e-NEWS MAY 2021
IN THIS ISSUE...
  • A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
  • NCEES ANNOUNCES NEW RECORDS OPTION FOR MILITARY FAMILIES SEEKING COMITY LICENSURE
  • CLSA LOSES FRIEND, PATRICK MCNALLY, PLS 6969
  • EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE -- SUMMER SURVEYING COURSES
  • CEAC SURVEYORS POLICY COMMITTEE MEETING 
  • GEOSPATIAL SYMPOSIUM
  • BPELSG AGENDA
The CLSA Board of Directors had a great meeting on April 24 featuring lively discussions and reports and action items showing measurable progress towards our organization's Goals and Objectives. Your Directors will have all the details, but a couple of noteworthy items follow:

  • Establishment of a Liaison position to the League of California Surveying Organizations (LCSO). Kevin Hills was appointed as Liaison, and approved by the CLSA Board of Directors.

  • Establishment of a Committee to organize the California Young Surveyors Network (YSN). Sarah Walker was appointed as Chair. NCEES POLC Liaison Paul Goebel had offered reallocation of a portion of his budget to provide initial funding for the committee, which along with Sarah Walker’s appointment was approved by the CLSA Board of Directors.

Many of you have likely heard of the trouble on the international border between Belgium and France. According to the BBC, a Belgian farmer moved one of the stone border monuments because it was “in his tractor’s path.” The BBC article mentioned the boundary was “established under the Treaty of Kortrijk, signed in 1820 after Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo” and the stone monument “dates back to 1819, when the border was first marked.”

While this is a great example of the importance of having (and holding) undisturbed original monuments, I was disappointed to read that David Lavaux, mayor of the Belgian village of Erquelinnes, told French TV channel TF1 "He (the Belgian farmer) made Belgium bigger and France smaller, it's not a good idea." Although he didn’t grasp that the actual location of the border and size of the cities and nations did not change by moving the original monument, at least he recognized that moving monuments can “cause a headache between private landowners, let alone neighbouring states.” 

The BBC went on to identify the proposed resolution saying “Local Belgian authorities plan to contact the farmer to ask him to return the stone to its original location.” I certainly hope the professional surveying associations of Belgium and France step in to ensure the stone is restored to their best estimation of the original position. READ MORE.

Moving to the opposite side of the globe, a New Zealand man has been sued by his developer neighbor for NZ$315,000 because the house that his Contractor was nearly done building was ON the boundary line, rather than the 1 meter setback required. Apparently, the home design firm designed it that way, it was permitted, and surveyed to the permitted design.  Thankfully in this story, the Contractor’s Project Manager was quoted as saying "The first person I called was the surveyor. But he had actually marked the house in the right place according to the building consent." Think about how you/your practice/your staff would have handled this situation. If the NZ Surveyor KNEW or even suspected that the neighborhood required a 1m setback, the whole situation could have been resolved before the first stake was set. Sure – it may have caused a delay due to redesign or pursuing a variance for the setback incursion, but that would have been on the Design firm. This is a great opportunity to highlight how we as land surveyors can help our clients avoid these problems. READ MORE.

Another example of the importance of “where” popped up on the internet at Tampa’s Fox 13 News. Sadly, a young woman failed to consult a professional land surveyor or even a geography textbook prior to getting the latitude and longitude of Sedona, AZ tattooed on her left shoulder. The finished tattoo read 34° 52' 12" S, 111° 45' 36" W. Her comment was “I was so close!” No Miss, I’m afraid you were not close at all… Using the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) online INVERS3D tool, the output yielded is an ellipsoidal distance of 7,720,341.5631 meters, or nearly 4,800 miles. Yeah – “so close.” READ MORE.
Speaking of things geodetic, CLSA member John Tosto has completed preparing and submitting California’s final design parameters to NGS for the low distortion projections (LDPs) for Southern California (SCAL) and coastal Northern California (NCAL) for the State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPCS2022). This took a lot of effort, expertise, input and guidance from many CLSA and California Spatial Reference Center (CSRC) members, and of course our allies at the NGS): Pacific Southwest Regional Advisor Dana Caccamise and SPCS2022 Project Manager Michael Dennis. The LDPs will supplement the traditional six State Plane Coordinate System Lambert Conic Conformal Projection zones, with which we are all familiar, as well as a single statewide Oblique Mercator Projection zone. And remember, with the adoption of SPCS2022, we will be working in the international foot, or of course meters.

