Did you miss a newsletter? You can catch up by going to the eNotes Archives.
DidYouKnowDid You Know..

Did you know that the of

 Office of Institutional 

Effectiveness will be 

s
haring data about the

 College in this area of

 eNotes each week? Keep

 an eye out to learn more

 about your College!

(Source: CSI Institutional Effectiveness Office
)
 
Chris Bragg
Associate Dean of Institutional Effectiveness
cbragg@csi.edu | 208.732.6201
longevityawardsCSI Longevity Awards
 

On Monday, August 13, 2018, at the College of Southern Idaho Inservice session many employees were recognized for their longevity. 

10 Years
Durham
Ansina
Assistant Public Service Manager
Lindquist
Scott
Student Disability Services Coordinator
Ross
Becky
Course Developer
Craig
Bradley
IT Technician
LaPray
Kimberlee
Public Information Officer
Woods
Cynthia
Now retired
McFarlane
Michele
Registrar
Hamlett
Benjamin
Professor, Food Prod Automation
Harding
Cynthia
Professor, Dental Hygiene
Erickson
Laura
Assoc Prof, Visual & Performing Arts
Neff
Ellen
Assoc Prof, Early Childhood Education
Nutsch
Carrie
Assoc Prof, Surgical 1st Assistant
Reynolds
Matthew
Assoc Prof, Sociology
Waitley
Christalyn
Assoc Prof, Dev Math
Janak
Tamara
Assist Prof, Rad Tech CL Coord
Jones
Suzanne
Instructor, CNA
 
20 Years
Luna
Wanda
Apartment Manager
Baumert
Karen
Sports Information Director
Smith-Schuler
Whitney
Dept Chair/Professor
Meyerhoeffer
Tracey
Interim Department Chair/Professor
Simonson
Randy
Professor, Psychology
Meyerhoeffer
Christopher
Professor, Criminal Justice
Milligan
Janet
Professor, Surgical Tech
Ruby
Kirk
Professor, Business & Economics
Snow
Ryan
Custodian
Nukaya
Bruce
Director,
Haakenson
Duane
Office Manager I, Library
Prestwich
Kimberly
Professor, General & Liberal Studies
Ketterling
Jayme
Manager, Bookstore
 
30 Years
Bottinger
John
Custodial Supervisor

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Wellbeing & Development Coordinator
jheatwole@csi.edu | 208.732.6269
INBRECSI Students Win Awards at the Idaho INBRE Conference
 

Congratulations to CSI Idaho INBRE students Alvin Shihapanya, T opher Dayton, and Spencer Cowan!

Alvin & Topher won 1st place in the INBRE Scholars Category for their work with Drs. Jan Simpkin and Randy Smith titled "The influence of two soil types on the growth of milkweed seeds in a greenhouse"

Spencer won 3rd place in the INBRE Industry Interns Category for his work with Kirk Tubbs and the Twin Falls County Pest Abatement District titled "Utilizing Remote Trapping to Monitor and Regulate Mosquito and Blackfly Populations."

All CSI Idaho INBRE students' represented themselves, CSI and their mentors in the best possible light and I couldn't be more proud of ALL of them.

Please join me in offering congratulations to Alvin, Topher, Spencer and the whole CSI Idaho INBRE team!

All work done by CSI Idaho INBRE students was made possible by an Institutional Development Award (IDeA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Grant #P20GM103408 and with support from the CSI Foundation.

Amy Rice Doetsch, Ph.D.
Professor, Biology
adoetsch@csi.edu | 208.732.6848
sustainabilitySustainability Shares Some Decomposition Facts
Welcome back to a new semester. Here are some interesting facts that will help motivate you in your efforts for the following:
 

Eye opening figures regarding decomposing time in landfills.  Below are items showing substitutions or different destinations other than landfills you may want to try.
 
