, Marcia,  Ed, Bernie, 
Donna,  Mary Ann,  Liz, Dean, Caroline, 
and for all doctors, nurses, medical support personnel, 
police officers, and first responders.

For Churches in Transition in our Diocese

Christ Church, Coronado
St. Paul, Palm Springs
St. Margaret's, Palm Desert
All Saints', Vista


From the Prayer Journal of Fr. Jack Tolley

This beautiful prayer was written by  Fr. Hendrick, OFM.
I thought you would enjoy it.
Blessings and love,  Jack.

Yes there is fear. 
Yes there is isolation. 
Yes there is panic buying.
Yes there is sickness.
Yes there is even death.
But,
They say that in Wuhan after so many years of noise
You can hear the birds again.
They say that after just a few weeks of quiet
The sky is no longer thick with fumes
But blue and grey and clear.
They say that in the streets of Assisi
People are singing to each other
across the empty squares,
keeping their windows open
so that those who are alone
may hear the sounds of family around them.
They say that a hotel in the West of Ireland
Is offering free meals and delivery to the housebound.
Today a young woman I know
is busy spreading fliers with her number
through the neighborhood
So that the elders may have someone to call on.
Today Churches, Synagogues, Mosques and Temples
are preparing to welcome
and shelter the homeless, the sick, the weary
All over the world people are slowing down and reflecting
All over the world people are looking at their neighbors in a new way
All over the world people are waking up to a new reality
To how big we really are.
To how little control we really have.
To what really matters.
To Love.
So we pray and we remember that
Yes there is fear.
But there does not have to be hate.
Yes there is isolation.
But there does not have to be loneliness.
Yes there is panic buying.
But there does not have to be meanness.
Yes there is sickness.
But there does not have to be disease of the soul
Yes there is even death.
But there can always be a rebirth of love.
Wake to the choices you make as to how to live now.
Today, breathe.
Listen, behind the factory noises of your panic
The birds are singing again
The sky is clearing,
Spring is coming,
And we are always encompassed by Love.
Open the windows of your soul
And though you may not be able
to touch across the empty square,
Sing.

Fr. Richard Hendrick, OFM
March 13th 2020

 
Opportunities For Service

Pill Bottle Ministry

Did you know that in developing countries, the pill bottle and cap is often more expensive than the medication inside. You can donate your empty prescription bottles! Just drop off your empty prescription bottles in our collection bucket located in the foyer- no need to peel the information off.  Our volunteers will take care of that for you! We will wash them and ship them to Matthew 25: Ministries.  Matthew 25: Ministries accepts donations of empty plastic pill bottles for inclusion in shipments of medical supplies and for shredding and recycling. Our pill bottle program fulfills the dual needs of improving medical care in developing countries and caring for our environment.

Please note that we can currently only collect the clear orange prescription bottles.  We have found that the others do not benefit the program.
Thank you for your support!
Emergency Food Pantry:

Jesus said, "Feed my sheep." John 21:17
The South Bay Community Services "Emergency Food Pantry" needs donations every month. It's easy to donate! We will focus on a different food category each month. Pick up a flyer from the narthex, carry in your car until your next trip to the market, purchase the food, and place it on the table in Nale Hall before the end of the month.  During the month of April, our featured items will be cereals, powdered and canned milk.  Thank you for your support!
  
The Vestry

David Dennehy,  Senior Warden
619-840-9994 
masterfrog@att.net
Mark Higginbotham,  Junior Warden
619-861-5510
Terry Farrelly,  Treasurer
Pamela Brittain
Ray Contreras
Diane Gustafson 
Mark Higginbotham
Muriel Kulikowski
Jim McDevitt
Judy McKay
Lynn Young

Approved Minutes for the January 22nd Vestry meeting can be found here:

Approved Minutes for the February 19th Vestry Meeting can be found here:

Rev. Roger's Office Hours
 
Rev. Roger will be available in the office Monday and Tuesday depending on his school schedule and all day Wednesday and Thursday.  He will be available by appointment.  Please call the office (619-422-4141) to schedule an appointment.

In case of a pastoral emergency, Rev. Roger may be reached on his cell phone at 619-301-0724.


To our Saint John's Family:
Here is your weekly newsletter highlighting important events at St. John's Episcopal Church.  You can also find news about St. John's at  www.saint-johns.org.

We welcome your feedback, photos, and news items. Contact Maria Love at 619-422-4141 or  maria@saint-johns.org .

Please submit your announcements by Tuesday of each week for inclusion in the Enews and Sunday bulletin.

Emergency Contact Information

If you had a medical emergency at church on Sunday morning, would the Wardens or church  staff know who to contact? If you would like to add someone to St. John's emergency contact  list in case of such an emergency, please contact Maria, our parish secretary (619-422-4141 or
maria@saint-johns.org). A sign-up sheet will also be available in the church lobby to collect this information. Please provide your name, the name of your emergency contact, their relationship to you, their phone number and/or their email address. This is one more way we can show how we love one another.
 
Reporting Misconduct
 
As part of our ongoing commitment to creating a safe haven for everyone, our diocese trains people in the prevention of misconduct and encourages all to report misconduct. All reported incidences are taken seriously and investigated thoroughly and confidentially. If you believe you have experienced misconduct of any kind, please contact Mr. John Seitman, (jseitman@pacbell.net), 858-793-4555 or Ms. Equilla Luke, (aequilla@icloud.com), 760-583-0485.

Safeguarding God's People
 
May the Lord bless you and keep you.
May God's face shine upon you and be gracious unto you.
May God give you the grace never to sell yourself short;
Grace to risk something big for something good;
Grace to remember that the world is too dangerous for anything but truth 
And too small for anything but love.
So, may God take your minds and think through them;
May God take your lips and speak through them;
May God take your hearts and set them on fire.
-William Sloane Coffin

In this issue
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phone: 619/422-4141
pastoral care: 619/301-0724
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