The SPCS2022 “SCAL” Zone (Oblique Mercator Projection) includes at least portions of six counties (Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Riverside Orange and San Bernardino) with a population over 19 million people. This SCAL Zone accommodates an estimated 90% of the population at or less than 20 ppm distortion. This regional LDP zone was unanimously supported by the County Surveyors of Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties.
The SPCS2022 “NCAL” Zone (Oblique Mercator Projection) started out as a LDP for a 36 square mile county but grew to cover 350 miles of the California Coast. The SPCS2022 “NCAL” Zone encompasses 13 counties (San Francisco, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano, Sonoma, Napa, Marin, Monterey, San Luis Obispo and San Benito) and over 8.5 million Californians. And once again, the NCAL LDP accommodates an estimated 90% of the population and all of the population centers with a projection with distortion less than 20ppm.

Thanks to all involved with the process that started for CLSA several years ago. As we move forward in implementing the SPCS2022, we licensed professionals will likely need to either learn new skills or refine what we already have, to truly master the use of the new reference frames and the geopotential datum. This means the educational and outreach opportunities that CLSA provides the entire geospatial community will increase in importance in the years ahead. Our partnerships and professional interactions with other organizations will be key to our shared success.

Lastly, I am asking each CLSA member to reach out to others who are not CLSA members and invite them to join or re-join us. I challenge every member to bring in at least one new member. Let’s achieve a goal of “2021 in 2021” – that is 2021 members in the year 2021.

Thank you for all your efforts. They are critical to the success of our organization, and the well-being of our profession.

Keep yourselves and your people safe.
         
Robert M. McMillan, PLS, EiT
CLSA STORE - 2021 PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE
  • 2021 PE Act and PLS Act with Board Rules
  • 2021 Complete Package with DVD
  • 2021 Subdivision Map Act & Index

NSPS - STOLEN EQUIPMENT REGISTRY

Reminder - NSPS provides a registry of stolen equipment. 
Offers a $.07 per page discount and will automatically donate $.10 per page to CLSA when members download courthouse documents through this website. These instruments include Deeds, Easements, Rights-of-Way, Releases, Liens, etc.
OFFICE DEPOT DISCOUNT PROGRAM
Save up to 60% on your office supplies. Click on the Office Depot Logo to begin utilizing the CLSA-Office Depot Discount Program. If you do not know your username and password, or for more information, contact the CLSA Central Office.
The CLSA Education Foundation was established in 1993 and is committed to supporting land surveying students and programs. Last year over $50,000 in scholarship aid was provided to land surveying students. 
 
Donating to the Education Foundation is easy! Click HERE to donate via PayPal.

Thank you to everyone who clicks through to Amazon through the CLSA's Education Foundation Amazon Smile account! If you're not doing so already, please shop on Amazon with this link.
NCEES ANNOUNCES NEW RECORDS OPTION FOR MILITARY FAMILIES SEEKING COMITY LICENSURE
NCEES is pleased to announce that it has added a new option to the NCEES Records program to assist military families with the comity licensure process. Starting April 27, active-duty military and their spouses are eligible to transmit their NCEES Record to a state licensing board at no charge when military orders require them to relocate to that state.
CLSA LOSES FRIEND
PATRICK MCNALLY, PLS 6969
We are saddened to hear of the passing of CLSA Member H. Patrick McNally, Jr., PLS 6969. Born in 1956 to Kay and HP McNally Sr in Gettysburg Pa; Patrick was a man who created lifelong friendships. Upon the birth of his sister Kathleen, he met his first and best friend. They lived in many states before settling in CA. Patrick wrestled at University HS. He played rugby at UCI and CSULB, graduating with a BA in Geography. He wed Nola Lee Burns in 1993 and soon rejoiced in the birth of his son, Liam. Patrick was a keen observer with a penchant for accurate recollection. We couldn't get away with anything. His impeccable attention to detail suited him as a Survey Project Manager. He worked for the County of Orange and Huitt-Zollars for a combined 38 years. He valued his many years working with Rancho Mission Viejo and Ladera Ranch.
CEAC SURVEYORS POLICY COMMITTEE MEETING
May 20, 2021 | 9:00am – 10:15am

Via Zoom | CLICK HERE TO JOIN or call (669) 900-6833 
Meeting ID: 870 7541 0281| Passcode: 727222 
GEOSPATIAL SYMPOSIUM

LEAGUE OF CALIFORNIA SURVEYING ORGANIZATIONS 
Virtually Hosted by CLSA 
Thursday, May 27, 2021 
8:30am – 4:00pm 

The Official Notice and Agenda for the May 27-28, 2021 meeting of the Board for Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors, and Geologists is now available on the Board's website. CLICK HERE.