                                                             Landfill                                   Substitutions or
                                                      Decompose                                              Different
Item ......................................................... Time................................. End Destinations
Paper towels....................................... 2-4 weeks................................ Use washable cloth
Banana peels...................................... 3-4 weeks........................................ Compost pile
Paper bags............................................ 1month........................ Use cloth shopping bags
Newspaper.................................... 1 1/2 months..................... Compost pile or worm bed
Apple cores......................................... 2 months........................................ Compost pile
Cardboard.......................................... 2 months............................................... Make art
Cotton gloves...................................... 3 months........ Send to clothing recycling company
Orange peels....................................... 6 months........................................ Compost pile
Plywood.............................................. 1-3 years.................. Make birdhouses or planters
Wool socks.......................................... 1-5 years........ Send to clothing recycling company
Milk cartons........................................... 5 years........................ Buy milk in glass bottles
Cigarette butts................................. 10-12 years....................................... Stop smoking
Leather shoes.................................. 25-40 years............. Send to shoe recycling company
Tin cans............................................... 50 years............................................... Make art
Foam plastic cups................................. 50 years............ Use your own refillable container
Rubber boot soles............................ 50-80 years............. Send to shoe recycling company
Plastic containers............................. 50-80 years.............................................. Use glass
Aluminum cans............................ 200-500 years............................................... Make art
Plastic bottles..................................... 450 years................... Ask companies to use glass
Disposable diapers.............................. 550 years.............................................. Use cloth
Monofilament fishing line..................... 600 years............................................... Make art
Plastic bags ............................... 200-1,000 years .............................................. Use cloth
 
Ann Keane for Sustainability
Student Success Center
akeane@csi.edu | 208-732-6530
wellness2018-2019 CSI Wellness Events

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Wellness & Development Coordinator
jheatwole@csi.edu | 208.732.6269


CSIFairSave a Booth for the Annual Community Fair at CSI
Greetings!

During the first week of classes the CSI Program Board offers free and fun activities, goodies, and networking opportunities for CSI students. One of those opportunities is the annual Community Fair. The Community Fair is a campus-wide event that takes place during the first week and is the best time for students to have fun, socialize, network, receive free stuff, and exposure to student life opportunities not only on our campus but in our community! It is only held in the Fall Semester and is a great opportunity for you to brag about your department or highlight student involvement or leadership opportunities through clubs and organizations you are involved in or tied to your department. It is also a business vendor fair; with the purpose of fostering a relationship between the College of Southern Idaho, Twin Falls and other surrounding communities. Businesses and community agencies who take part in the fair will have giveaways, information about their services, and be able to have a one-on-one interaction with students, faculty and staff to learn more about services that are in the Twin Falls community. We look forward to your participation in this event which will be held during the first week of classes on Wednesday, August 22, 2018 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m
Click here to fill out the application and then return it Jasmine Lopez ( jlopez@csi.edu) to make sure you are on our list of participants.

Community Fair Booth Benefits:
  • You will be able to connect and network with CSI students.
  • You will have an opportunity to network with local businesses.
  • You will be able to distribute information about your department/organization.
  • You will be able to see what other departments have going on around campus.
Booth Space:

Booth spaces are given a table and two chairs, unless noted otherwise, and a limited number of spots with electricity are available and will be decided on a first-come, first-served basis. The purpose of the Community Fair is to provide an environment where students can learn about the various vendors and organizations within the CSI and Twin Falls Community. To help entice people your way maybe a giveaway or sweet treat at your booth will help. (Make sure it falls within the colleges policies)

This event is sponsored by CSI's Program Board in the Office of Student Affairs. If you know of a business or non-CSI entity that is interested in taking part in this please let me know as their application is different.

Have a great day!

Jasmine López
Student Activities Coordinator
jlopez@csi.edu | 208.732.6229
FacultyPDFaculty Professional Development Opportunities
Please look below for a schedule of professional development opportunities for all full-time, part-time, and dual credit faculty. Staff are also welcome to join any of the sessions.


Click here for a readable version of this document.

Dawn Wendland
Instructional Design Specialist
dwendland@csi.edu | 208.732.6520
DCExpanded Technical Dual Credit Classes Still Available


Melissa Chantry
CTE Early College Coordinator
mchantry@csi.edu | 208.732.6235
ArtsonTourArts on Tour Season Tickets are On Sale Now


Camille Barigar
Community Enrichment Director
cbarigar@csi.edu | 208.732.6288
HerrettHerrett Center Activities
Herrett Center for Arts and Science        
College of Southern Idaho
Museum, Planetarium, Observatory
Year round hours.
 
*Closed Sundays, Mondays, and federal holidays.
Tuesdays
9:30 am to 9:00 pm
Wednesdays
9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Thursdays
9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Fridays
9:30 am to 9:00 pm
Saturdays
1:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Day
         Time 
                Event
Aug. 14
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
We Are Stars, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
7:00 pm
National Parks Adventure
8:00 pm
Dream To Fly
Aug. 15
1:30-3:30 pm
Solar Observing, weather permitting
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
Earth, Moon & Sun, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
Aug. 16
11:00 am
I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
We Are Stars, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
Aug. 17
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
Earth, Moon & Sun, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
7:00 pm
Dinosaurs at Dusk: The Origins of Flight
8:00 pm
Pink Floyd: The Wall
Aug. 18
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
We Are Stars, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
4:30 pm
Dream To Fly
7:00 pm
National Parks Adventure
8:00 pm
Led Zeppelin
Aug. 21
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
We Are Stars, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
6:00 pm
Reptile Revue
7:00 pm
National Parks Adventure
8:00 pm
Dream To Fly
Aug. 22
1:30-3:30 pm
Solar Observing**
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
Earth, Moon & Sun, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure.
Aug. 23
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
We Are Stars, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
Aug. 24
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
Earth, Moon & Sun, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
7:00 pm
Dinosaurs at Dusk: The Origins of Flight
8:00 pm
Pink Floyd: The Wall
Aug. 25
10:00 am-2:00 pm
Free solar observing, KMVT's Kidsfest**
12:00 pm
The Little Star That Could. KMVT Kidsfest 
1:30 pm
The Little Star That Could
2:30 pm
We Are Stars, Wall of China*
3:30 pm
National Parks Adventure
*Live Sky Tour
**Weather Permitting

For May shows at the Faulkner Planetarium   click here
For special events happening at the Herrett Center   click here
For astronomy events in the Centennial Observatory   click here.

Rick Greenawald
Manager, Faulkner Planetarium
rgreenawald@csi.edu | 208.732.6659


GardenU-Pick Garden at the Breckenridge Endowment Farm

Naysa Shepherd
Student Service Specialist
nshepherd@csi.edu | 208.732.6400

VetGolfVeterans 1st Back to School Golf Scramble
 

Brian O'Rorke
Veterans Advocacy Coordinator
bororke@csi.edu | 208.732.6244

EagleGolfFly Like an Eagle Golf Tournament


Jacob Howell
Assistant Athletic Director
jhowell@csi.edu | 208.732.6482

CSIEventsNot Finding an Event? Check CSI's Facebook Events Page!
Visit the  CSI Facebook Events page for more CSI events!
Go-OnThe Gender Gap in Idaho's "Go - On" Rate




For Immediate Release
August 7, 2018

Contact: Mike Keckler
208-332-1591 (office)
208-866-5734 (cell)
Mike.Keckler@osbe.idaho.gov

Article: The Gender Gap in Idaho's "Go-On" Rate
By Dr. Linda Clark, President, Idaho State Board of Education

Idaho's young women are more likely to continue their education immediately after high school than our young men.

In 2017, 52 percent of female high school graduates enrolled in a career technical program or went to college. The "go-on" percentage rate for their high school classmates who are male was just 38 percent - a 14 point gap that has been fairly consistent for several years, meaning over 60 percent of Idaho's young men are choosing not to go on to some form of post-secondary education immediately after high school.

The gender gap occurs across all regions of Idaho and is certainly not unique to our state. Board researchers have found that the gap exists across all levels of academic achievement, including students who do well in high school. In a paper published last spring, State Board Chief Research Officer Dr. Cathleen McHugh wrote, "At every level of academic achievement, females are more likely to immediately attend college than males. In fact, the gap increases as the level of academic achievement increases. Specifically, the gender gap in immediate college attendance rates is largest for the highest achieving students."

It helps to understand reasons why the gap exists. Idaho males are more likely to enlist in the military than Idaho females (Dr. McHugh estimates that of the 2015 graduating class, five percent of male graduates enlisted in the military compared to one percent of female graduates). A sizable portion of Idaho's young male population also serve religious missions after high school. Additionally, when the economy is good, there are more entry-level jobs available for males without a career technical certificate or degree.
There may be other factors at play across our state. "Many Idaho families tend to hold more traditional values where male students seek to have a job as soon as possible, in order to purchase a vehicle, demonstrate financial independence and prepare for becoming a primary breadwinner," said Graydon Stanley, Vice President for Student Services at North Idaho College. "Add to that a mindset opposed to incurring student debt, and the task of getting more of our young men to consider furthering their education becomes more difficult."

Research conducted by State Board staff indicates the go-on gap between males and females narrows by about one third within three years of high school graduation.

If we are to meet our state's workforce needs, we have to find ways to encourage more of our male students to emulate what most of their female classmates are doing and continue their studies after high school, or to resume their education after completing other obligations.

Encouragement may come from the return on investment (ROI) of a college degree. According to a 2015 study by the Urban Institute, the median earnings for college graduates aged 25-34 were 70 percent higher than the median earning for high school graduates. When you multiply that over a 40-year career, the ROI is there many times over.

Idaho is working to make that investment appealing to more students. Governor Otter, the Legislature and the Board have partnered to increase funding for high school students to earn college credit by taking dual credit courses while still in high school. We've also worked together to make additional Opportunity Scholarship dollars available including funds for adults to return and finish a certificate or degree.
College and career counselors are in place in many of our high schools working with students and families to make sure they understand the long term value of higher education.

Our institutions, particularly our community colleges are changing their business models by delivering programs at night and on weekends making it possible for students to work and go to college at the same time.

A $15 per hour job looks pretty good right out of high school and right now there are employment opportunities available, but one must ask themselves how long will this economy last and what about opportunities for future advancement?

The State Board of Education is committed to promoting the value of a career technical certificate or a college degree. Training and education are investments all of our students should make after high school, not only for themselves and their families, but also for the future of our state.

Mike Keckler
Idaho State Board of Education
mike.keckler@osbe.idaho.gov


probationOngoing Employment Opportunities for Students


Collin Widmier
cwidmier@idoc.idaho.gov | 208.736.3080 x19
OrpheumAll-Star Improv Comedy Show
 

Darlene Scott Snyder
The Orpheum
TFLibraryComicsComics & Coffee

CJ Rasmusson
Circulation Supervisor, Twin Falls Public Library
crasmusson@twinfallspubliclibrary.org | 208.733.2964 ext. 101
LeaderCast2018Leadercast 2018: Nourishing Greatness


Join the Idaho SBDC at CSI and the United Way of South Central Idaho for exclusive lunch and learns. Our Nourishing Greatness Luncheons offer you the opportunity to watch exclusive Leadercast materials, network with colleagues, and enjoy a delicious lunch, all while growing your leadership skills. Check the attached poster for locations! Lunch will be served at 11:30 with videos to follow! Thanks to First Federal for making the dream come true!

Jordan Gentry
Training Coordinator/Office Admin
Small Business Development Center
jordangentry@csi.edu | 208.732.6455

Note:  We want to make this document something you look forward 
to  reading each week and your feedback will help tremendously! 
Please  send  your information to klapray@csi.edu.
Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter  View our profile on LinkedIn  Find us on Google+  View our videos on YouTube  View on Instagram
Nondiscrimination Statement:  It is the policy of the College of Southern Idaho to comply with all federal, state and local authorities requiring nondiscrimination, including but not limited to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and Executive Orders 12898 (Environmental Justice) and 13166 (Limited English Proficiency).  College of Southern Idaho is an equal opportunity employer. The college does not exclude from participation in, deny the benefits of, or subject any individual to discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, income, protected veteran status, limited English proficiency, or any other status protected under applicable federal, state or local law.

Gainful Employment data for specific programs may be found on our GE website:  www.csi.edu/ge